Board logo

标题: [英伦广角] 【整理】2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行 [打印本页]

作者: hlr    时间: 2010-4-21 09:12     标题: 2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

本帖最后由 qingchengshan 于 2010-4-21 09:14 编辑

user posted image
All UK Airports Re-Open Following Tests


All UK airports have re-opened after test flights proved planes can withstand volcanic ash. Experts reassessed the risk from the ash cloud and have now raised the tolerance levels that aircraft have in low ash density areas. Sky's Ian Dovaston reports.

[flv]http://download.putclub.com/newupdate/multitopic/British_Vision/putclub.com_2010bv015UK-reopen.flv[/flv]
user posted image


【电信1】 RealVideo / mp3

【电信2】 RealVideo / mp3

【网通/教育网】 RealVideo / mp3

点击进入英伦广角整理稿汇总页面

点击进入多主题版块听写规则(新手必读)


版主提示:
一、若是自己的听写稿, 请发帖时标注'Homework'.
二、若是改稿, 请发帖时标注'on 某某人'并在修改处标红.
三、为了达到最快的下载速度,推荐使用迅雷高速下载本站音频/视频材料.


作者: ifrun    时间: 2010-4-21 10:39

HW

After 6 long and unpresent days britain airport have opened.the remain no fly ash cloud will identified on the daily space.and body the regulate lines has put on special rules.

DAA survive airspace guider requires airlines :first to conduct the own risk sesstment and delivery operation pressdure to address any remaining risks. secondly put in place and intensive ash damage respection before and after each flight. thirdly report any ash related incidents to // round by CAA. british airways which called a flight a necessary after test two days with willing on aborad has been losing 20 million pounds a day and has been delayed by his new development.

i don't believe it is necessary to hold a blanc //in all uk last Thursday. my personal believe // for appear time. i think the // the decision   put has been justify. but i said you know that is the personal view. we will settle down into cause we share the days we have and we will share the learning  we have from this experiment. and I am sure that this // would be other soon forward a different future to me.

the expert says with    no been flow into the wind that consident moniture of ash cloud potential for danger will continue.there will still be no flys owns and the civigation // on the basic of the current present of ash cloud these //  would not effect any uk airports.but day by day annoucement will made in respect of this no freezes. it was a day britsh was support to fly again, better later than ever. only a lucky few like those flight from Erdingbough to stock away manage to get into the air.

this flight be able to //  it is only 40 miles from//  .i think we could suvive. these students fly backing // to from iceland. and geograpy feel to turn out in the shoulder of erupting volcano . we are backing one place. // just now for london say.we are not hurry up. it is will  fly 10 kilometer from volcano in potland and you know all the way back to england, people all even know across the // thanks a lot for this matter.

at these the package industries would like to acting more quickly. we would like government // to around the table a little bit quickly and certain to say that , but the moment we are happy the things change so far so good, we know the process //europe's busiest airports thethow as well as one of the  backing to business tonight but safety dealing six fly days present the next challenge.
作者: danana    时间: 2010-4-21 10:52

Homework

After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flight paths along lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regualtes airlines has put in place special routes.

-The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessments and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA.

British Airways, which called the flight ban a necessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

-I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could've safely continued operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and would share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others who would put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

-There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would affect any UK airports. But day by day, annoucements will be made in respects of those no-fly zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.

-But we're nervous flying anyay. But it's only 45 minutes from herer to Stornoway. I think I should survive.  ????

These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.

-We're back on peace. We're now going ???? for London. So we're not home yet. But we're knowing.  ????

-Yes we'll flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in poor planes. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know it's get from across France and thinks of that as mad.  ????

It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would have liked to action more quickly.

-We would have liked governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed. So far so good. We know we're getting the process to fly people home.

Europe's busiest airport Hethrew as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built throught 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.
作者: nomatterwhat    时间: 2010-4-21 10:55

Homework:

After six long and unprecedented days, Britain’s airports have reopened. The remain no-fly zones but safe flight pats around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis and the body that regulator airlines has put in place special rules. The CAA’s revised air space guidance requires airlines: first to conduct their own risk assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by CAA.

British Airways which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test two days ago with Willie Wash on board has been losing 20 million pounds a day and he is delighted by this new development. I don’t believe it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK space last Thursday. My personal belief is that we could have safety continued operation for a period of time. I think the well locations when the decision to close air space could have been justified. But as I said you know that’s a personal view. We will sit down into courts. We will share the data we have and we will share the learnings that we had over this period. And I’m sure it will be soon we put forward a different view to make.

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind that constantly monitoring the ash cloud in its potential for danger will continue. There will still be no-flight zones. The * office and the Civil Aviation authority advise me on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-flight zones will not affect any UK airports but day by day announcements will be made and inspect those no-flight zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to * manage to get into the air. I will nervous flying anytime, but it’s only 45 minutes flight from *. So I think I should survive. These students flew back into Edinburgh from Iceland and a geographic field trip turned out in the shadow of erupting volcano. We are back in peace. We are now going * to just local London, so we are not home yet but we know we will. It’s flying ten kilometers from the volcano and * and yet you know all the way back England people even aren’t known we escape from air *.

It’s clear that those in the package holiday industry would love to action more quickly. We would fly * around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly we certainly say that the moment we are happy the things have changed. So far so good. We know we are getting progress in flying people home. Europe’s busiest airport Heathrow as well as those right across UK are back in business tonight but safely dealing with the back clock built through six flightless days presents the next challenge.
作者: 保十洁有时开心    时间: 2010-4-21 11:29

本帖最后由 保十洁有时开心 于 2010-4-21 11:30 编辑

onnomatterwhat
After six long and unprecedented days, Britain’s airports have reopened. The remain no-fly zones but safe flight pats around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis and the body that regulator airlines has put in place special rules.
“The CAA’s revised air space guidance requires airlines: first to conduct their own risk assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by CAA.”

British Airways which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test two days ago with Willie Wash on board has been losing 20 million pounds a day and he is delighted by this new development.
“ I don’t believe it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK air space last Thursday. My personal belief is that we could have safety continued operation for a period of time. I think the weird occations when the decision to close air space could have been justified. But as I said you know that’s a personal view. We will sit down into courts. We will share the data we have and we will share the learnings that we had over this period. And I’m sure it will be soon we put forward a different view to make.”

Meanwhile, the transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind that constantly monitoring the ash cloud in its potential for danger will continue.
“There will still be no-flight zones. The * office and the Civil Aviation authority advise me on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-flight zones will not affect any UK airports but day by day announcements will be made and in respect of those no-flight zones. ”

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to * manage to get into the air.
“I will nervous flying anytime, but it’s only 45 minutes flight from *. So I think I should survive. ”
These students flew back into Edinburgh from Iceland and a geographic field trip has turned out in the shadow of erupting volcano.
“We are back in peace. We are now going * down south to just local London, so we are not home yet but we are on our way. ”
“It’s flying ten kilometers from the volcano and * and yet you know all the way back England people even aren’t known we escape from France things a lot it's mess. ”

It’s clear that those in the package holiday industry would love to action more quickly. “We would fly to governments around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly we certainly say that,but at the moment we are happy the things have changed. So far so good. We know we are getting process in flying people home.”
Europe’s busiest airport Heathrow as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight but safely dealing with the back clock built through six flightless days presents the next challenge.
作者: 郭晨昱    时间: 2010-4-21 11:35

On danana
After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flight paths around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regualtes airlines has put in place special routes.

-The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessments and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to a reporting scheme run by the CAA.

British Airways, which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

-I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could've safely continued operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and would share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others who would put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, the constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

-There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would not affect any UK airports. But day by day, annoucements will be made in respects of those no-fly zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.

-But we're nervous flying anyay. But it's only 45 minutes from here to Stornoway. I think I should survive.  


These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.

-We're back on peace. We're now going * to just local London soon . So we're not home yet,but we konw we'll.
-It's flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in poor planes. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know we escape from across France and thinks of that as mad.  
It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would have liked to action more quickly.

-We would have liked governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed. So far so good. We know we're getting the process to fly people home.

Europe's busiest airport Heathrow as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built throught 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.

作者: ellen88924    时间: 2010-4-21 13:38

on郭晨昱
After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flight paths around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regulates airlines has put in place special rules.

The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessments and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to
/ reporting scheme run by the CAA.

British Airways, which called the flight ban
unnecessary
after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could
have safety continued operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and somebody
share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others who would put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind,
that
constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would
not
affect any UK airports. But day by day, announcements will be made in respects of those no-fly zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to
Sternway
managed to get into the air.

-But we're nervous flying anyway. But it's only 45 minutes
late from here to Sternway. I think I should survive.  

These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.

-We're back on peace. We're now going
10 hour cage shut down cell to just local London, So we're not home yet, but we are on the way.
-It's flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in poor planes. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know we escape from across France and thinks of that as mad.  
It's clear that those in the package holiday industry
would like
action more quickly.

-We would
like
governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed. So far so good. We know we're getting the process to fly people home.

Europe's busiest airport
Heathrow
as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.

作者: 蜜仔    时间: 2010-4-21 13:48     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

After six long and unprecedented days, Britain’s Airports have reopened.  The remain no flies on specific path surround ash cloud will be identified on the daily basis and the bodied regulate airlines has put in place special rules.
CAA revised Airspace skidens requires at airlines revise first to conduct their own risk assessment and development operational procedures to address any remaining risks.  Secondly, putting place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight.  And thirdly, report any ash related incidents to reporting's team run by CAA.
British Airways which call the flight ban unnecessary after staging it's own test two days ago with woolly wash on board.  This been losing 20 million pounds a day, and this delighted by this new development.
I don't believe it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday.  My personal belief is that because of the safety continued operation for a period of time, I think the world allocation is put up been justify.  But as I said, you know, that's a personal view.  We will sit down into course and share the data we have.  And we will share the learning studs? that we have had over this period.  And I'm sure they would be others' report forward if different feel to me.
Meanwhile, the transport secretary with kingtis stress that cause has not been thrown into the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash clouds is potential for danger will continue.
There will still be no flights on.  The matter office and the survey authorisation advise me, on the basis of the current presents of the ash cloud, those no flight zones will not effect any UK airports, but day by day announcement will be made in respects of no flight zones.
It was the day breaking the news supposed to fly again better late than never.  Only a lucky fuel like those aboard this fight from Edinburg to Storenerway manage to get into the air.
But we know this flight, but it's 20 or 45 minutes late from ??.  I think they are still survive.  This student is flown from Barking to Emberer from Iceland, and the geography failed to procedure turned out in the shuttle of the erupting of the volcano.
We are backing won peace when our going 10 hours shut it down self to, just know for London, so we are not ?hemiyat? for our own way.  
Coz we are flying ten kilometers from the volcano, and call planes and yet, you know, all the way backing to England people even what's get that across the France, things like that.
It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would've like action more quickly.
We would like the government around here could go around the tale a little bit more quickly.  We could certainly say that, the moment we are happy to see the change, so far so good.  We now begin closes the flight people ??.
European busiest airport Heathrow, as well as those right across Britain a backing business tonight but safely dealing with ?backlog? built through six flightless days presents the next challenge.

This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: daisyundersun    时间: 2010-4-21 15:30

HW

After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flights path around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regulates airlines has put in place special rules.

“The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to a reporting scheme run by the CAA.”

British Airways, which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

“I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could safely continue operation for a period of time. I think there were occasional plans when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and would share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be those who would put forward a different view to me.”

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, the constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

“There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would not affect any UK airports. But day by day, annoucements will be made in respect of those no-fly zones.”

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.

“But we're nervous flying anyway. But it's only 45 minutes from here to Stornoway. I think I should survive.”

These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.

“We're back on peace. We're now going 10-hour cold journey down South to just north of London. So we're not home yet, but we know we'll.”

“It's flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in COD planes. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know we escaped from across France and thinks of that as mad.  

It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would have liked to action more quickly.”

“We would have liked governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed. So far so good. We know we're getting the process to fly people home.”

Europe's busiest airport Heathrow as well as that right across the UK are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.
作者: eric_young    时间: 2010-4-21 16:26     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

Homework

After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have re-opened.There remain no fly zones,but safe fly paths around England ash cloud will be identifed on a daily basis ,and the body the regulates airlines has put in place special rules.

The CAA revised Airspace Guidance requires an airlines first to conduct their own risk assessment and developed operational procedures to address any remaining risks.Secondly,putting planes in an intensive maitanence ash damage inspection before and after each flight.And thirdly,report any ash-related incidence to reporting scheme run by the CAA.

British Airways ,which called the flight ban a necessary after staging a test two days ago with Willie Walsh onboard has been losing 20 million pounds a day,and is delighted by this new development.

I don't believe that it's necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday.I personally believe this that could've safely continued operation for a period of time.I think there were occasions when the decision to close our airspace could've been justified,but just as said ,you know it's a personal view.We'll sit down in due course,we'll share the data we have and we will share the learning stuff ,say ,we have had ,during this period.And i'm sure there'll be others who will put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile,the Transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind.The constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

There will still be no fly zones.The MET office and the Civilation Aviation authority advised me on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud.Those no fly zones will no affect any UK aiports ,but day by day,annoucement will be made in respects of those no fly zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again, better late than never,only a luck few like those aboard flights from Edinburgh to Stoneway managed to get into the air.

But I'm nervous to fly around XXX,it's only 45 minutes late from here to Stoneway  XXXX, I think I should survive.

Each students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography feel trip has been turned out in the shadow of the erupting volcano.

We're back om peace,we're not going  XXX so ,just to XXLondon,we're not home yet,but we know where we at.

This will flying ten kilometers from the volcano in poor planes,and you know, all the way back to the England,people aren't even know it heads XXX across the France and they think that as mad.

It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would've liked action more quickly.

We would've liked the governments around Euro to go around the table a little bit more quickly ,we would certainly say that .But at the moment,we 're happy that things have changed,so far so good,we now begin the process to fly people homw.

Europe busiset airport Heathrow as well as those right across the UK are back in buisness tonight.But safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.

This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: 霞半仙    时间: 2010-4-21 21:25     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

after 6 lone and own president the dage, britain's airports have re-opened. there remain no flight and be take parts around the lingering ash cloud will be identified on the daily basis, and the body the regulate airlines has putting place special routes. CAA has revised S*S-base guidance requires at airlines. first, to conduct the own risk assessment and to develop operational precedures to address any remaining risks; secondly, put in place and intensive immensing ash damage inspection before and after each flight; and thirdly, report any ash related insidents to reporting scheme ran by CAA. berty shareways, which called the flight band, unecessary after staging a stone test two days ago with willy wash on board, has loosing 20m pounds a day and this delighted by this new development. i don't believe they will necessary to host blank band and augue cares base last thursday. eh, my personal belief this thar could safe continue docuration for a period of time. i think the world acations when the just put a thing justify, but just as i said, you know, that's a personal view. we will set down into course somebody share their data that we have, and we'll like share the learning staff that we have of this period, and i'm sure there would be so a different future man. the transport tectry with kington stressed the caution is not been frown to the wind. the constant monitrain of the ash cloud in the potencial for danger will continue. there will still be no-fine zones. the metaphors and the civiligational folity avised me on the basis of the college presents of the ash cloud, there's no fine zones will notifect any uk airports. and day by day anouncements would be made in respect of the no fine zones. the day britain with post to fly again better late than never. only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from aidenberg to stonoway manage to get into the air. but any of you knew the flight, it's only 45 minute i think should survive. these students flown to bakin and to enblem former iceland and the geography feel triper then turned out in the shadow of the inroptin volcano. once peace now going turn out to london so we ...from this volcano in proper lanes, and you know, all the bagaining england people get from is mad. it's clear that those in package holiday industry would have like the action more quickly. it would like government around the table a little bit more quickly with service at that, but at the moment happy the things changed so fast so good we now promited people have. euro spirits said this airport here throw as while as those right across the uk unbarked business flight days present this challenge.
This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: hangbaiju    时间: 2010-4-21 22:39     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

After 6 long and unpleasant days, Britain's airports have re-opened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe fly paths surround lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And body the regulator airlines has put in place special rules.

The CAA's revised s-by space guidance requires (an) airlines: first, to conduct there own risk assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly, report any ash related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA.   

British Airways, which called the fly ban unnecessary after a stage its own test fly two days ago with Willy Wash on borad, has been loosen 20 billion pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

I don't believe it was necessary to impose a blank and ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. Uh... my personal believe is that we could safely continue the operation for a period of time. I think there are various occasions when the decision to close our space could have been justified, but as I said, you know, that’s personal view. We will sit down in due course sombody share the data that we have, and we assure the learning that we have had over this period, and I am sure there would be others soon put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile, the Transport Secretary was keen to stress that caution is not been thrown to the wind, that constant monitory of ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.
There will still be no-fly zones. The MET Office and the civil aviation authority advise me that on the basis of the current presents of the ash cloud, there'll on-fly zones would not affect any UK airports, but day by day announcement will be made in respects of those no-fly zone.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again, better later than never. Only a lucky few like those boards this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air. “But we are nervous flying anyway, but, it's only 45 minutes fly from here to Stornoway. I think I should survive.

These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland, and geography feel trip turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.  We are back in peace. we now go Tanadicase ???down just for London. We don’t, I mean out of no way. That's we'll flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in poor planes. And yet, you know all the way back England people want to even know gets across France, think of that sort of matter.
It is clear that those in the package holiday industry would've like action more quickly. We would like the governments around Europe to go around the table a little bit more quickly, we could certainly say that, but at the moment we are happy that the things have changed, so far so good. We now begin the process of flying people home.

Europe's busiest airport Heathrow as well as those right across are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.





This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: sukiYL    时间: 2010-4-21 22:51

After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have re-opened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flight paths surround lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis, and the body that regulate airlines has put in place special rules.
The CAA's revised airspace guidance, require airlines first to conduct their own risk assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight, and thirdly report any ash-related incidence to reporting scheme run by CAA.

British Airways, which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test 2 days ago, with Willy Walsh on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day, and is delighted by this new development.

I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief's that we could have safely continued operation for a period of time. I think there were locations when the decision to close our airspace could have been justified, but as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We will sit down in due course, we'll share the data that we have, and we'll share the learning set we have had over this period, and I'm sure there will be others who will put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not been thrown to the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

There will still be no-fly zones. The MAT office and the civil Aviation authority advise me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones will not affect any UK airports, but day-by-day announcement will be made in respect of those no-fly zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again, better late than never. Only a lucky few, like those aboard this month from Edinburgh to Stoner-away, managed to get into the air.  

Bit of a nervous flight anyway, but it's only 45 minutes flight from Stone-away, so I think I should survive.

These student have flew back into Edinburgh from Iceland and the geography field trip, as it turned out in the shadow of interrupting volcano.

We are back in one piece. We are now going 10 hour coach journey down south, to just north London. So, we are not home yet, but we are on our way.  

Cause we were flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in proper lengths. Yeah, you know, all the way back in England, people aren't even know what's like across the France. It's mad.

It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would've liked action more quickly.

We would have liked the government surround Europe to go around the table a little bit more quickly. We can certainly say that, but at the moment we are happy that things have changed. So far so good. We are now beginning the process of flying people home.

Europe's busiest airport Heathrow, as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight, but safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.

作者: montak    时间: 2010-4-21 23:52

homework
After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flight paths around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regualtes airlines has put in place special rules.

-The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA.

British Airways, which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

-I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could've safely continued operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and would share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others who would put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

-There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would affect any UK airports. But day by day, annoucements will be made in respects of those no-fly zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again.Better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.

-But we're nervous flying anyay. But it's only 45 minutes from herer to Stornoway. I think I should survive.  

These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.

-We're back on peace. We're now going ten hour couch journey down south, to just north London. So we're not home yet. But we're on our way.

-Yes we'll flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in proper lanes. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know what's it like across France or things of that. It's mad.  

It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would have liked  action more quickly.

-We would have liked governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed. So far so good. We know we're getting the process to fly people home.

Europe's busiest airport Hethrow as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built throught 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.
作者: vivian900    时间: 2010-4-22 00:03     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

After six long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no fly zones but safe fly paths surround lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis.And the body the regular airlines have put in place special rules.CAA has revised S by S base guidance requires our airline first to conduct the own risk assessment of opeational procedures to address any remaining risk. secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight and thirdly,report any ash related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA. British airways which called flght ban unnecessary after its staging a term test two days ago. with XX on board has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development. I don't believe it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on whole UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief is that we've a safety continue operation for a period of time. I think there were occations when the decision to close our airspace  could have been justified, just as i said that's a personal view.we'll sit down in due course and share the data we have and we'll share the learning steps that we had over this period. i'm sure there would be others who sort of put forward a different a view to me.
Meanwhile the transport secretory was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown into the wind.  Constant monitoring of the ash cloud and the potential to danger will continue. There will still be no fly zones the met office and the civil aviation authority advised me on the basis of the current presence ash clouds those fly zone won't affect any UK airports. Day by day, announcements will be made in respects of those no fly zones. It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again. Better late than never. only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from edibourge to stoneaway managed to get into the air.
We are a bit nevous anyway,but it's only 45 mins. I think i should survive.This students flew back into XX from XX. and the geography field trip had turned out in the shadow of the erupting volcano. We are back in peace. when we'r going ten hour cold journey down south just north london so we'r not home yet, we'r on our way. It's flying 10 kilo meters from the volcano and properlands. and yet you know all the way back england people i even know get to know i crossed france think that's mad. It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would like action more quickly. It would like governments around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly We are certain to say that. But at the moment we'r happy to things have changed so far so good. We now begin the process of flying people home. Europe's busiest airport XX as one of those right across the UK are back in business tonit but safely dealing with back log built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge

This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: zenojackzhou    时间: 2010-4-22 00:07     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

After 6 long and unprecedented days, British airports have reopened. the remaining low flight zone but safely flying passing around the lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis and boarded the regulator lines have been put into place special routes. the CAA's revised S by S base guidance requires that the airlines first to conduct their own rish assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks; secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. and thirdly, report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA. British airway, which is called flight bank unnecessisarily staging its own test two days ago with Willey Wash on board has been losing 20 million pounds a day and he's delighted by this new development. i don't believe it was necessary to impose the blank ban on all UK airs based on last Thursday. my personal belief is that we could safely continue the operation for a period of time. i think the well locations when the decisions to close the airports could have been justified, but i said, you know, that's my personal view. and we will sit down and into the course well share the data we have. we'll share the learning stuffs we have had over these period. and i'm sure that we could put forward different future means. meanwhile,the transport secretary was keen on stressing the cautions not been thrown into the wind.The constantly monitoring the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue. There will still be low flight zones.the metaoffice and the civil navigation authorities advised me that on the basis of the current presence of ash cloud those low flight zones will not affect any UK airports. but day by day. announcement will be made over inspecting all those low flight zones. it was the day Britain was supposed to fly again.better late than never. only a lucky few like those who boarded this flight from Edinburge to Dallaway managed to get into the air.but we know this flight would 24 or five minutes through storm i think we should survie.these students flow back into Edinburge from Iceland, and the geographic field trip turned out in the shadow of erupting volcano. we are back on peace, we now go to  down south to just London, so as you know it's been flying 10 kilometres from the volcano in proper length, and yuhh,you know, all the way back England people  even know it's getting across the France.things are like that, you know, it's mad. it was clear that those in the package holiday industry would have like the action more quickly. we would like the government around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. we can certainly see that. but the moment when all those happy things have changed so far so good. we know it will begin the process of flying people  home. European' busiest airport Healthrow ,as well as those right across UN are back into service tonight,but safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.

This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: amy4u    时间: 2010-4-22 01:20

HW
After 6 long and unprecedented days Britain’s airports have reopened. The remaining no-fly zones but safe plates around England ash cloud will be identified on the data basis.
Special rules:
Require airlines to ----1st : airlines to conduct own risk assessment &develop operation procedure to address remaining risks .Secondly: put in place an intensive maintenances ash damage inspection before and after each flight.3rd,report any ash related incidence to reporting scheme run by the CAA.
British airways which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with William Wash on board has losing cost 20million pounds and this delighted by these new development
“I don’t believe it was necessary to impose the blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. Er.. my personal belief is that we could safety continue decollation for a period of time. I think the weird occasions when the decision to close air space have been justified. But as I said that’s personal view. We were settling down into a court and share the data we have. We share the learning stars that we have had over this period and I am sure there would be another suitable put forward it. It was different view to me.
Meanwhile a transport secretary was came to stress that caution is not be thrown to the wind that continually monitoring of the Ash cloud ..its potential for danger will continue .They will still be no fly zones. The matter of space and ** advise me that on basis of the current presence of ash cloud .those no-fly zones would not affect any UK airports ,but day by day announcements would be made in spite of those no-fly zones. It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again.
Better later than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from * to * manage to get into the air. “But it’s only 45 minutes fight. I think I should survive “
These students are back
In the shutter ….
You know all the way back to England across France… It’s mad.
It’s clearly those packaged holiday industry would like the action more quickly
We would like the government to go around the table and look back quickly we would certainly say that. But the moment We are happy to see things changed so far so good. We now began the process in flying people home.
….
As well as…Backlog 6 days flightless presents next challenge
作者: enjola    时间: 2010-4-22 09:52

After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flight paths around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regualtes airlines has put in place special rules.
The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA.
British Airways, which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.
I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could've safely continued operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and would share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others who would put forward a different view to me.
Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.
There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would affect any UK airports. But day by day, annoucements will be made in respects of those no-fly zones.
It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again.Better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.
But we're nervous flying anyay. But it's only 45 minutes from herer to Stornoway. I think I should survive.  
These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.
We're back on peace. We're now going ten hour couch journey down south, to just north London. So we're not home yet. But we're on our way.
Yes we'll flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in proper lanes. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know what's it like across France or things of that. It's mad.  
It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would have liked  action more quickly.
We would have liked governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed. So far so good. We know we're getting the process to fly people home.
Europe's busiest airport Hethrow as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built throught 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.

作者: jhxxjunjun    时间: 2010-4-22 10:03

After 6 long and unprecedent days, Britain's airports have re-opened. There remain ..., but safe flight paths along lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regualtes airlines has put in place special routes.

-The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessments and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA.

British Airways, which called the flight ban a necessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

-I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could've safely continued operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and would share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others who would put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

-There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would affect any UK airports. But day by day, annoucements will be made in respects of those no-fly zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.

-?????????
作者: huangyan0627    时间: 2010-4-22 17:27     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

HW
After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no fly zones, but safe flight paths around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body the regulate airlines have put in place special routes.
The CAA revised Airspace Guidance requires an airlines first to conduct their own risk assessment, and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, putting planes in an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly, report any ash related incidents to reporting the scheme run by the CAA.
British airways, which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test two days ago. With Willie Walsh onboard, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.
I don't think it is necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we can safely continued the operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when decision to close their airspace could be justified. But that is personal view, we will sit down in due course and would share the data we have had over this period. I am sure there will be others who would put forward a different view to me.
Meanwhile the transport secretary is keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind. The constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.
There will still be no fly zones, the Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of current presence of the ash cloud, those no fly zones would not affect any UK airports. Day by day, the announcement will be made in respect of all the no fly zones.
It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again, better late than never, only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Sternway managed to get into the air.
But we’re nervous flying anyway. It is only 45 minutes way from here to Sternway. i think i will survive. These students have flown back into Edinburgh from iceland. And their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.
We’re back on peace. We’re now going  North London, so we are not home yet, but we are on the way.
It is flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in poor planes. All the ways back to England, people won’t even know we escape from across France and thinks of that as mad.
It is clear that those in the package holiday industry would like action more quickly. We would like governments around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We can certainly say that, but at the moment we are happy that the things are changed. So far so good, we know we’re getting the process to fly the people home.
Europe's busiest airport Heathrow as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight, but safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.


This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: terryandlucy    时间: 2010-4-22 21:23     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remaining no-fly zones, but safe flight path along lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the board that regualtes airlines has put in place special routes.

The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessments and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly, report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA.

British Airways, which called the flight ban a necessary after staging its own test 2 days ago, with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a flight ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could have safely continued operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and would share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others who would put forward a different view to me.

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

There will still be no-fly zones.The Meteo Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would not affect any UK airports. But day by day, annoucements will be made in respects of those no-fly zones.

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again, better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.But we're nervous flying anyay. But it's only 45 minutes from here to Stornoway. I think I should survive.

These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip was turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.
We're back on more peace. We're now going **say you are just know  London so we don't Avia or where no way.
Yes, we'll flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in poor planes. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know it's get from across France and thinks of that as mad.
It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would like action more quickly.We would like governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed. So far so good. We know we're getting the process to fly people home.

Europe's busiest airport Heathrow as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.

This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: Carol潇    时间: 2010-4-25 22:19     标题: [Homework]2010-04-21 英飞机场重新运行

Homework:
After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's Airports have reopened.There remain no-fly zones but safe fly path surround lingering ash clouds will be identified on a daily basis and the body of regulate airlines has put in place special rules.
The CAA's revise ___ by airspace guidance requires a airline: first, to conduct their own risk accessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks.Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight and thirdly, report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA.
British Airport which called the flight ban a necessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with willing wash on board has been losing two million pounds a day and it is delighted by this new development.
I dont believe it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all of UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belife is that we could safely continue the operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decisions to close airspace could have been justified. But as i said,you know, that personal view, we will sit down in due course and would share the date that we have. And we will share the learning stuff that we have had over this period and im sure it will _____a different view to me.
Meanwhile, a transport secretery was keen to stress that the caution is not being thrown to the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.
There will still be no flight zones. The Met office and the civilization authority advise me on the basis of the current presence of the ash clouds, those no-fly zones will not affact any UK airports.But day by day, announcements will be made in respect of those night no-fly zones.
It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again. Better late than never. Only a lucky few like ___ from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.
But we are nerves to fly anyway but ah, its only 45 mins flight from____ , I think i should survive.
These students have flown back into Edinburgh from iceland and the geogragh filed trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.
We are back on peace when i was going, turn out______ to just north of london so we are not home yet. We are on our way.
Cuz we all were flying 10 kilometers from volcano in poor planes,you know,all the way back in England, people are not even known if its get across the France and things like that, its mad.
Its clear that those in the package holiday industry would have liked the action more quickly.
We would like the governments around the Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly and they certainly say that. But at the moment, we are happy that things have changed, so far so good. We know we are getting the process of fly ppl home.
Europe's busiest airport H as well as those right accross the UK are back in business tonight but safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.

This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: oo李莎oo    时间: 2010-4-26 14:38

[Homework] 2010-04-26 All UK Airports Re-Open Following Tests
After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flight paths around lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regulates airlines has put in place special rules.
“The CAA's revised *(step by step?) space guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessments and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to reporting scheme run by the CAA.”
British Airways, which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.
“I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief is that we could have safely continued operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in due course and would share the data that we have. And we'll share the learning steps that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others who would put forward a different view to me.”
Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, that constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.
“There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would not affect any UK airports. But day by day, announcements will be made in respect of those no-fly zones.”
It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Stornoway managed to get into the air.
“But we're nervous about flying anyway. But I…it's only 45 minutes flight from here to Stornoway. So I think I should survive.”
These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.
“We're back on peace. We're now going to *coach study down south to just north of London. So we're not home yet. But we're on our way.  
“Yes we'll flying 10 kilometres from the volcano in *. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know *from across France. We think a lot. It’s mad.  
It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would have liked action more quickly.
“We would have liked governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed so far so good. We know we're getting the process to flying people home.
Europe's busiest airport Heathrow as well as those right across the UK are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.
作者: windfeng    时间: 2010-4-28 19:41

HW

After 6 long and unprecedented days, Britain's airports have reopened. There remain no-fly zones, but safe flights path surround lingering ash cloud will be identified on a daily basis. And the body that regulates airlines has put in place special rules.

“The CAA's revised airspace guidance requires airlines first to conduct their own risk assessment and develop operational procedures to address any remaining risks. Secondly, put in place an intensive maintenance ash damage inspection before and after each flight. And thirdly report any ash-related incidents to a reporting scheme run by the CAA.”

British Airways, which called the flight ban unnecessary after staging its own test 2 days ago with Willey Wash on board, has been losing 20 million pounds a day and is delighted by this new development.

“I don't believe that it was necessary to impose a blanket ban on all UK airspace last Thursday. My personal belief there is that we could safely continue operation for a period of time. I think there were occasions when the decision to close airspace could have been justified. But as I said, you know, that's a personal view. We'll sit down in deal course and somebody share the data that we have. And we'll share the learnings that we have had over this period. And I'm sure there would be others soon would put forward a different view to me.”

Meanwhile, a transport secretary was keen to stress that caution is not being thrown to the wind, the constant monitoring of the ash cloud and its potential for danger will continue.

“There will still be no-fly zones. The Met Office and the Civil Aviation Authority advised me that on the basis of the current presence of the ash cloud, those no-fly zones would not affect any UK airports. But day by day, announcements will be made in respect of those no-fly zones.”

It was the day Britain was supposed to fly again better late than never. Only a lucky few like those aboard this flight from Edinburgh to Sternway managed to get into the air.

“But we're nervous flying anyway. But it's only 45 minutes from here to Sternway. I think I should survive.”

These students have flown back into Edinburgh from Iceland and their geography field trip has turned out in the shadow of an erupting volcano.

“We're back on peace. We're now going 10-hour cold journey down South to just north of London. So we're not home yet, but we know we'll.”

“It's flying 10 kilometers from the volcano in COD planes. And yet... you know, all the way back in England, people won't even know we escaped from across France and thinks of that as mad.  

It's clear that those in the package holiday industry would have liked to action more quickly.”

“We would have liked governments from around Europe to get around the table a little bit more quickly. We would certainly say that. But at the moment, we're happy that things have changed. So far so good, we know we're getting the process to fly people home.”

Europe's busiest airport Heathrow as well as those, right across the UK, are back in business tonight. But safely dealing with the backlog built through 6 flightless days presents the next challenge.




欢迎光临 普特英语听力论坛 (http://forum.putclub.com/) Powered by Discuz! 7.0.0