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[BBC] 【整理】BBC 2008-10-08

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Médecins Sans Frontières, (Doctors Without Borders) is a secular humanitarian-aid non-governmental organization best known for its projects in war-torn regions and developing countries facing endemic disease. [ 本帖最后由 brightu 于 2008-10-8 20:18 编辑 ]
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All sunshine without shade, all pleasure without pain, is not life at all.

on dribble

BBC News with Jerry Schmitt.

The British government is expected to disclose its rescue package for the country's beleaguered banks in a few hours time. It follows another day of turmoil for British bank shares. The rescue deal is understood to involve injecting billions of pounds into the banks, so they have enough cash to fund day-to-day operations. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Alistair Darling, said he would make a statement before the financial markets opened on Wednesday.

The Bank of England has been putting substantial sums into the markets and it is ready to do more when that's needed. Now as I said in the House of Commons on Monday, we've been working closely with the governor of the Bank of England with the Financial Services Authority and financial institutions to put the banks on a longer-term sound footing. Now I intend to make a statement before the markets open tomorrow morning and I will make a statement in the House of Commons later in the day.

President Bush is urging common action to tackle the global financial crisis. He says he's willing to attend a summit to the world's leading industrialized nations. Stocks in the United States have once again plunged as concerns mounted over the spiraling credit crunch. Andy Gallagher reports from Washington.

Despite the optimistic words of President Bush who told a group of small business owners that the American economy would recover, US stocks suffered from yet another abysmal day's trading. Stocks plunged over fears that the continuing credit crisis would drag the US economy into a deep recession. And the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost another 500 points remaining below the ten thousand mark. Moves by the Federal Reserve to buy up short-term debt failed to restore confidence. And over the last five days, the Dow Jones has seen its biggest point loss ever. One economist has been quoted as saying "it's no longer whether there is a recession, but how severe it will be."

In Iceland where two of the biggest banks have been nationalized in the past few days, the Prime Minister Geir Haarde has complained that his country's traditional allies failed to offer financial support when it was needed most. Mr. Haarde said he had been forced to turn to Russia for a multi-billion-dollar loan.

We will be sending people to Moscow today or tomorrow to negotiate with / Russia on the terms and conditions on this loan which will be on addition to our foreign currency reserves and not intended to be left onwards to any financial institutions.

A United States Federal judge has ordered the Government to free 17 detainees from the Guantanamo Bay prison camp onto American soil, the first such order since the military jail opened in 2002. The judge, Ricardo Urbina, said the group, Muslim Chinese Uighurs, who have been held without charge for seven years, should be brought to Washington. The US Justice Department said it would immediately appeal against the decision.

You are listening to World News from the BBC.

American voters will shortly have the chance to put questions about the financial crisis to the two presidential candidates. Their latest television debate opens in a few hours in Nashville, Tennessee. The Democratic Party candidate Barack Obama and
the Republican John McCain will answer a selection of questions from viewers. Kevin Connolly reports from Nashville.

The two presidential candidates meet in the home of country music, during the kind of hard times for American families which have traditionally inspired country composers. As the gap between the candidates widens, the tone of campaign becomes much sharper, but the format for tonight's debate is a town hall meeting, a kind of folksy dialogue with undecided voters, which makes it difficult to land knockout punches, that, though, is precisely what John McCain needs to do, as time begins to run out for him.

The medical charity, Médecins Sans Frontières, says tens of thousands of displaced people in the Democratic
Republic of Congo have fled after renewed fighting. Peter Greste reports from Nairobi.

For months now, an estimated quarter of a million people in Congo have been on the move, fleeing the patchwork of militias engaged in increasing violent clashes. The displaced civilians congregated in camps across North Kivu province where agencies like Médecins Sans Frontières have been helping with food, shelter and medical aid. But since the end of August, fighting has escalated into what MSF has described as full-scale war, and many of those people have been forced to run once more. Now, MSF says of the 100,000 people it had been supporting in one part of the North Kivu, it can only find 25,000.

A research team in the United States has published new data suggesting that
/ male circumcision has no significant protective effect against HIV infection amongst men who have sex with men. Correspondents say the findings will add to the on-going debate about the impact of circumcision on HIV transmission. 

BBC News.

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发错地方了吧   ---brightu

 

I’m David Deforest from the VOA News Center in Washington.

Global stock markets are posting mix
ed results today, a key stock index in Hong Kong was down 5 percent at the close of trading, but Taiwan and Korea made gains. Today traders are reacting to an interest rate cut by Australia Central Bank and maybe hoping other central banks will follow suit in the effort to ease the tight credit market. European markets meanwhile are reacting nervously again as the banking crisis continues to worry many. Tom Rivers reports from London.

Well, financial jitters were felt right across Europe Tuesday, European stocks generally posted moderate gains on hopes that central banks will cut interest rate soon. Also improving the moods slightly is
the decision by European Union finance ministers to guarantee bank deposits up to 68,000 dollars. For the second day in the roll banking stocks in particular faced a rough ride. In Briton the Royal Bank of Scotland shed over at over 40% of its values at one stage. At issue were questions over the institution’s liquidity and solvency. Mark Sounders the chief UK economist at
 City Group says the effect of problem will take time to resolve and will require a multiple approach.
So, mix a public central recapitalization of the banks, emergency liquidity supports the banks and lower interests to help to pull our economy.

In Iceland the board of directors of Lands Banky, the country’s second largest bank has been dismissed. And the institution placed in the receivership. The country is also negotiating a 5.4-billion-dollar loan from Russia to shore up the nation’s finances as it faces a severe financial crisis. Tom Rivers for VOA News, London

Pakistani officials have ordered Afghan refugees out of the country’s border tribal area. Pakistani authorities today began enforcing an order for Afghans to leave the Bajaur tribal region accusing the refugees of having links to militants in the area. Pakistani troops have been targeting /
Al-Qaeda and Taliban linked militants in Bajaur for several weeks killing at least a thousand militants so far. Officials today said at least 40 Afghans have been arrested and would be deported to their homeland. Some Afghan-owned shops in the tribal area also were shut down. Afghanistan
’s government has denied media reports that it has been holding talks with the Taliban. VOA correspondent Steve Herman reports from Kabul.

Afghanistan has denied talks had been held with the Taliban or
its intermediaries. The denial follows reports that representatives of the insurgents who were former Taliban officials met with Afghan government officials who
are part of Saudi royal mediation effort late last month. Presidential spokesman Homayoon Hamedzada told reporters that while President Hamid Karzai has asked the Saudi King to arrange such discussions, they have not yet occurred.

The government of Afghanistan is open to speaking with anyone and the opposition and the people who are fighting against the Afghan people and the Afghan government, but no such talk
s(口误
) has happened as off yet.

Media reports in the region have also quoted a Taliban spokesman denied that peace talks have taken place. Steve Herman, VOA News. Kabul.

Iraq’s foreign minister says his country is “very close” to finalizing an agreement with the United States that would allow American troops to remain in the country beyond / 2008. Hoshyar Zebari discussed the progress of / negotiations between Baghdad and Washington today during a joint press conference with US Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte. The two sides have been working on an agreement that would keep US forces in Iraq after the United Nation’s mandate for the multi-national forces expires December 31. But they have been divided over the issue of granting US servicemen immunity for crimes committed in Iraq.

US public opinion poll showed that Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama has widened a lead over Republican rival John McCain ahead of a high stakes debate today. A Washington Post ABC News poll released today found Obama ahead of McCain 51 to 45 in the mid-western state of Ohio, a key state in the race for the White House. The poll said respondents give Obama higher marks on handling the economy and bringing change to Washington. A CNN poll found that Obama leads McCain 53 to 45 percent, double his lead from a September survey. But another nation wide poll by Reuters, C-Span and Zogby puts Obama in the lead by just three percentage points. Senator McCain and Senator Obama will debate tonight in Nashville, Tennessee.

U.S. stock indexes are up at this hour, I’m David Deforest. More news on the Internet atvoanews.com

 

[ 本帖最后由 brightu 于 2008-10-9 06:31 编辑 ]
实现无障碍英语沟通

HW

 

The British Government is expected to his closest rescue package for the country's beleaguered banks in a few hours time. It follows another day of turmoil for British Bank shares.The rescue deal is understood to involving injecting billions of pounds into the banks save they have not cash to fund day to day operation.  The Chancellor of the Exchequer Alistair Darling said he will make statement before the financial markets opened on Wednesday."The bank in England has been put substantial sums into the markets and it's ready to do more when that's needed.Now, as I said that in the House of Commons Monday we have been working closely with the governor for bank of England with financial services authority and financial institutions to put the banks on a longer terms sound footing. I intend to make statement before the markets open tomorrow morning.And I will make statement of House of commons late in the day."


President Bush is urging common action to tackle the global financial crisis.He says he's willing to attend the summit to the world's leading industrialized nations. Stocks in the United States once again plunged as concerned mounted overt the spiraling credit crunch. Andy Goher reports from Washington.


Despite the optimistic words of President Bush who told the group of small business owner that American economy   would recover. US stocks suffered yet another dismal day's trading. stock plunged over the fear that continuing credit crisis would drag the US economy into a deep recession. The Dow Jones Industrial Average losed another 500 points remain below the 3000 mark.


Moves by Federal Reserve to buy a short-term debt failed to restore confidence and over the last five days Dow Jones seens biggest its point lose ever. One economist has been quoted as saying its no longer whether there is a recession. But how severe it would be.


In iceland where two the biggest banks be nationalized is the pass few days.The Prime Minister Geir Haarde has complained that it's country's traditional allies failed to offer financial support when it was needed most. Mr.Haarde said he has been forced to turn to Russia to a multi-billion dollar loan.


"We have been sending paper to Moscow in today or tomorrow to negotiate with Russia on the terms and conditions on this loan which would be additional toward our continent current reserves and not intended to be left onwards to financial institution."


The United States Federal Judge has ordered the government to free 17 detainees from the Guantanamo Bay prison camp onto American soil, The first such order since the military jail opened in 2002. The judge  Ricardo M. Urbina said the group, Muslim Chinese Uighurs, who've been hold without charge for seven years, should be brought to Washington. The US. justice department said he would immediately appeal against the decision.


You are listening to World News from the BBC.


American votors will shortly have chance to put questions about financial crisis to the two presidential candidates. The latest television debate open in a few hours in Nashville, the democratic party candidate Barack Obama and the Republican John McCain will answer a section question from viewers. Kevin Connolly reports from Nashville.


The two presidential candidates meet in the home of country music druing the climate of hard times for American families, which traditionally inspired country composers. As the cap between candidates widens, the tone of campaign becomes much sharper.But the format for tonight's debate in town hall meeting, a kind of folksy dialogue with undecided voters which make it difficult to land knockout punches, that though, is precisely what John McCain needs to do as time begins to run out for him.


 The medical charity Medicine San Frontiers says tens of thousands of displaced people in the Democratic Republican of Congo have fled after renewed fighting. Peter Grasta reports from Nairobi.

 

For months now, an estimated quarter of a million people in Congo have been on the move, fleeing the patchwork of militias engaged in increasing violent clashes. The displaced civilians congregated in camps across north K/ province where agencies like Medicine San Frontiers have been helping with food, shelter and medical aid. But since the end of August, fighting has escalated into what MSF has described as full-scale war. And many of those people have been forced to run once more. Now, MSF says of the hundred thousand people it had been supporting in one part of the northern K/ it can only find 25 000.

 

 A research team in the United States has published new data suggesting that the male circumcision has no significant protective effects against HIV infection among men who have sex with men. Correspondents say the findings will add to the on-going debate about the impact of circumcision on HIV transmission. 

 

BBC news for today.

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on jjmm

BBC News with Jerry Schmitt.

The British government is expected to disclose its rescue package for the country's beleaguered banks in a few hours time. It follows another day of turmoil for British bank shares. The rescue deal is understood to involve injecting billions of pounds into the banks, so they have enough cash to fund day-to-day operations. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Alistair Darling, said he would make a statement before the financial markets opened on Wednesday.

The Bank of England has been putting substantial sums into the markets and it is ready to do more when that's needed. Now as I said in the House of Commons on Monday, we've been working closely with the governor of the Bank of England with the Financial Services Authority and financial institutions to put the banks on a longer-term sound footing. Now I intend to make a statement before the markets open tomorrow morning and I will make a statement in the House of Commons later in the day.

President Bush is urging common action to tackle the global financial crisis. He says he's willing to attend a summit to the world's leading industrialized nations. Stocks in the United States have once again plunged as concerns mounted over the spiraling credit crunch. Andy Gallagher reports from Washington.

Despite the optimistic words of President Bush who told a group of small business owners that the American economy would recover, US stocks suffered from yet another abysmal day's trading. Stocks plunged over fears that the continuing credit crisis would drag the US economy into a deep recession. And the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost another 500 points remaining below the ten thousand mark. Moves by the Federal Reserve to buy up short-term debt failed to restore confidence. And over the last five days, the Dow Jones has seen its biggest point loss ever. One economist has been quoted as saying "it's no longer whether there is a recession, but how severe it will be."

In Iceland where two of the biggest banks have been nationalized in the past few days, the Prime Minister Geir Haarde has complained that his country's traditional allies failed to offer financial support when it was needed most. Mr. Haarde said he had been forced to turn to Russia for a multi-billion-dollar loan.

We will be sending people to Moscow today or tomorrow to negotiate with / Russia on the terms and conditions on this loan which will be on addition to our foreign currency reserves and not intended to be left onwards to any financial institutions.

A United States Federal judge has ordered the government to free 17 detainees from the Guantanamo Bay prison camp onto American soil, the first such order since the military jail opened in 2002. The judge, Ricardo Urbina, said the group, Muslim Chinese Uighurs, who have been held without charge for seven years, should be brought to Washington. The US Justice Department said it would immediately appeal against the decision.

You are listening to World News from the BBC.

American voters will shortly have the chance to put questions about the financial crisis to the two presidential candidates. Their latest television debate opens in a few hours in Nashville, Tennessee. The Democratic Party candidate Barack Obama and
the Republican John McCain will answer a selection of questions from viewers. Kevin Connolly reports from Nashville.

The two presidential candidates meet in the home of country music, during the kind of hard times for American families which have traditionally inspired country composers. As the gap between the candidates widens, the tone of campaign becomes much sharper, but the format for tonight's debate is a town hall meeting, a kind of folksy dialogue with undecided voters, which makes it difficult to land knockout punches, that, though, is precisely what John McCain needs to do, as time begins to run out for him.

The medical charity, Médecins Sans Frontières, says tens of thousands of displaced people in the Democratic
Republic of Congo have fled after renewed fighting. Peter Greste reports from Nairobi.

For months now, an estimated quarter of a million people in the Congo have been on the move, fleeing the patchwork of militias engaged in increasing violent clashes. The displaced civilians congregated in camps across North Kivu province where agencies like Médecins Sans Frontières have been helping with food, shelter and medical aid. But since the end of August, fighting has escalated into what MSF has described as full-scale war, and many of those people have been forced to run once more. Now, MSF says of the 100,000 people it had been supporting in one part of the North Kivu, it can only find 25,000.

A research team in the United States has published new data suggesting that
male circumcision has no significant protective effect against HIV infection amongst men who have sex with men. Correspondents say the findings will add to the on-going debate about the impact of circumcision on HIV transmission. 

BBC News.

All sunshine without shade, all pleasure without pain, is not life at all.

原帖由 大风 于 2008-10-8 19:56 发表   建议头贴可以将人名或者地名空着,因为每个人的水平不一样,如果一定要求查人名的会打击“初学者”的积极性,这里不会是说初学者就不允许发头贴(当然是完整的,不是故意的抢)。后面的桐子可以更正,就像 ...

 

my dear, 偶说酌情扣分的意思是本来你可以拿到12的扣2分拿10分,偶哪敢引起公愤撒...

到目前为止,偶只给过两次负分,一次3分,一次10分,都是因为抄袭的原因,扣三分是因为那位桐子那时候只有3分贡献值,扣十分是一次警告,老实说,偶是想说有多少扣多少滴,但是下不了这个手...

on brightu

 

BBC News with Jerry Schmitt.

The British government is expected to disclose its rescue package for the country's beleaguered banks in a few hours
time. It follows another day of turmoil for British bank shares. The rescue deal is understood to involve injecting billions of pounds into the banks, so they have enough cash to fund day-to-day operations. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Alistair Darling, said he would make a statement before the financial markets opened on Wednesday.

The Bank of England has been putting substantial sums into the markets and it is ready to do more when that's needed. Now as I said in the House of Commons on Monday, we've been working closely with the governor of the Bank of England with the Financial Services Authority and financial institutions to put the banks on a longer-term sound footing. Now I intend to make a statement before the markets open tomorrow morning and I will make a statement in the House of Commons later in the day.

President Bush is urging common action to tackle the global financial crisis. He says he's willing to attend
the summit to the world's leading industrialized nations. Stocks in the United States have once again plunged as concerns mounted over the spiraling credit crunch. Andy Gallagher reports from Washington.

Despite the optimistic words of President Bush who told a group of small business owners that the American economy would recover, US stocks suffered from yet another abysmal day's trading. Stocks plunged over fears that the continuing credit crisis would drag the US economy into a deep recession. And the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost another 500 points remaining below the ten thousand mark. Moves by the Federal Reserve to buy up short-term debt failed to restore confidence. And over the last five days, the Dow Jones has seen its biggest point loss ever. One economist has been quoted as saying "it's no longer whether there is a recession, but how severe it will be."

In Iceland where two of the biggest banks have been nationalized in the past few days, the Prime Minister Geir Haarde has complained that his country's traditional allies failed to offer financial support when it was needed most. Mr. Haarde said he had been forced to turn to Russia for a multi-billion-dollar loan.

We will be sending people to Moscow today or tomorrow to negotiate with Russia on the terms and conditions on this loan which will be
in addition to our foreign currency reserves and not intended to be left onwards to any financial institutions.

A United States Federal judge has ordered the government to free 17 detainees from the Guantanamo Bay prison camp onto American soil, the first such order since the military jail opened in 2002. The judge, Ricardo Urbina, said the group, Muslim Chinese Uighurs, who have been held without charge for seven years, should be brought to Washington. The US Justice Department said it would immediately appeal against the decision.

You are listening to World News from the BBC.

American voters will shortly have the chance to put questions about the financial crisis to the two presidential candidates. Their latest television debate opens in a few hours in Nashville, Tennessee. The Democratic Party candidate Barack Obama and the Republican John McCain will answer a selection of questions from viewers. Kevin Connolly reports from Nashville.

The two presidential candidates meet in the home of country music, during the kind of hard times for American families which have traditionally inspired country composers. As the gap between the candidates widens, the tone of campaign becomes much sharper, but the format for tonight's debate is a town hall meeting, a kind of folksy dialogue with undecided voters, which makes it difficult to land knockout punches, that, though, is precisely what John McCain needs to do, as time begins to run out for him.

The medical charity, Médecins Sans Frontières, says tens of thousands of displaced people in the Democratic Republic of Congo have fled after renewed fighting. Peter Greste reports from Nairobi.

For months now, an estimated quarter of a million people in the Congo have been on the move, fleeing the patchwork of militias engaged in increasing violent clashes. The displaced civilians congregated in camps across North Kivu province where agencies like Médecins Sans Frontières have been helping with food, shelter and medical aid. But since the end of August, fighting has escalated into what MSF has described as full-scale war, and many of those people have been forced to run once more. Now, MSF says of the 100,000 people it had been supporting in one part of the North Kivu, it can only find 25,000.

A research team in the United States has published new data suggesting that male circumcision has no significant protective effect against HIV infection amongst men who have sex with men. Correspondents say the findings will add to the on-going debate about the impact of circumcision on HIV transmission. 

BBC News.

 

 

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