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[美国国家公共广播] 【整理】NPR 2008-10-02

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【整理】NPR 2008-10-02  【整理人】翩然花逝

 

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer.

 

Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan, though from the floor debate it's clear there are lawmakers who continue to have reservations. Vermont independent Senator Bernie Sanders said there's no way he can vote for the bill at least in its current form. "This bill does not address the major economic crisis we face: growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs, rebuilding our infrastructure, and moving us to energy efficiency and sustainable energy". But others in the Senate stressed the importance of getting the bill through. Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said action needs to be taken, calling it not just a Wall Street but a main street issue.  "A halt from the flow of money threatens not only Wall Street firms, which would not bring us here today, but what is a danger is the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan." Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweeteners including raising the FDIC coverage limit on bank accounts, and putting in place middle-class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure. It's expected the House will take up the bill on Friday.

 

Even as congressional lawmakers work toward a financial rescue package, one program geared toward helping troubled homeowners is already under way. Aimed at helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosure, the new program will let an estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages from more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgages to decide whether or not they participate. The qualified borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments.

 

US companies continued to hand out more pink slips in September. Thats according to a new report from Challenger Gray & Christmas. The number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month. NPR's David Nogueras reports.

 

Most of the cuts came in the computer industry. Tech-companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of Titans, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger, chief executive of Challenger Gray & Christmas, says things will only get worse for the financial sector.  "For the year we've seen over 111,000 jobs cuts there. It's the leading sector in the economy and it looks like the lull before the storm." Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US auto-makers, he points out, have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueras, NPR News.

 

Major auto-makers weighed in with their September sales numbers today. Most showed double-digit declines. Ford says September sales were down more than 34.5%. GM says September sales fell 16%, compared to a year ago. Toyota's sales were down 32%.

 

On Wall Street today the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 19 points to end the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today.

 

This is NPR.

 

Jurors at the trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens today were shown "Thank you" notes he wrote to an oil-pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmakers' home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes show that Stevens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of VECO Corporation, a long-time-friend of Stevens, has testified his company paid for the work. However the notes shown to jurors also discussed home financing, bolstering defense attorney's claims the senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile were sent home early today to accommodate one member of the jury panel. The government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on Senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts.

 

National Transportation Safety Board has released new information from its investigation of the deadly collision between a Los Angeles commuter train and a freight train last month. Karen Grigsby Bates reports.

 

In its latest update, the NTSB released subpoenaed records from Metrolink engineer Robert Sanchez's phone activity on the day of the crash. In the first two hours of the split shift, Sanchez's cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of the shift, the phone received seven text messages and sent five. Record showed that the last text was sent from his cell at 4:22:01PM. Data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train the Metrolink crashed into indicate the collision occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash a few teen train buffs told a reporter they'd been texting with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data and the engineer's cell to refine the exact collision time. Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR News.

 

And I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.


[ 本帖最后由 翩然花逝 于 2008-10-9 00:41 编辑 ]

普特在线文本比较普特在线听音查字普特在线拼写检查普特文本转音频

支持普特英语听力就多多发帖吧!您们的参与是对斑竹工作最大的肯定与支持!如果您觉得还不错,推荐给周围的朋友吧~

HW(On everyzing script)

From NPR news in Washington, I'm Jack Speer. Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan, though from the Florida debate it's clear their lawmakers who continue to have reservations from on independent senator Bernie Sanders said there's no way he can vote for the bill at least in its current form.

 “This bill does not address. The major economic crises we face. Growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs rebuilding our infrastructure. And moving us to the energy efficiency and sustainable engine.

But others in the Senate stressed the importance of getting a bill through Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd chairman of the Senate banking committee said action needs to be taken calling it not just a Wall Street but a main street issue.

A halt from the flow of money threatens is not only Wall Street firms. Which would not bring us here today but what is a dangerous the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan.

Leaders in both parties are predicting that several sweeteners including raising the FBI seek coverage limit on bank accounts. And putting in place middle class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure expected the house will take up a bill on Friday. Even asking aggression lawmakers work toward a financial rescue package one program geared toward helping troubled homeowners is already under way. And helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosures new program was / estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages from more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgage decide whether or not they participate. The qualifier of  borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments. US companies continued hand out more pink slips in September, that’s according to a new report from challenger gray and Christmas the number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month, NPR's David Garrett reports. Most of the cuts came in the computer industry. Tech-companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of titans Lehman Brothers , Merrill Lynch ,Feli Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger chief executive of Challenger Gray and Christmas says things will only get worse for the financial sector.

“For the year we've seen over 111,000 jobs cuts there. It's the leading sector in the economy and it looks like if the lull before the storm. ”

Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US auto-makers he points out have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. Even Newgears NPR News.

Major auto-makers waited with the September sales numbers today most show double digit declines. / says September sales were down more than 34.5%, GM says September sales fell 16%. Compared to a year ago. Toyota's sales were down 32%. On Wall Street today the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down at 19 points and the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today. This is NPR . Doors at the trial of Alaska senator Ted Stevens today were shown “Thank you!” notes he wrote an oil pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmakers’ home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes showed that Stephens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of / corporation a long-time-friend of Stevens has testified his company paid for the work. Over the notes shown to jurors also discuss home financing bolstering defense attorneys claims the senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile sent home early today to comedy one member of the jury panel. The government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts. National Transportation Safety Board has released a information from its investigation of the deadly collision between Los Angeles commuter train and a freight train last month ,Karen Grigsby Bates reports.

In its latest update the NTSB released / records from metro link engineer Robert Sanchez  says his phone activity on the day of the crash. In the first two hours of the split shift. Sanchez’s cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of his ship the phone received seven text messages and sent five. Records show that the last text was sent from his cell at 4:22:01PM. Data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train / crashed into indicate the collision occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash a few teen train / told a reporter they'd been testing with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data. And the engineer it / to refine the exact collision time, Karen Grigsby Bates NPR news. And I'm Jack Spear NPR news in Washington.

 

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From NPR News in Washington. I'm Jack Speer.



  Senate law makers are moving toward vote tonight on * the 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan. Those from the Florida Bay it's clear to our law makers continue to have reservations. For on independent Senator * * said there is no way he can vote for the bill at least at its current form. "This bill does not address. But major economic crisis we face rolling on employment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs, rebuilding our infrastructure and moving us to energy inefficiency and sustainable energy." But others in the Senate stress the importance of getting through the bill. Connecticut Senator Christopher Dodd, Chairman of Senator Banking Committee, said action needs be taking account in not the Wall Street but a main street issue. "A * to the floor of money threaten * Wall Street firms, which will not bring as here today. But what is a dangerous the way of life for millions of Americans far we are. Lower might happen." Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweaters including raise the FDIC coverage limit on bank account and putting in place middle class taxpayers will help speed passage for measure. It expects the House will take up the bill on Friday.



  Even as Congressnial law makers work toward the financial rescue package, one program yield toward helping troubled home owners is already underway, and help prevent additional mortgage holders from following before closure to new program will lead the estimated 400,000 homeowners swept their current mortgages from more on * burns. It will be after the banks holding the mortgage beside whether or not they participate. The qualified borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments.



  U.S. companies continue to head up more pink slips in September. That's according to a new report from Challenge Grade and Christmas. The number of finance lay off throw 7.2% last month. NPR's David Nogueras reports.



  Most of the cuts came into the computer industry. Tech companies * in it more than 25,000 jobs in September. Mike *, financial services companies * over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of titans, Lehman Brothers, *, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenge, chief executive of Challenge Grade Christmas, says thing was only getting worse for financial sector. "For the there, we see over 111,000 jobs cut there. It's the leading sector in the economy and that looks like flow before the storm." Challenge says troublesome Wall Street are largely over swallowing * in the oil industry. U.S. auto makers hit points out have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueas, NPR News.



  Major auto makers waiting with their September sale numbers today, most show double digit declines. Ford says September sale will down more 34.5%. GM says September sale fells 16% compared a year ago. Toyota sale will down 32%.



  On Wall Street today, the Dow Jones Industrial Average close down 19 points, ended the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today. This is NPR.



  Georgia at tryable Alaska Senator Ted Stevens today were shown thank you notes he wrote to the oil pipeline contract who oversaw work at law makers' home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes show the Stevens was well he was getting innovation carried out in Alaska home for free. Go on an * cooperation a long time friend Stevens’ testified his company pay for the work. Of the notes, * also discuss home financing both during the defense attorneys' claims. The senator intend to pay for project. * meanwhile recent on early today, to committee one member of the jury panel. Government alleged the Alaska Republican * Senator * about receiving total 50,000 dollars and gifts.



  National transportations Safety Board release the information from the investigation of the deadly collision between the Los Angeles commuter trains to the to a fray train last month. Karen Grigsby Bates reports.



  In its latest update, the NTSB released the * record for major * roberts * as the phone activity on the day of crash. In a first two hours of the * shelf, Sanchez so receive 21 test messages and send 24. During the second half of the shelf, the phone receives 7 test messages and send 5. Record show that the last test was send from the self at 4:24,01 pm. Dead  records aboard the union Pacific train that * crash into indicate the collision a heard 24 seconds later. Soon after the crash, a few team train * told reporter that they've been testing with Sanchez. The NTSB's continuing to coordinate record time from train and single data and engineer self to refine the exact collision time. Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR News.



  And I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.


大家可以叫俺 辣椒 童鞋!
实现无障碍英语沟通

ON ylem                  

 

为什么用EVERYZING啊~感觉很不舒服~不能自己写吗~能写多少算多少~这样参考还有什么意思

 

Practice欢迎回归NPR。

-谈笑

 

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer.

 

Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan. Though from the Florida debate it's clear their own lawmakers will continue to have reservations. From on Independent Senator Bernie Sanders said there's no way he can vote for the bill at least in its current form. “This bill does not address. The major economic crisis we face, growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs rebuilding our infrastructure, and moving us / the energy efficiency and sustainable energy” But others in the Senate stressed the importance of getting the bill through. Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said action needs to be taken, calling it not just a Wall Street but a main street issue.  “A halt from the flow of money threatens / not only Wall Street firms, which would not bring us here today, but what is a dangerous the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan.” Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweeteners including raising the FDIC coverage limit on bank accounts. And putting in place middle class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure. It’s expected that House will take up the bill on Friday.

 

 

 

Even as congressional lawmakers worked toward a financial rescue package, one program geared toward helping troubled homeowners is already under way. Aiming at helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosure, the new program was let in estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages from more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgages to decide whether or not they participate. The qualifier of borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments.

 

 

US companies continued hand out more pink slips in September, that’s according to a new report from Challenger Gray & Christmas. The number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month. NPR's David Nogueras reports.

 

Most of the cuts came in the computer industry. Tech-companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of Titans, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger, chief executive of Challenger Gray & Christmas, says things will only get worse for the financial sector.  “For the year we've seen over 111,000 jobs cuts there. It's the leading sector in the economy and it looks like if the lull before the storm. ” Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US auto-makers he points out have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueras, NPR News.

 

Major auto-makers waited with the September sales numbers today most show double digit declines. Ford says September sales were down more than 34.5%. GM says September sales fell 16%, compared to a year ago. Toyota's sales were down 32%.

 

 

On Wall Street today the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down / 19 points to end the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today.

 

This is NPR.

 

 

Doors at the trial of Alaska senator Ted Stevens today were shown “Thank you!” notes he wrote to an oil pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmakers’ home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes showed that Stephens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of VECO Corporation, a long-time-friend of Stevens, has testified his company paid for the work. Over the notes shown to jurors also discuss home financing bolstering defense attorneys claims. The senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile sent home early today to comedy one member of the jury panel. The government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on Senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts.

 

 

National Transportation Safety Board has released information from its investigation of the deadly collision between Los Angeles commuter train and a freight train last month. Karen Grigsby Bates reports.

 

In its latest update the NTSB released subpoena records from Metrolink engineer Robert Sanchez as his phone activity on the day of the crash. In the first two hours of the split shift, Sanchez’s cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of the shift, the phone received seven text messages and sent five. Records show that the last text was sent from his cell at 4:22:01PM. Data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train, the Metrolink crashed into indicate the collision occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash a few teen train / told a reporter they'd been testing with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data. And the engineer it / to refine the exact collision time, Karen Grigsby Bates NPR news.

 

 And I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 

[ 本帖最后由 cxc-谈笑一生 于 2008-10-5 20:41 编辑 ]
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on practice100

    

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer.

 

Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan. Though from the Florida debate it's clear their own lawmakers will continue to have reservations. From on Independent Senator Bernie Sanders said there's no way he can vote, for the bill at least in its current form. “This bill does not address the major economic crisis we face, growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs, rebuilding our infrastructure, and moving us  the energy efficiency and sustainable energy” But others in the Senate stressed the importance of getting the bill through. Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said action needs to be taken, calling it not just a Wall Street but a main street issue.  “A halt from the flow of money threatens  not only Wall Street firms, which would not bring us here today, but what is a dangerous the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan.” Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweeteners including raising the FDIC coverage limit on bank accounts. And putting in place middle class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure. It’s expected that House will take up the bill on Friday.

 

Even as congressional lawmakers worked toward a financial rescue package, one program geared toward helping troubled homeowners is already under way. Aiming at helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosure, the new program was let in estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages from more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgages to decide whether or not they participate. The qualifier of borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments.

 

 

US companies continued to hand out more pink slips in September, that’s according to a new report from Challenger Gray & Christmas. The number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month. NPR's David Nogueras reports.

 

Most of the cuts came in the computer industry. Tech-companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of Titans, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger, chief executive of Challenger Gray & Christmas, says things will only get worse for the financial sector.  “For the year we've seen over 111,000 jobs cuts there. It's the leading sector in the economy and it looks like if the lull before the storm. ” Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US auto-makers he points out have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueras, NPR News.

 

Major auto-makers waited with the September sales numbers today most show double digit declines. Ford says September sales were down more than 34.5%. GM says September sales fell 16%, compared to a year ago. Toyota's sales were down 32%.

 

On Wall Street today the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 19 points to end the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today.

 

This is NPR.

 

Doors at the trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens today were shown “Thank you!” notes he wrote to an oil pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmakers’ home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes showed that Stephens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of VECO Corporation, a long-time-friend of Stevens, has testified his company paid for the work. Over the notes shown to jurors also discuss home financing bolstering defense attorneys claims. The senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile sent home early today to comedy one member of the jury panel. The government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on Senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts.

 

National Transportation Safety Board has released information from its investigation of the deadly collision between Los Angeles commuter train and a/to freight train last month. Karen Grigsby Bates reports.

 

In its latest update the NTSB released subpoena records from Metrolink engineer Robert Sanchez as his phone activity on the day of the crash. In the first two hours of the split shift, Sanchez’s cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of the shift, the phone received seven text messages and sent five. Records show that the last text was sent from his cell at 4:22:01PM. Data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train, the Metrolink crashed into indicate the collision occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash a few teen train told a reporter they'd been testing with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data. And the engineer itself to refine the exact collision time, Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR news.

 

 And I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

1

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回复 4# 的帖子

谢谢提醒,惭愧ing,再不这样了 感觉对着听确实没效果,拼写还老有错误(俺拼写实在太烂了) 为了抢时间,根本达不到学习的效果(来这里的目的是什么?) 后来的DDMM们,以我为鉴啊!

原帖由 ylem_ail 于 2008-10-2 11:35 发表 谢谢提醒,惭愧ing,再不这样了感觉对着听确实没效果,拼写还老有错误(俺拼写实在太烂了)为了抢时间,根本达不到学习的效果(来这里的目的是什么?)后来的DDMM们,以我为鉴啊!

 

恩,能听懂和能写还是不一样的,所以我觉得PUT的听写,我们就应该自己写,这样才有进步,希望能坚持每天都至少听写一个ST,虽然比较花时间!

实现无障碍英语沟通

hw

From NPR News in Washington, I’m Jack Speer.

 

Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan, though from the Florida debate it’s clear there are lawmakers who continue to have reservations. From our Independent Senator Bernie Sanders said there is no way he can vote for the bill at least in its current form. ‘This bill does not address the major economic crisis we face: growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent-paying jobs. We are building our infrastructure and moving us to energy efficiency and sustainable energy.’ But others in the Senate stress the importance of getting the bill through. Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee said action needs to be taken, calling it not just a Wall Street but a main-street issue. ‘A halt in the flow of money threatens not only Wall Street firms, which would not bring us here today, but what is a dangerous the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan.’

 

Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweeteners including raising the FDIC coverage limit on bank accounts, and putting in place middle-class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure, to expect that the House will take up a the bill on Friday.

 

Even as congressional lawmakers work toward a financial rescue package, one program here toward helping troubled homeowners is already underway, aimed at helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosure. The new program was * an estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages for more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgage to decide whether or not they participate. To qualify, a borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments.

 

US companies continue to handout more pink slips in September, that’s according to new report from challenge Challenger Grey & Christmas. The number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month. NPR’s David Nogueras reports.

 

Most of the cuts came in computer industry, tech companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don’t reflect the fall of Titans, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger, chief executive of Challenger Grey & Christmas says things will only get worse for the financial sector. ‘For the year we’ve seen over 111 thousand job cuts there, it’s the leading sector in the economy. And it looks like a * before the storm.’ Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US automakers he points out have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueras, NPR News.

 

Major automakers * September sales numbers today, most showed double-digit declines. Report says September sales were down more than 34.5%, GM says September sales fell 16% compare to a year ago, Toyota sales were down 32%.

 

On Wall Street today, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 19% to end the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today. This is NPR.

 

Jurors at the trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens today were shown thank you notes he wrote to an oil pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmaker’s home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes show that Stevens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of VECO cooperation a long time friend of Stevens has testified his company paid for the work, over the notes shown that Jurors also discuss home financing bolstering defense attorney’s claims, the senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile, were sent home early today to * at one member of the jury panel, the government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts.

 

National Transportation Safety Boarder’s released information from its investigation of the deadly collision between a Los Angeles commuter train and a ferried train last month. Karen Grigsby Bates reports.

 

In its latest update, the NTSB released subpoena records for Metrolink engineer Robert Sanchez as his phone activity on the day of the crash, in the first two hours of a split shift, Sanchez’s cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of the shift, the phone received 7 text messages and sent 5. Record showed that the last text was sent from the cell at 4:21:01 pm, data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train, the Metrolink crashed into, indicate the collusion occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash, a few * train * told reporter they’ve been texting with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data and the engineer cell to refine the exact collusion time. Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR News.

 

And I’m Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 

普特听力大课堂

on fastslow

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer.

 

Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan. Though from the Florida debate it's clear there are lawmakers who continue to have reservations. From our Independent Senator Bernie Sanders said there's no way he can vote, for the bill at least in its current form. “This bill does not address the major economic crisis we face -- growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs, rebuilding our infrastructure, and moving us  the energy efficiency and sustainable energy”. But others in the Senate stressed the importance of getting the bill through. Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said action needs to be taken, calling it not just a Wall Street but a main street issue.  “A halt from the flow of money threatens not only Wall Street firms, which would not bring us here today, but what is a dangerous the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan.”

 

Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweeteners including raising the FDIC coverage limit on bank accounts, and putting in place middle-class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure. It’s expected that House will take up the bill on Friday.

 

Even as congressional lawmakers worked toward a financial rescue package, one program geared toward helping troubled homeowners is already under way. Aiming at helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosure, the new program was let in estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages from more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgages to decide whether or not they participate. The qualifier of borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments.

 

 

US companies continued to hand out more pink slips in September, that’s according to a new report from Challenger Gray & Christmas. The number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month. NPR's David Nogueras reports.

 

Most of the cuts came in the computer industry. Tech-companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of Titans, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger, chief executive of Challenger Gray & Christmas, says things will only get worse for the financial sector.  “For the year we've seen over 111,000 jobs cuts there. It's the leading sector in the economy and it looks like / the lull before the storm. ” Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US auto-makers, he points out, have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueras, NPR News.

 

Major auto-makers weighed in with the September sales numbers today most show double digit declines. Ford says September sales were down more than 34.5%. GM says September sales fell 16%, compared to a year ago. Toyota's sales were down 32%.

 

On Wall Street today the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 19 points to end the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today.

 

This is NPR.

 

Jurors at the trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens today were shown “Thank you!” notes he wrote to an oil-pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmakers’ home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes show that Stephens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of VECO Corporation a long-time-friend of Stevens has testified his company paid for the work. Over the notes shown to jurors also discuss home financing bolstering defense attorney’s claims. The Senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile sent home early today to comedy one member of the jury panel. The government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on Senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts.

 

National Transportation Safety Board has released information from its investigation of the deadly collision between a Los Angeles commuter train and a freight train last month. Karen Grigsby Bates reports.

 

In its latest update the NTSB released subpoena records from Metrolink engineer Robert Sanchez as his phone activity on the day of the crash. In the first two hours of the split shift, Sanchez’s cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of the shift, the phone received seven text messages and sent five. Record showed that the last text was sent from his cell at 4:22:01PM. Data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train, the Metrolink crashed into indicate the collision occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash a few teen train * told a reporter they'd been texting with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data. And the engineer itself to refine the exact collision time, Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR news.

 

And I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 

我还在,你们在哪里?北星。翩然。芊芊。叶叶。。。。
好栏目推荐之美国口语俚语

on ghance

HOHO, 找到那个词了。。。

 

 

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer.

 

Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan. Though from the Florida debate it's clear there are lawmakers who continue to have reservations. From our Independent Senator Bernie Sanders said there's no way he can vote, for the bill at least in its current form. “This bill does not address the major economic crisis we face -- growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs, rebuilding our infrastructure, and moving us  the energy efficiency and sustainable energy”. But others in the Senate stressed the importance of getting the bill through. Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said action needs to be taken, calling it not just a Wall Street but a main street issue.  “A halt from the flow of money threatens not only Wall Street firms, which would not bring us here today, but what is a dangerous the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan.”

 

Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweeteners including raising the FDIC coverage limit on bank accounts, and putting in place middle-class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure. It’s expected that House will take up the bill on Friday.

 

Even as congressional lawmakers worked toward a financial rescue package, one program geared toward helping troubled homeowners is already under way. Aiming at helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosure, the new program was let in estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages from more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgages to decide whether or not they participate. The qualifier of borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments.

 

 

US companies continued to hand out more pink slips in September, that’s according to a new report from Challenger Gray & Christmas. The number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month. NPR's David Nogueras reports.

 

Most of the cuts came in the computer industry. Tech-companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of Titans, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger, chief executive of Challenger Gray & Christmas, says things will only get worse for the financial sector.  “For the year we've seen over 111,000 jobs cuts there. It's the leading sector in the economy and it looks like the lull before the storm. ” Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US auto-makers, he points out, have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueras, NPR News.

 

Major auto-makers weighed in with the September sales numbers today most show double digit declines. Ford says September sales were down more than 34.5%. GM says September sales fell 16%, compared to a year ago. Toyota's sales were down 32%.

 

On Wall Street today the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 19 points to end the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today.

 

This is NPR.

 

Jurors at the trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens today were shown “Thank you!” notes he wrote to an oil-pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmakers’ home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes show that Stephens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of VECO Corporation a long-time-friend of Stevens has testified his company paid for the work. Over the notes shown to jurors also discuss home financing bolstering defense attorney’s claims. The Senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile sent home early today to comedy one member of the jury panel. The government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on Senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts.

 

National Transportation Safety Board has released information from its investigation of the deadly collision between a Los Angeles commuter train and a freight train last month. Karen Grigsby Bates reports.

 

In its latest update the NTSB released subpoena records from Metrolink engineer Robert Sanchez as his phone activity on the day of the crash. In the first two hours of the split shift, Sanchez’s cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of the shift, the phone received seven text messages and sent five. Record showed that the last text was sent from his cell at 4:22:01PM. Data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train, the Metrolink crashed into indicate the collision occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash a few teen train buffs told a reporter they'd been texting with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data. And the engineer itself to refine the exact collision time, Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR news.

 

And I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

 

 

我还在,你们在哪里?北星。翩然。芊芊。叶叶。。。。

怎么没有什么人气啊,是不是国庆都休息去了

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer. Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan. Though from the Florida debate it's clear there are lawmakers who continue to have reservations. From our Independent Senator Bernie Sanders said there's no way he can vote for the bill at least in its current form. “This bill does not address the major economic crisis we face -- growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs, rebuilding our infrastructure, and moving us the energy efficiency and sustainable energy”. But others in the Senate stressed the importance of getting the bill through. Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said action needs to be taken, calling it not just a Wall Street but a main street issue. “A halt from the flow of money threatens not only Wall Street firms, which would not bring us here today, but what is a dangerous the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan.” Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweeteners including raising the FDIC coverage limit on bank accounts, and putting in place middle-class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure. It’s expected that House will take up the bill on Friday. Even as congressional lawmakers worked toward a financial rescue package, one program geared toward helping troubled homeowners is already under way. Aiming at helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosure, the new program was let in estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages from more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgages to decide whether or not they participate. The qualifier of borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments. US companies continued to hand out more pink slips in September, that’s according to a new report from CGC. The number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month. NPR's David N reports. Most of the cuts came in the computer industry. Tech-companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of Titans, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger, chief executive of CG & Christmas, says things will only get worse for the financial sector. “For the year we've seen over 111,000 jobs cut there. It's the leading sector in the economy and it looks like the lull before the storm. ” Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US auto-makers, he points out, have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueras, NPR News. Major auto-makers weighed in with the September sales numbers today and most show double digit declines. Ford says September sales were down more than 34.5%. GM says September sales fell 16%, compared to a year ago. Toyota's sales were down 32%. On Wall Street today the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 19 points to end the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today. This is NPR. Jurors at the trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens today were shown “Thank you!” notes he wrote to an oil-pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmakers’ home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes show that Stephens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of VECO Corporation a long-time-friend of Stevens has testified his company paid for the work. Over the notes shown to jurors also discuss home financing bolstering defense attorney’s claims. The Senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile sent home early today to comedy one member of the jury panel. The government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on Senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts. National Transportation Safety Board has released information from its investigation of the deadly collision between a Los Angeles commuter train and a freight train last month.KGB reports. In its latest update the NTSB released subpoena records from Metrolink engineer RS as his phone activity on the day of the crash. In the first two hours of the split shift, S’s cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of the shift, the phone received seven text messages and sent five. Record showed that the last text was sent from his cell at 4:22:01PM. Data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train the Metrolink crashed into indicate the collision occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash a few teen train b told a reporter they'd been texting with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data. And the engineer itself to refine the exact collision time, Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR news.
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每天半小时 轻松提高英语口语

on ghance

From NPR News in Washington, I'm Jack Speer.

 

Senate lawmakers are moving toward a vote tonight on a revised 700-billion-dollar financial rescue plan, though from the floor debate it's clear there are lawmakers who continue to have reservations. Vermont independent Senator Bernie Sanders said there's no way he can vote for the bill at least in its current form. "This bill does not address the major economic crisis we face: growing unemployment, low wages and the need to create decent paying jobs, rebuilding our infrastructure, and moving us to energy efficiency and sustainable energy". But others in the Senate stressed the importance of getting the bill through. Connecticut Democrat Chris Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, said action needs to be taken, calling it not just a Wall Street but a main street issue.  "A halt from the flow of money threatens not only Wall Street firms, which would not bring us here today, but what is a danger is the way of life for millions of Americans far beyond lower Manhattan." Leaders in both parties are predicting the several sweeteners including raising the FDIC coverage limit on bank accounts, and putting in place middle-class tax breaks will help speed passage of the measure. It's expected the House will take up the bill on Friday.

 

Even as congressional lawmakers work toward a financial rescue package, one program geared toward helping troubled homeowners is already under way. Aimed at helping prevent additional mortgage holders from falling into foreclosure, the new program will let an estimated 400,000 homeowners swap their current mortgages from more affordable loans. It will be up to banks holding the mortgages to decide whether or not they participate. The qualified \ borrower must be spending more than 31% of their income on mortgage payments.

 

 

US companies continued to hand out more pink slips in September. Thats according to a new report from Challenger Gray & Christmas. The number of announced layoffs rose 7.2% last month. NPR's David Nogueras reports.

 

Most of the cuts came in the computer industry. Tech-companies eliminated more than 25,000 jobs in September. By comparison, financial services companies cut just over 8,000 jobs. But those numbers don't reflect the fall of Titans, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. John Challenger, chief executive of Challenger Gray & Christmas, says things will only get worse for the financial sector.  "For the year we've seen over 111,000 jobs cuts there. It's the leading sector in the economy and it looks like the lull before the storm." Challenger says troubles on Wall Street are largely overshadowing cuts in the auto industry. US auto-makers, he points out, have cut 75,000 jobs just this summer. David Nogueras, NPR News.

 

Major auto-makers weighed in with their September sales numbers today. Most showed double-digit declines. Ford says September sales were down more than 34.5%. GM says September sales fell 16%, compared to a year ago. Toyota's sales were down 32%.

 

On Wall Street today the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 19 points to end the session at 10,831. The NASDAQ lost 22 points today.

 

This is NPR.

 

Jurors at the trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens today were shown "Thank you" notes he wrote to an oil-pipeline contractor who oversaw work at the lawmakers' home. Federal prosecutors contend the notes show that Stevens was where he was getting renovations carried out on his Alaska home for free. Bill Allen of VECO Corporation, a long-time-friend of Stevens, has testified his company paid for the work. However the notes shown to jurors also discussed home financing, bolstering defense attorney's claims the senator intended to pay for the project. Jurors meanwhile were sent home early today to accommodate one member of the jury panel. The government alleges the Alaska Republican lied on Senate forms about receiving 250,000 dollars in gifts.

 

National Transportation Safety Board has released new information from its investigation of the deadly collision between a Los Angeles commuter train and a freight train last month. Karen Grigsby Bates reports.

 

In its latest update, the NTSB released subpoenaed records from Metrolink engineer Robert Sanchez's phone activity on the day of the crash. In the first two hours of the split shift, Sanchez's cell received 21 text messages and sent 24. During the second half of the shift, the phone received seven text messages and sent five. Record showed that the last text was sent from his cell at 4:22:01PM. Data recorders aboard the Union Pacific train the Metrolink crashed into indicate the collision occurred 22 seconds later. Soon after the crash a few teen train buffs told a reporter they'd been texting with Sanchez. The NTSB is continuing to coordinate recorded times from train and signal data and the engineer's cell to refine the exact collision time. Karen Grigsby Bates, NPR News.

 

And I'm Jack Speer, NPR News in Washington.

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