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[美国国家公共广播] 【整理】NPR 2008-07-02

NPR NEWS 2008-07-02
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【整理】2008-07-02 【整理人】April18

Transcript

Special thanks to LULU THE MESSIAH

Welcome to Our Elysium (Click here)

 

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer.

 

New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18% in June, just the latest in a string of bad sales months for the auto industry. From Michigan Radio, Dustin Dwyer reports.

 

The only major automaker that managed to show any improvement in June was Honda. It had a sales increase of one percent. This June did have three fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the overall factor affecting the market continues to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lindland of Global Insight says plenty of people are looking to buy a new car so that they can get better fuel economy, but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon. “So, if you're in the market and think I want to improve my fuel economy significantly from what I am driving now, there just are not a lot of choices.” And those choices that are available are in short supply, because the automakers can't build enough small cars to keep up with demand. For NPR News, I'm Dustin Dwyer.

 

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war-related violence despite several high-casualty bombings. At the same time, the death toll for American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Baghdad.


Iraq's Health Ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict slightly with statistics kept by the Associated Press, which counted more than 550 civilian dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Baghdad on June 17, which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers targeted local council meetings where Americans were present. An attack in Baghdad's Sadr City district killed two American soldiers and two civilians who worked for the US government as well as six Iraqis. A bombing at a council meeting in Anbar Province left 20 people dead, including three US marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Baghdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestions he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview where he said that John McCain's military service does not qualify him for the White House. In an interview with NPR today, Clark said his comments about the presumptive Republican presidential nominee have been misconstrued. “When one candidate, like John McCain, has had obvious early experience in the Armed Forces, it is natural then to ask how much is (does) that experience contribute to shaping his judgment and how good his judgment now.” Obama, who did not serve in the military, has frequently cited his own opposition to the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander-in-chief.

 

 

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11, 382. The NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points, ending the session at 2, 305. The S&P 500 rose nearly five points.

 

 

 

This is NPR.

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks. The Seattle-based coffee retailer says it will close nearly 600 of its underperforming US stores. The move is expected to result in a loss of as many as 12, 000 full&part time jobs, around seven percent of the company's global workforce. The company announced today it expects to have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009. Starbucks President Howard Schultz called the decision to close the stores a difficult one to make. Starbucks estimates total pretax charges associated with severance would be in the range of 328 million to 348 million dollars.

 

 

 

The FBI is investigating the death of a 19-year-old man who was jailed a day earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports.

 

The Maryland Medical Examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White's death in a Prince George's County jail was from strangulation. The Maryland State Police and FBI are investigating, and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White had been charged with first-degree murder in the death last week of a Prince George's County officer. The officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck. Authorities said White was driving the truck and that it had been stolen. White was one of four people arrested when the truck was found at a nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guards say they put White in a maximum-security cell and had been checking on him every half hour. At 10: 15 a.m., they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. Fifteen minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs problems in the housing market have further to go: the government says construction spending fell four-tenths of a percent in May.


I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 

 

[ 本帖最后由 April18 于 2008-7-2 19:40 编辑 ]

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支持普特英语听力就多多发帖吧!您们的参与是对斑竹工作最大的肯定与支持!如果您觉得还不错,推荐给周围的朋友吧~
homework

From NPR News in Washington, I’m Jack Speer.

 

New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18% in June, just the latest in a string of bad sales months for the auto industry. From Michigan Radio, Dustin Dwyer reports.

The only major automaker that managed to show any improvement in June was Honda. It had a sales increase of 1%. This June did have three fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the overall factor affecting the market continues to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lindland of Global Insight says plenty of people are looking to buy a new car so that they can get better fuel economy, but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon. “So if you’re in the market and think I want to improve my fuel economy significantly from what I’m driving now, there just aren’t a lot of choices.” And those choices that are available are in short supply, because the automakers can’t build enough small cars to keep up with the demand. For NPR News, I’m Dustin Dwyer.

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war-related violence despite several high-casualty bombings. At the same time the death toll for American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR’s Corey Flintoff reports from Baghdad.

Iraq’s Health Ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict slightly with statistics kept by the Associated Press, which counted more than 550 civilian dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Baghdad on June 17 which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers targeted local council meetings where Americans were present. An attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City district killed 2 American soldiers and 2 civilians who worked for the US government as well as 6 Iraqis. A bombing at a council meeting in the Anbar Province left 20 people dead, including 3 US Marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Baghdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestions that he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview where he said that John McCain’s military service does not qualify him for the White House. In an interview with NPR today, Clark said his comments about the presumptive Republican presidential nominee have been misconstrued. “When one candidate like John McCain has had obvious early experience in the Armed Forces, it’s natural then to ask how much does that experience contribute to shaping his judgment and how good (is) his judgment now.” Obama who did not serve in the military has frequently cited his own opposition in the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander-in-chief.

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11,382. The NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points ending the session at 2,309. The S&P 500 rose nearly 5 points.

 

This is NPR.

 

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks. The Seattle-based coffee retailer says it would close nearly 600 of its underperforming US stores. The move is expected to result in a loss of as many as 12,000 full and part time jobs, around 7% of the company’s global workforce. The company now says it expects to have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009. Starbucks President Howard Schultz called the decision to close the stores a difficult one to make. Starbucks estimates the total pretax charges associated with the severance would be in the range of 320 million to 340 million dollars.

 

The FBI is investigating the death of a 19-year-old man who was jailed a day earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston reports.

The Maryland medical examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White’s death in a Prince George's County’s jail was from strangulation. The Maryland state police and FBI are investigating, and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White had been charged with first degree murder in the death last week of a Prince George’s County officer. The officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck. Authorities said White was driving the truck and that it had been stolen. White was one of four people arrested when the truck was found in a nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guards say they put White in a maximum-security cell and had been checking on him every half hour. At 10:15 AM, they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. Fifteen minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs of problems of the housing market have further to go. The government says construction spending fell 4/10 of a percent in May.

 

I’m Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 

1

评分次数

  • April18

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homework

楼上so强大的说,没改出来。看别人怎么改~~

From NPR News in Washington, I’m Jack Speer.

 

New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18% in June, just the latest in a string of bad sales months for the auto industry. From Michigan Radio, Dustin Dwyer reports.

The only major automaker that managed to show any improvement in June was Honda. It had a sales increase of 1%. This June did have three fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the overall factor affecting the market continues to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lindland of Global Insight says plenty of people are looking to buy a new car so that they can get better fuel economy, but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon. “So if you’re in the market and think I want to improve my fuel economy significantly from what I’m driving now, there just aren’t a lot of choices.” And those choices that are available are in short supply, because the automakers can’t build enough small cars to keep up with the demand. For NPR News, I’m Dustin Dwyer.

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war-related violence despite several high-casualty bombings. At the same time the death toll for American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR’s Corey Flintoff reports from Baghdad.

Iraq’s Health Ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict slightly with statistics kept by the Associated Press, which counted more than 550 civilian dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Baghdad on June 17 which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers targeted local council meetings where Americans were present. An attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City district killed 2 American soldiers and 2 civilians who worked for the US government as well as 6 Iraqis. A bombing at a council meeting in the Anbar Province left 20 people dead, including 3 US Marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Baghdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestions that he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview where he said that John McCain’s military service does not qualify him for the White House. In an interview with NPR today, Clark said his comments about the presumptive Republican presidential nominee have been misconstrued. “When one candidate like John McCain has had obvious early experience in the Armed Forces, it’s natural then to ask how much does that experience contribute to shaping his judgment and how good (is) his judgment now.” Obama who did not serve in the military has frequently cited his own opposition in the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander-in-chief.

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11,382. The NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points ending the session at 2,309. The S&P 500 rose nearly 5 points.

 

This is NPR.

 

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks. The Seattle-based coffee retailer says it would close nearly 600 of its underperforming US stores. The move is expected to result in a loss of as many as 12,000 full and part time jobs, around 7% of the company’s global workforce. The company now says it expects to have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009. Starbucks President Howard Schultz called the decision to close the stores a difficult one to make. Starbucks estimates the total pretax charges associated with the severance would be in the range of 320 million to 340 million dollars.

 

The FBI is investigating the death of a 19-year-old man who was jailed a day earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston reports.

The Maryland medical examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White’s death in a Prince George's County’s jail was from strangulation. The Maryland state police and FBI are investigating, and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White had been charged with first degree murder in the death last week of a Prince George’s County officer. The officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck. Authorities said White was driving the truck and that it had been stolen. White was one of four people arrested when the truck was found in a nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guards say they put White in a maximum-security cell and had been checking on him every half hour. At 10:15 AM, they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. Fifteen minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs of problems of the housing market have further to go. The government says construction spending fell 4/10 of a percent in May.

 

I’m Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

实现无障碍英语沟通

on sherrycream

From NPR News in Washington, I’m Jack Speer.

 

New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18% in June, just the latest in a string of bad sales months for the auto industry. From Michigan Radio, Dustin Dwyer reports.

The only major auto maker that managed to show any improvement in June was Honda. It had a sales increase of 1%. This June did have three fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the overall factor affecting the market continues to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lynn of Global Insights says plenty of people are looking to buy / new cars so that they can get better fuel economy, but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon. “So if you’re in the market  say I want to improve my actual company significantly from what I’m driving now, there just aren’t a lot of choices.” And those choices that are available are in short supply, because the automakers can’t build enough small cars to keep up with the demand. For NPR News, I’m Dustin Dwyer.

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war-related violence despite several high-casualty bombings. At the same time the death toll for American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR’s Corey Flintoff reports from Baghdad.

Iraq’s Health Ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict slightly with statistics kept by the Associated Press, which counted more than 550 civilian dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Baghdad on June 17 which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers targeted local council meetings where Americans were present. An attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City district killed 2 American soldiers and 2 civilians who worked for the US government as well as 6 Iraqis. A bombing at a council meeting in the Anbar Province left 20 people dead, including 3 US Marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Baghdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestions / he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview where he said that John McCain’s military service does not qualify him for the White House. In an interview with NPR today, Clark said his comments about the presumptive Republican presidential nominee have been misconstrued. “When one candidate like John McCain has had obvious early experience in the Armed Forces, it’s natural then to ask how much is that experience can be contributed to shaping his judgment and how good (is) his judgment now.” Obama who did not serve in the military has frequently cited his own opposition in the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander-in-chief.

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11,382. The NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points ending the session at 2,309. The S&P 500 rose nearly 5 points.

 

This is NPR.

 

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks. The Seattle-based coffee retailer says it will close nearly 600 of its underperforming US stores. The move is expected to result in a loss of as many as 12,000 full and part time jobs, around 7% of the company’s global workforce. The company now says it expects to have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009. Starbucks President Howard Schultz called the decision to close the stores a difficult one to make. Starbucks estimates the total pretax charges associated as the severance would be in the range of 320 million to 340 million dollars.

 

The FBI is investigating the death of a 19-year-old man who was jailed a day earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston reports.

The Maryland medical examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White’s death in a Prince George's County’s jail was from strangulation. The Maryland state police and FBI are investigating, and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White had been charged with first-degree murder in the death last week of a Prince George’s County officer. The officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck. Authorities said White was driving the truck and then it had been stolen. White was one of four people arrested when the truck was found in a nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guards say they put White in a maximum-security cell and had been checking on him every half hour. At 10:15 AM, they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. Fifteen minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs of problems of the housing market have further to go. The government says construction spending fell 4/10 of a percent in May.

 

I’m Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

[ 本帖最后由 byatbj07 于 2008-7-2 11:26 编辑 ]
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From mud, through blood, to the green fields beyond.
口译专员推荐—>口译训练软件IPTAM口译通
强大么?不强大吧

a Prince George's County jail
俺在County和jail之间多写了个's


最后一条琢磨了半天,现在想想大概应该是这个样子的
More signs problems of the housing market have further to go: the government says...
signs后面省略了一个that
專業代查字典兼回答一切可google到答案的問題

hw(ms ls写错了个数字,NASDAQ那

 

From NPR News in Washington, I’m Jack Speer.

 

New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18 percent in June just the latest in a string of bad sales month with the auto industry. From Michigan Radio, D W reports.

 

The only major auto maker that managed to show any improvement in June was Honda and had a sales increase of one percent. This June it did have fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the overall factor affecting the market continued to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lindland of Global Insight says plenty of people are looking to buy a new car so that they can get better fuel economy. But only 12 percent of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon. “So if you are in the market and saying ‘I want to improve my fuel economy significantly from what I’m driving now there just are not a lot of choices.” And these choices that are available are in short supply because the auto makers can’t build enough small cars to keep up with demand. From NPR News, I’m D W.

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month at war related violence despite several high-casualty bombings. At the same time, the death toll of American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR’s Corey Flintoff reports from Baghdad.

 

Iraq’s self ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict slightly with statistic kept by the Associated Press which counted more than 550 civilians dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Baghdad on June 17th which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers targeted local council meeting where Americans were present. An attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City District killed two American soldiers and two civilians who worked for the US government as well as six Iraqis. A bombing at a council meeting in Anbar Province left 20 people dead including three US Marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff NPR News, Baghdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestions he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview where he said John McCain’s military service does not qualify for the White House. In interview with NPR today, Clark said his comments about the presumptive Republican presidential nominee had been misconstrued. “When one candidate like John McCain has had obvious early experience in the armed forces, it’s natural then to ask how much is that experience contributed to shaping his judgment and how good is his judgment now.”  Obama who didn’t serve in the military has frequently signed his own opposition and 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander in chief.

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11, 382. The NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points ending the session at 2, 305. The S&P 500 rose nearly five points.

 

This is NPR.

 

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks. The Seattle based coffee retailer says they will close nearly 600 of its under-performing US stores. The move is expected to resolve a loss as many as 12,000 full and part time jobs around seven percent of the company’s global workforce. The company announces it expects to have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009. Starbucks’ President Howard Shultz called the decision of closing stores a difficult one to make. Starbucks estimated a total pretax charges associated with the severance would be in a range of 328 million to 348 million dollars.

 

The FBI is investigating the death of a 19-year-old man who was jailed a day earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston reports.

 

The Maryland Medical Examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White’s death in the Prince George’s County jail was from strangulation. The Maryland state police and FBI are investigating and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White has been charged with first-degree murder and in the death last week of a Prince George’s County officer. The officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck. Authority said White was driving the truck and that it had been stolen. White was one of the four people arrested when the truck was found in a nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guards say they put White in a maximum security cell and had been checking on him every half an hour. At 10:50 AM, they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. 15 minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs of problems on the housing market have further to go. The government says constructions spending fell four tenth of a percent in May.

 

I am Jack Speer, NPR News, in Washington.

 

[ Last edited by skyRo at 2008-7-2 13:02 ]
我真心希望能获得守护她的力量
怀着这份心意
我一直静静的凝视着窗外的风景

hw

From NPR News in Washington, I`m Jack Speer.

 

New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18% in June just the latest in a string of bad sales month with the auto industry. From Michigan Radio Dustin Dwyer reports.

 

The only major automaker that managed to show any improvement in June was h*, it had a sales increase of 1%, this June it did have 3 fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the over all factor affecting the market continues to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lindland of Global Insights says plenty of people are looking to buy new cars, so that they can get better fuel economy but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon.

 

“So if you are in the market and saying, I want to improve my fuel economy, it`s significantly from what I am driving now. There just aren`t a lot of choices.”

 

And these choices that are available are in short supply because the automakers can`t build enough small cars to keep up with demand. For NPR News, I`m Dustin Dwyer.

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war-related violence despite several high casualty bombings, at the same time, the death toll of American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR`s Corey Flintoff reports from Bagdad.

 

Iraq`s Health Ministry says 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict fairly with statistics kept by Associated Press, which counted more than 550 civilian dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Bagdad on June 17th which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers target local council meetings where Americans were present. And attack in Bagdad Sadr City district killed 2 American soldiers and 2 civilians who worked for the US government as well as 6 Iraqis, a bombing at a council meeting in Anbar Province left 20 people dead, including 3 US marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Bagdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestion he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview, where he said the John McCain`s military service does not qualifying for the White House, in interview with NPR today, Clark says his comments about presumptive republican presidential nominee have been misconstrued.


“When one candidate like John McCain has had obvious early experience in the Arm Forces, it`s natural * to ask how much is that experience contribute to shaping his judgment, and how good his judgment now?”

 

Obama who did not serve in the military has frequently said his own opposition to the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander in chief.

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11382, the NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points ending the session at 2305, the S&P 500 rose nearly 5 points.

 

This is NPR.

 

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks, the Seattle  based coffee retailer, says it will close nearly 600 of its under performing US stores, the move is expected to result a loss of as many as 12,000 full and part time jobs around 7% of the company`s global workforce, * said it expected have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009, Starbucks president Howard Shultz called the decision that closes the stores ‘a difficult one to make’, Starbucks estimates total pretax charges of associated * will be in a range of 328 million to 348 million dollars.

 

The FBI`s investigating the death of 19 year old man who was jailed a day early for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR`s Dina Temple-Raston reports.

 

The Maryland medical examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White`s death in a Prince George`s County Jail was from strangulation, the Maryland state police and FBI are investigating and the FBI`s focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White has been charged with first degree murder in the death last week of Prince George`s county officer, the officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck, authority said White was driving a truck and that it had been stolen, White was one of the four people arrested during the truck was founded in nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guard said they put White in a maximum security cell, and had been checking on him every half hour, at 10:15 am, they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk, 15 minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs of problems on the housing market have further to go. The government says constructions` spending fell four tenth of a percent in May.

 

I am Jack Speer, NPR News, in Washington.

实现无障碍英语沟通

homework

    From NPR News in Washington. I am Jack Spear.

    New vehicle sales in the US droped 18% in June just the latest in the stream of ban sales month for the auto industry. From Michigan’s radio Dustent Wire reports.

    The only major auto-maker that manages to show any improvement in June was Hunder. It had a sales increase of 1%. This June did have 3 fewer business days for car dealers than last June. But the overall factors affecting the market continues to be the gas prices. Analysis ???? of Globle insight says plenty of people are looking to buy a new cars so that they can get better fuel economy but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon.

     “So, if you are marketing, I want to improve my fuel economy significantly from what I am driving now. They are just on a lot of choices.”

    And those choices that are available are in short supply because the auto-makers can’t build enough small cars to keep up with the demand. From NPR News. I am Dustent Wire.

    Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war related violence despite serveral high casualty bombings. At the same time the death toll from American Forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR’s Coliflen Tough reports from Bagdad.

    Iraq’s Health Ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month down from 505 in May. Those figures can flick slightly with statistics kept by the Associated Press which counts more than 550 civilians dead in June. The most deadly single attack was truck bombing in Bagdad on June 17th which killed 63 people. More recently bomb was targeted to local council meeting where Americans were present. And an attack in Bagdad Sador City District killed 2 Americans soldiers and two civilians who work for the US Government as well as 6 Iraqis. A bombing in a council meeting in Anbul Province left 20 people dead, including 3 US marines and their interpreters. Corie Frenta, NPR News in Bagdad.

    Retired General Vesly Karl has rejected suggestions he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview, where he said John MacCain’s military services does not qualify him for the White House. In a interview with NPR today Karl said his comments about the assumptive  Repubican presidential nominee has been misconstrued.

    “When one candidate like John MacCain has had obvious early experience in the arm forces. It is natural then to ask how much does that experience contribute to shape his judgement, and how good is the judgement now.”

Obama who did not serve in the military has recently cited his own opposition of 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be Commander in Chief.

    On Wall Street the Dow-Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11382, the Nasdaq gained nearly 12 points ending the cession of 2305. S&P 500 rose nearly 5 points.

    This is NPR.

    Coffee giant Store Box is announcing major cutback as a seattle-based coffee retailer says it will close nearly 600 of its under-performing US stores. The move is expected to result the loss as many as 12000 full and part time jobs around 7 percent of the company’s globle work force. The company now say it is expected to have complete the majority of the closing by the end of March, 2009. Store Box President Haw Show called the decision to close the doors a difficult one to make. Store Box estimates the total pretax charges associated with book 7 would be in the range from 328 million to 348 million dollars.

    The FBI is investigating the death of 19-year-old man who had jailed today earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR’s Dino Temple Ruston reports.

     The Maryland medical exam revealed Monday that Runing White’s death in the Prince George County jail was from strangulation. The Maryland State police and FBI are investigating and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Running White had been charged with the first degree murder in the death last week of Prince George County officer. The officer got out of his car, and he was hit injured by a truck. Authorities said White was driving the truck and that had been stolen. White was one of the four people arrested when the truck was found in a nearby appartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guard say they put White in a maximum security cell and have been checking on him every half hour. At 10:50 am they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. 15 minutes later, he was found dead. Deno Temple Ruston, NPR News, Washington.

    More signs of problems on the housing market have further to go. The government says the construction spending fell 4/10 of a percent in May.

    I am Jack Spear, NPR News in Washington.

 

普特听力大课堂
on byatbj07 

楼主的头像很强大,每回我都不敢正视,哈哈

byatbj07,我觉的楼主有的地方听的是正确的,我给改过来了,希望你能在听一下。

From NPR News in Washington, I’m Jack Speer.

 

New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18% in June, just the latest in a string of bad sales months for the auto industry. From Michigan Radio, Dustin Dwyer reports.

The only major auto maker that managed to show any improvement in June was Honda. It had a sales increase of 1%. This June did have three fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the overall factor affecting the market continues to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lynn of Global Insights says plenty of people are looking to buy a new car so that they can get better fuel economy, but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon. “So if you’re in the market and think I want to improve my fuel economy significantly from what I’m driving now, there just aren’t a lot of choices.” And those choices that are available are in short supply, because the automakers can’t build enough small cars to keep up with the demand. For NPR News, I’m Dustin Dwyer.

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war-related violence despite several high-casualty bombings. At the same time the death toll for American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR’s Corey Flintoff reports from Baghdad.

Iraq’s Health Ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict slightly with statistics kept by the Associated Press, which counted more than 550 civilian dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Baghdad on June 17 which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers targeted local council meetings where Americans were present. An attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City district killed 2 American soldiers and 2 civilians who worked for the US government as well as 6 Iraqis. A bombing at a council meeting in the Anbar Province left 20 people dead, including 3 US Marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Baghdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestions he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview where he said that John McCain’s military service does not qualifying \ for the White House. In an interview with NPR today, Clark said his comments about the presumptive Republican presidential nominee have been misconstrued. “When one candidate like John McCain has had obvious early experience in the Armed Forces, it’s natural then to ask how much is that experience \ contribute to shaping his judgment and how good is his judgment now.” Obama who did not serve in the military has frequently cited his own opposition in the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander-in-chief.

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11,382. The NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points ending the session at 2,305. The S&P 500 rose nearly 5 points.

 

This is NPR.

 

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks. The Seattle-based coffee retailer says it will close nearly 600 of its underperforming US stores. The move is expected to result in a loss of as many as 12,000 full and part time jobs, around 7% of the company’s global workforce. The company now says it expects to have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009. Starbucks President Howard Schultz called the decision to close the stores a difficult one to make. Starbucks estimates the total pretax charges associated as the severance would be in the range of 328 million to 348 million dollars.

 

The FBI is investigating the death of a 19-year-old man who was jailed a day earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston reports.

The Maryland medical examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White’s death in a Prince George's County’s jail was from strangulation. The Maryland state police and FBI are investigating, and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White had been charged with first-degree murder in the death last week of a Prince George’s County officer. The officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck. Authorities said White was driving the truck and then it had been stolen. White was one of four people arrested when the truck was found in a nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guards say they put White in a maximum-security cell and had been checking on him every half hour. At 10:15 AM, they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. Fifteen minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs of problems of the housing market have further to go. The government says construction spending fell 4/10 of a percent in May.

 

I’m Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 




好栏目推荐之美国口语俚语

 on Superman

From NPR News in Washington, I’m Jack Speer.

 

 New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18% in June, just the latest in a string of bad sales months for the auto industry. From Michigan Radio, Dustin Dwyer reports.

 

The only major automaker that managed to show any improvement in June was Honda. It had a sales increase of 1%. This June did have three fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the overall factor affecting the market continues to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lynn of Global Insights says plenty of people are looking to buying new cars so that they can get better fuel economy, but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon. “So if you’re in the market and say I want to improve my fuel economy significantly from what I’m driving now, there just aren’t a lot of choices.” And those choices that are available are in short supply, because the automakers can’t build enough small cars to keep up with / demand. For NPR News, I’m Dustin Dwyer.

 

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war-related violence despite several high-casualty bombings. At the same time the death toll for American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR’s Corey Flintoff reports from Baghdad.

 

Iraq’s Health Ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict slightly with statistics kept by the Associated Press, which counted more than 550 civilian dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Baghdad on June 17 which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers targeted local council meetings where Americans were present. An attack in Baghdad’s Sadr City district killed 2 American soldiers and 2 civilians who worked for the US government as well as 6 Iraqis. A bombing at a council meeting in the Anbar Province left 20 people dead, including 3 US Marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Baghdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestions / he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview where he said that John McCain’s military service does not qualify him (考虑一下grammar哦)for the White House. In an interview with NPR today, Clark said his comments about the presumptive Republican presidential nominee have been misconstrued. “When one candidate like John McCain has had obvious early experience in the Armed Forces, it’s natural then to ask how much is that experience contribute to shaping his judgment and how good (is) his judgment now.” Obama who did not serve in the military has frequently cited his own opposition to the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander-in-chief.

 

 

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11,382. The NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points ending the session at 2,305. The S&P 500 rose nearly 5 points.

 

 

 

This is NPR.

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks. The Seattle-based coffee retailer says it will close nearly 600 of its underperforming US stores. The move is expected to result in a loss of as many as 12,000 full and part time jobs, around 7% of the company’s global workforce. The company now says it expects to have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009. Starbucks President Howard Schultz called the decision to close the stores a difficult one to make. Starbucks estimates the total pretax charges associated with severance would be in the range of 328 million to 348 million dollars.

 

 

 

The FBI is investigating the death of a 19-year-old man who was jailed a day earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston reports.

 

The Maryland medical examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White’s death in a Prince George's County’s jail was from strangulation. The Maryland state police and FBI are investigating, and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White had been charged with first-degree murder in the death last week of a Prince George’s County officer. The officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck. Authorities said White was driving the truck and that it had been stolen. White was one of four people arrested when the truck was found in a nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guards say they put White in a maximum-security cell and had been checking on him every half hour. At 10:15 AM, they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. Fifteen minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs of problems of the housing market have further to go. The government says construction spending fell 4/10 of a percent in May.

 

I’m Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 

on myconsent

 

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer.

 

New vehicle sales in the US dropped 18% in June, just the latest in a string of bad sales months for the auto industry. From Michigan Radio, Dustin Dwyer reports.

 

The only major automaker that managed to show any improvement in June was Honda. It had a sales increase of 1%. This June did have three fewer business days for car dealers than last June, but the overall factor affecting the market continues to be gas prices. Analyst Rebecca Lindland of Global Insight says plenty of people are looking to buying new cars so that they can get better fuel economy, but only 12% of the vehicles on the market get better than 25 miles per gallon. So if you're in the market and think I want to improve my fuel economy significantly from what I am driving now, there just are not a lot of choices. And those choices that are available are in short supply, because the automakers can't build enough small cars to keep up with demand. For NPR News, I'm Dustin Dwyer.

 

 

Iraqi government says fewer civilians died last month in war-related violence despite several high-casualty bombings. At the same time, the death toll for American forces rose slightly in June to 29. NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Baghdad.


Iraq's Health Ministry said 448 civilians died in violence last month, down from 505 in May. Those figures conflict slightly with statistics kept by the Associated Press, which counted more than 550 civilian dead in June. The most deadly single attack was a truck bombing in Baghdad on June 17, which killed 63 people. More recently, bombers targeted local council meetings where Americans were present. An attack in Baghdad's Sadr City district killed two American soldiers and two civilians who worked for the US government, as well as six Iraqis. A bombing at a council meeting in the Anbar Province left 20 people dead, including three US Marines and their interpreters. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Baghdad.

 

Retired General Wesley Clark has rejected suggestions he should apologize for remarks made during a television interview where he said that John McCain's military service does not qualify him for the White House. In an interview with NPR today, Clark said his comments about the presumptive Republican presidential nominee have been misconstrued. When one candidate like John McCain has had obvious early experience in the Armed Forces, it is natural then to ask how much does that experience contribute to shaping his judgment and how good (is) his judgment now. Obama who did not serve in the military has frequently cited his own opposition to the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of the judgment needed to be commander-in-chief.

 

 

 

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 32 points today to close at 11, 382. The NASDAQ gained nearly 12 points ending the session at 2, 305. The S&P 500 rose nearly 5 points.

 

 

 

This is NPR.

Coffee giant Starbucks is announcing major cutbacks. The Seattle-based coffee retailer says it will close nearly 600 of its underperforming US stores. The move is expected to result in a loss of as many as 12, 000 full and part time jobs, around 7% of the company's global workforce. The company now says it expects to have completed the majority of the closings by the end of March of 2009. Starbucks President Howard Schultz called the decision to close the stores a difficult one to make. Starbucks estimates the total pretax charges associated with severance would be in the range of 328 million to 348 million dollars.

 

 

 

The FBI is investigating the death of a 19-year-old man who was jailed a day earlier for killing a policeman in Maryland. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports.

 

The Maryland medical examiner ruled Monday that Ronnie White's death in a Prince George's County / jail was from strangulation. The Maryland state police and FBI are investigating, and the FBI is focusing on possible civil rights violations. Ronnie White had been charged with first-degree murder in the death last week of a Prince George's County officer. The officer got out of his car and was hit and dragged by a truck. Authorities said White was driving the truck and that it had been stolen. White was one of four people arrested when the truck was found in a nearby apartment complex shortly after the officer was killed. Prison guards say they put White in a maximum-security cell and had been checking on him every half hour. At 10: 15 A. M, they say he was alert and sitting on the side of his bunk. Fifteen minutes later, he was found dead. Dina Temple-Raston, NPR News, Washington.

 

More signs of problems of the housing market have further to go. The government says construction spending fell four tenth of a percent in May.


I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 

[ 本帖最后由 greatsea 于 2008-7-2 17:34 编辑 ]
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