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标题: [科学美国人60秒] 【整理】SSS 2009-07-30 [打印本页]

作者: qingchengshan    时间: 2009-7-31 08:00     标题: 【整理】SSS 2009-07-30

本帖最后由 ljdsoft 于 2009-8-1 00:12 编辑

SSS 20090730

sss


Tune in every weekday for quick reports and commentaries on the world of science-- it will just take a minute.


A study in the journal Psychological Science finds that reading about an activity activates the same brain regions involved in performing that activity. Karen Hopkin reports


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Remember Dick and Jane? And their dog Spot? Maybe you read about them in first grade. See Spot run. Run, Spot, run! Well, a new study in the journal Psychological Science suggests that not only did you see Spot run, but you ran, too. At least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing.

For years, scientists have suspected that our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behavioral studies, people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal react more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than when told to, say, pat their heads. Now, researchers have used real-time brain-imaging techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. Twenty-eight subjects took in tales from a day in the life of Raymond, a seven-year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough, when Raymond scurries to his school desk, cells in the readers’ brains that govern scurrying also spring to life.

Fortunately, the copycatting is confined to the brain—we don’t actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn’t want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.

 

—Karen Hopkin


作者: kinglimk    时间: 2009-7-31 08:31

本帖最后由 kinglimk 于 2009-7-31 08:33 编辑



HW


This is Scientific American’s 60-second Science. I’m Karen Hopkin. This will just take a minute.

Remember digging jam in the dog’s spot, maybe you read about \ first \. See spots run, run spots run. Well, a new study in Journal Psychological Science suggests that not only did your see spots run, but you ran too, at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain region that controls doing that thing. For years scientists have suspected that our brains simulated the activities we read about. In behavior study, people who are reading about soccer and soccer goat, will act more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion, then went on to say pat your heads. Now researchers have used real time brain imaging technologies to watch what happen when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tale form a day and life for freeman, a 7-year- old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough, when \ scurry to his school desk, shef in the reader’s brain that govern scurry also spring to live. Fortunately, the copy canny is confined to brain, we don’t actually act dully the thing we read about. If we did, you wouldn’t wanna say next to someone skinning their daily paper.

Thanks for the minute, for Scientific Ameican’s 60-second Science, I’m Karen Hopkin.

作者: RenatusPausini    时间: 2009-7-31 09:10

本帖最后由 RenatusPausini 于 2009-7-31 09:20 编辑

Homework of Renatus Pausini
This is SA, SSS. I am ~. This will just take a minute.

Remember DJ in the Dark Spot. Maybe you read about them in your first grade. See Spot run, run Spot run. Well, a new study in the journal Psychological Science suggests that not only did you see spot run, but you ran too, at least in your mind, because reading about something turns on the same brain region that control doing that thing. For years, scientists have suspected our brains simulate the activity we read about. In behavioral studies people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal, we act it more quickly when ask to make a kicking motion than when / to say pat their hats. Now, researchers have used real time brain imaging technics to watch what happens when people read a story. Twenty eight subjects took entails from a day of life of R, a seven-year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough, when R scurries to his school desk, cells in the regions of brain that govern scurrying also spring to life. Fortunately, the ~ is confined to the brain. We don’t actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn’t sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.

Thanks for the minute. For SA, SSS, I am ~.
作者: akifu622    时间: 2009-7-31 09:25

hw
This is scientific American's sss. I'm Karen Hopkin.This will just take a minute.
Remember digging jam in the dog's spot. Maybe you read about them in first grade. See spot run, run spot run. Well, a new study in the Journal Psychological Science suggested that not only did you see spots run, but you ran, too, at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing. For years, scientists have been suspected that our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behavioral studies, people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal, we act more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than one told to say, pat their heads. Now researchers have used real time brain emerging techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tales from a day in the life of Raymond. A 7-year-old boy who does things, like get out of the bed, and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough when Raymond scurries to his school desk, cells in the readers' brain that govern scurrying also spring to life. Fortunately, the copy canning is confined to the brain, we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did,it you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.
Thanks for the minute. For scientific Americans,sss. I'm KAren Hopkin
作者: nolose    时间: 2009-7-31 09:38

Remember Dicken Jane and her dog’s bark, maybe you read about them in the first grade. “***” while a new study in the journal of phycological science suggests that not only did your * but you run too at least in your mind because reading about something turns on the same brain region that control doing that thing.
For years, scientists have suspected that our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behaviour studies, people who are reading about score in a soccer goal. We act more quickly when we are asked to make a kicking motion than when told to say patter heads now researchers have used real time brain * techoniques to watch what happens when people read a story.
28 subjects took in tails from a day and life of Rament, a 7 year-old who does things like get out of bed and sit through an english lesson. Sure enough when Rament scurry to his school desk. Cells in the reader’s brain that G scurrying also spring to life. Fortunately the copy cannying is confined to the brain we don't actually act out things that we read about. If we did, you wouldn’t want to sit next to someone skimming their daily paper
作者: summer114    时间: 2009-7-31 09:49

本帖最后由 summer114 于 2009-7-31 11:56 编辑

HW
This is scientific American's 60 seconds science, I'm Karen Hopkin, this'll just take a minute.

Remember Diking Jing and their dog spot, maybe you've read about them in first grade. See spot run, run spot run. Well, a new study in the Journal Psychological Science suggests that not only did you see spot run but you ran too, at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing. For years, scientists have suspected that our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behavioral studies, people who are reading about scoring a soccer go, we act more quickly when estimate a kicking motion then we are told to say pass their heads. Now researchers have used real-time brain imaging techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tails from a day of life Ramond. A 7 year old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through a English lesson, sure enough when Ramond scurries to his school desk sells in readers brains that Goven scurrying also spring to life. Fortunately, the copycattings can find to the brain, we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.

Thanks for the minute, for scientific American's 60 seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.
作者: 小长脖鹿    时间: 2009-7-31 10:39

本帖最后由 小长脖鹿 于 2009-7-31 10:42 编辑

on summer114

This is scientific American's 60 seconds science, I'm Karen Hopkin, this will just take a minute.

Remember Dick and Jane and their dog Spot, maybe you read about them in first grade. See Spot run, run Spot run. Well, a new study in the Journal Psychological Science suggests that not only did you see Spot run but you ran too, at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing. For years, scientists have suspected that our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behavioral studies, people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal, we act more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than when told to say, pat their heads. Now researchers have used real-time brain imaging techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. Twenty-eight subjects took entails from a day and life of Raymond, a seven year old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through a English lesson, sure enough when Raymond scurries to his school desk cells in readers brains that governs scurrying also spring to life. Fortunately, the copycattings is confined to the brain, we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.

Thanks for the minute, for scientific American's 60 seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

作者: februaryheat    时间: 2009-7-31 11:32

on 小长脖鹿

This is scientific American's 60-second science, I'm Karen Hopkin, this will just take a minute.

Remember Dick and Jane and their dog Spot, maybe you read about them in first grade. See Spot run, run Spot run. Well, a new study in the Journal Psychological Science suggests that not only did you see Spot run but you ran too, at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing. For years, scientists have suspected that our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behavioral studies, people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal, we act more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than when told to say, pat their heads. Now researchers have used real-time brain imaging techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. Twenty-eight subjects took entails from a day and life of Raymond, a seven year old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson, sure enough when Raymond scurries to his school desk cells in the readers' brains that govern scurrying also spring to life. Fortunately, the copycatting is confined to the brain, we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.

Thanks for the minute, for scientific American's 60-second science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

作者: summer114    时间: 2009-7-31 11:57

7# 小长脖鹿


thanks~~~
作者: xiaoyingzhou    时间: 2009-7-31 12:07

HW
Remember ** and dog’s bark maybe read about them first grade. Sees about run, run about run. Well, a new study in the Journal of Psychological Science suggests that not only sees about run, but you run, too, at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing. For years, scientists suspect that brain simulate the activities    we read about it, and behaviors. Study about people who will reading about scoring a soccer goal, we act more quickly and make a kick motion then when told to say patter heads. Now researchers use real time brain technique to watch what happen when people read a story. Twenty eight subjects took tails from a day and night event. A seven year old boy who does thing like get up bed and sit through English lesson. Sure enough when one man read scurry at schools desk, cells of readers’ brain that govern scurrying also spring to live. Fortunately, the copy can * fight the brain, we don’t actually act out what we read about it. If we did, you won’t wanna sit next to someone skimming daily paper.
作者: ggc1860    时间: 2009-7-31 14:25

本帖最后由 ggc1860 于 2009-7-31 15:23 编辑

Homework

This is scientific of american 60 second sceince. I'm karen Hopkin. This will just take a minute.

Remember digging jam in the dog's spot, maybe you read it about them in first grade, see spots run, runs spots run. Well, a new study in the journal psychological science suggested that not only did you see spots run, buy you ran too, at least in your mind, because reading about something turns on the same brain region that control doing that thing. For year scientist have suspected that our brains simulated the activities we read about. In behavior studys, people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal, will act more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than when went on to say pat your head. Now researches used real time brain imaging technique to watch what happens when people read a story, 28 subjects took entails from a day of life for freeman, a 7 year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through in an english lesson. Sure enough when Raymond scurries to his school desk, cells in the regions brain that govern scurrying also spring to life. Fortunately the copycatting is confined to the brain, we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.

Thanks for the minute, for scientific American's 60 second sceince. I'm Karen Hopkin.
作者: vincent_put    时间: 2009-7-31 15:55

HW
Remember / and her dog’s bark Spot? Maybe u read about them in the first grade. See Spot run, run Spot run. Well, a new study in the Journal of Psychological Science suggests that not only did u see Spot run, but you run, too, / in ur mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing. For years, scientists has suspected that / are bring simulate activities we read about. In behavioral studise, people who were reading about score an soccer goal, we act more quickly as make a kick motion that one told to say / heads. Now researchers has used real time brain imaging techniques to watch what happened when people read  story. Twenty eight subjects took in /  from a day and night of R, a seven year old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through English lesson. Sure enough when R is scary to his school desk, cells of readers’ brain that govern scarying also spring to live. Fortunately, the copy can / is confined to the brain, we don’t actually act out the thing that we read about it. If we did, you wouldn't wanna sit next to someone skimming daily paper.
作者: huangdan620abc    时间: 2009-7-31 16:37

There is Scentific America 60 second's science.I'm *.just take a minute.Remeber Jane and dog ,maybeyou read them about first grade .seas run,runs but run.While,a new study journal logical science sugest not only did you see *run,but you run too.your mind,because reading about something turn on the same brain region that control for doing that thing.For years,scientists suspect our brain similar activity in read about.In behavior study,people who were reading some .Ww have more quickly take motion  than. Now research use brain technque to watch what happen in people read a story .28 subject took in,a 7-year-old boy who does getting off the bed  English lesson,sure enough when in scool desk,scarcing also spring the life.We don't actually get out we read about.If we did,you wouldn't see someone paper.Thanks for a minute.
作者: chineselady    时间: 2009-7-31 18:13

HW 细节地方很不好听出的 汗

Remember D and J in their dogs spot may be you remember them in first grade see spot run, run spot run. Well a new study in a Journal Psychological Science suggested how that not only did you see the spot run but you run too. At least in your mind because reading about something turns on the same brain region that control doing that thing. For years scientists suspected our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behavior study people who are reading about scoring the sucker goal. We act more quickly taking motion than told to say packing their heads. Now researchers are refusing use to real time brain machine watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in a tale from a diamond of remend . A 7 years boy who does the same thing like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough, when ..enough to us, cells in readers’ brain that scoring also spring to the life. Fortunately the copy … find in brain. We don’t
think we act out things we read about, If we did, you would not want to sit to some one screaming ..to the daily paper


作者: 有钱小女巫    时间: 2009-8-2 19:18

HW:

This is Science American's 60-Second Science. I'm Karen Hopkin. This will just take a minute.

Remember Dick and Jane? And their dog Spot? Maybe you read about them in first grade. See Spot run, run, Spot, run! Well, a new study in the journal Psychological Science suggested that not only did you see Spot run, but you ran, tooat least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing.

For years, scientists have suspected that our brain simulate the activities we read about. In behavior studies, people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal react more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than when told to, say, pat their heads.

Now researchers use real-time brain-imaging techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tales from a day in life of Raymond, a 7-year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough, when Raymond scurries to his school desk, cells in the reader’s brain that govern scurrying also spring to life.

Fortunately, the copycatting盲目模仿 is confined to the brain--we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.

Thanks for the minute for Science American's 60-Second Science. I'm
Karen Hopkin.

作者: mucheqiu    时间: 2009-8-3 09:29

HOMEWORK
This is scientific Americans’ sixty second science. I’m Karen Hopkin. This will just take a minute.
Remember Deanking Jean, in the dog spot. Maybe read them in the first grade. See sport run, run sport run. Well, a new study in the Journal psychological science suggests that not only you see the sport run but you ran too. And listen your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing.  
For years, scientists have suspected the our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behavior  studies, people who were reading about scoring a soccer girl, we add more quickly what we are asked to make a kicking motion then mental will say “patter heads”. Now researchers of views bring real time techniques to watch what has happened when people read a story.
28 subjects took in tails from the day end life a 7  year old boy who does things like  get out of bed and sit through English lesson. Sure enough, when raymen to his desk sales in the readers brains that govern scoring also spring to life. Fortunately, the copy cannoning we don’t actually add doubt to the things we read about. If we did, you won’t want to see next someone skimming the daily paper.  
Thanks for the minute, for scientific Americans’ sixty second science. I’m Karen Hopkin.
作者: lightsunshine    时间: 2009-8-16 10:42

This is scientific Americans, 60 second science. This will just take a minute.
Remember Dicken Jane and her dog’s bark? Maybe you read about them in the first grade, “say spot run, run, spot run!”  Well, a new study in the journal psychologist science suggested that not only did you see spot run, but you run too. At lest I your mind, because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing. For years, scientist suspected that our brain simulates the activity we read about. In behaviors study, people who are reading about the score in a soccer goal, we act more quickly when ask to make a kicking motion than when told to see pat our heads. Now researchers have used real time brain region techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tails from day and night of Ramen, a 7-year old boy who does things like get out of the bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough when Ramen scurry to his school desk, cells in reader’s brains that govern scurrying also spring to the life. Fortunately, the copycatting is confined to the brain, we don’t actually doubt the thing we read about. If you did, you would not want someone next skimming the paper.
作者: lightsunshine    时间: 2009-8-16 10:46

15# 有钱小女巫


well done
作者: hivince    时间: 2009-8-22 01:19

Homework
This is Scientific American 60 seconds Science. I am KarenHopkin, this will just take a minute.


Remember ......... Maybe you read aboutin first grade. See spot run, run spot run, well, a new study in JournalPsychological Science suggests not only did you see spot run, but you ran too,at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brainregions that control doing that thing.



For years, scientists suspected our brain simulate theactivities we read about. In behavioral studies, people who are reading about scoringa soccer goal react more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than wetold to. Now researchers use real time brain imaging techniques to watch whathappens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tails from a day in thelife of Raymond, a seven years old boy who does things like get out of bed and sitthrough an English lesson. Sure enough, when Raymond scurries to his school desk,cells in the readers’ brains that govern scurrying also spring to life.Fortunately, the copycatting is confined to the brain we don’t actually act outthe things we read about. If we did, you wouldn’t want to sit next to someonewho is skimming the daily paper.
作者: 听听abc1    时间: 2009-9-18 15:12

问一下你们平时都怎么练习听写啊,视听一句写一句吗
作者: shube    时间: 2010-1-15 10:37

Homework
This is scientific Americans 60-seconds science. I am Karen Hopgen. This will just take a minute.
Remember Dakejin and dogs? Maybe you read about them in first grade. See spot run. Run. Spot. Run. Well, a new study in the journal psychological science suggest not only did you see spot run, but you run too, at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing. For years, scientists have suspected that our brains simulate the activities we read about. In behavioral studies, people who were reading about scoring a soccer goal. We had a more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than when told to, say, pat their heads.
Now researchers use real-time brain-imagining techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tales from a day in the life of Raymond, a 7-year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough, when Raymond scurries to his school desk, cells in the readers' brain that govern scurrying, also spring to life.
Fortunately, the copycatting is confined to the brain. We do not actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you would not want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.
作者: 辰舞樱    时间: 2010-7-14 11:22

本帖最后由 辰舞樱 于 2010-7-14 11:23 编辑

HW

Remember Dick Jane and their dog spot.Maybe you read about them in first grade.See spot run,run, spot run.Well,a new study in the journal phychological science suggests that not only you did see spot run,but you run too.At least in your mind,because reading about something turns on the same brain regions means control doing that thing.
For years,scientists have suspected that our brains simulate activities we read about it.In behavioral studies,people who are reading about scoring goal react more qucily when asked to make a kicking motion than when told to,say:pet their  heads.Now research have used real time brain imaging to techniques to watch what happens when people read a story.Twelty-eight sbjects took in tales from a day in the life of Raymond,a seven-year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an english lesson.Sure enough, when Reymond scurries to his school desk,cells in the readers' brains that govern scurrying also spring to life.
Fortunately,the copycatting is confired to the brain,we don't actally act out the things we read about,if we do,you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.

作者: 锋玉无阻    时间: 2010-9-28 18:14

呜呜呜,为什么我听不懂。。。。。。。。。。。。。。。
作者: jerry19951021    时间: 2011-2-13 20:16

Homework
This is SA,SSS. I'm Karin Hopkin.This will take just a minute.
Remember Dick and Jane ,and their dog spots?Maybe you read about them first grade. See spot run,dog spot run.Well,a new study in the journal Psychological science suggested that not only your see spot run,but you run too.At least in your mind. Because reading of sth. turns on the same brain regions control doing that thing.For years, scientists have suspected that our brain simulate the activities were read about. In behavior studies, people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal react more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than when told to, say, pat their heads.Now researchers use real time brain imaging techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tales from a day in life of Raymonds, a 7-year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough, when Raymonds scurries to his school desk, cells in the reader’s brain that govern scurrying also spring to life. Fortunately, the copycatting is confined to the brain,we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.
Thanks for the minute for SA,SSS. I'm
Karin Hopkin.
作者: warmkitty    时间: 2011-2-13 21:36

This is Science American's 60-Second Science. I'm KH. This will just take a minute.
Remember D and J and their dog Spot? Maybe you read about them in first grade. see Spot run, run spot run. Well i a study in the journal Phychological Sciencesuggests that now only your see spot run but you ran too,at least in your mind. Becasue read about something turns on the same brain ranges that control doing that thing. For years, scientists are suspected our brains simulated that activities we read about. In behaviors study people who are scoring a soccer goal react more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion that we told to.Now researchers use  real type brain-imaging technique to watch  what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in talefrom a day in life of Roymand. A 7 years old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lession. Sure enough when Raymond scurries to his school desk, cells in the reader's brain that goverscurryingalso spring to life.
Fourtunately, the copycatting is confined to the brain. we do not actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you would not want to sit nexct to someone skimming the dailypaper.
作者: amynanu    时间: 2011-2-22 10:59

我是新人哈·想请问下你们通常听几遍就能听写出来啊?
作者: fwforest    时间: 2011-3-28 18:54

HW
This is Scientific American's 60-Second Science. I'm Karen Hopkin. This will just take a minute.

Remember DK in the doctor's sport, maybe write about the first grade. See sports run, run sports run. A new study in the Psychological Science suggest that not only did you see the sports run, but you run too resting your mind because reading about something turn on the same brain region control doing that thing. For year, scientists suscepted our brain simulate activity we read about. In behavior studies, people who are reading about a goal, we are quickly making about kicking motion when we total say has. Now research is using real time brain imaging technology to watch what will happen when people read a story. 20 subjects took their time all day in the rommie, a 7-year old boy who doesn't get to bed English lesson. Sure enough, when rommie risk to school desk, several in the reader's brain that govern the screen also sprain to life. Fortunately, it can be that confine the brain. We don't actually act out things we read about. If we did, you would not want to see the next someone paper.

Thanks for the minute. For the Scientific American's 60-Second Science. I'm Karen Hopkin.
作者: RAINBOWXIAOMEI    时间: 2011-4-22 18:49

1# qingchengshan
homework

this is scientific americans 60 seconds science, i'm  . just take a minute. remember dickens drin in their dog's box maybe you read about them in your first grade. but tun run but run a new study in the journal psychololgical science suggests that not only sees but run but you run, too, at least your mind. bucause reading about something turn on the same region brain that control doing that thihg. for years scientists suspect that bring similated the same thing we read about in behaviors or studys people who read or study in a soccer goal we act more quickly when we are in a kicting motion than pat their heads. now researcher use real time bring imiaging techniks to watch what happens when people read a story 28 subjects took in tales from a day and life agreement things a 7 year old boy who does things like get off bed and sit through an english lesson. sure enough when women get up a school desk, of the readers brains also spring to life. fortunately, the car confine to the brain, we actually ever doubt about the things we read about. if we did, you would't see someone skimming the daily paper. thanks for the minute, for
作者: 热火向前进    时间: 2011-9-26 19:32

强人HW:






This is Science American's 60-Second Science. I'm Karen Hopkin. This will just take a minute.






Remember Dick and Jane? And their dog Spot? Maybe you read about them in first grade. See Spot run, run, Spot, run! Well, a new study in the journal Psychological Science suggested that not only did you see Spot run, but you ran, too,at least in your mind. Because reading about something turns on the same brain regions that control doing that thing.






For years, scientists have suspected that our brain simulate the activities we read about. In behavior studies, people who are reading about scoring a soccer goal react more quickly when asked to make a kicking motion than when told to, say, pat their heads.






Now researchers use real-time brain-imaging techniques to watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tales from a day in life of Raymond, a 7-year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through an English lesson. Sure enough, when Raymond scurries to his school desk, cells in the reader’s brain that govern scurrying also spring to life.






Fortunately, the copycatting盲目模仿 is confined to the brain--we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you wouldn't want to sit next to someone skimming the daily paper.





Thanks for the minute for Science American's 60-Second Science. I'm
Karen Hopkin.
作者: doudou900914    时间: 2012-2-1 15:03

HW
Rember Dick and Jane? And there dog Spot. Maybe you read about them in first grad. See Spot run. Run spot, run! Well, a new study in the journal psycological science sugested not only did you see Spot run, but you run, too, and listen your mind, because reading about something turns on the same brain ranges that control doing that thing. For year, scientist suspected that our brain simulate the activity we read about. In behavior you studied people who were reading about scoring a soccer goal react more quickly what as make a kicking motion than we told to say patter heads. Now, researchers use real time bring-imaging technique to watch what happens when people read a story. 28 subjects took in tales from a day and life of Reymond,a seven-year-old boy who does things like get out of bed and sit through English lesson. Sure enough, when Reymond scurries to his school desk, seles in the readers brains that govern scrurries also spring to life. Fortunnately, the copycanting is confined the brain we don't actually act out the things we read about. If we did, you won't want to see next someone skimming the daily paper.




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