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[BBC] 【整理】 BBC 2008-02-09

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BBC 2008-02-09


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BBC Correspondents
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【整理】 by Julie

BBC news with Nick Kelly.

The United States army has produced a new operations manual which says that winning hearts and minds will in future be as important as defeating the enemy on the battlefield. One of the authors of the manual, General William Caldwell told the BBC that there would be a new emphasis on what he called brain power. He said that the experience of Iraq and Afghanistan showed that stabilizing countries required other skills.

'It's a different skill set. You know, we are very proficient and effective and build our equipment and other systems so that we conduct offense and defense, you know, lethal operations very, very effectively. But this other side house, this stability operations does require a different mindset, and therefore that's why we've written it into our doctrinal manual and said to bring it on par, make it equal to, just as important as lethal operations.'

The leader of the Anglican Church Rowan Williams has moved to defuse a row over comments he made on the role in Britain of Islamic law, or Shariah. The Archbishop of Canterbury's words have provoked a storm of protest. But in the statement, he denied that he called for the introduction of Shariah in parallel with civil law. He said he merely wanted to explore the rights of religious minorities in a secular state.

Two senior United Nations officials have warned that the conflict in the Sudanese region of Darfur is spiraling toward full-scale war. The UN special envoy Jan Eliasson told the UN Security Council that the latest reports that Sudanese government aircraft forces and militia had attacked three towns showed how disturbing the situation had become. Another UN official Jean-Marie Guéhenno said the recent coup attempt in neighboring Chad had worsened the situation in Darfur, with Chad accusing Sudan of backing the rebels. Laura Trevelyan reports from the United Nations.

Jean-Marie Guéhenno is the man ultimately responsible for the 9000 peace-keepers wearing the UN's blue beret in Darfur. And he is deeply worried about that force. The crisis in neighboring Chad has created an atmosphere of mistrust between the two countries, said Mr. Guéhenno, and risks widening the Darfur conflict to international dimensions. The UN envoy working on getting peace talks going between the government of Sudan and the rebel groups was pessimistic, too. The situation was running out of control, warned Jan Eliasson, saying political talks couldn't get going against the backdrop of such violence.

Finance ministers and central bankers from the group of seven leading economies are meeting in Tokyo shortly to discuss how to end the recent turmoil in global markets and to head off the threat of a world economic slowdown. The host, Japan, wants to increase transparency in banks and financial institutions. Japan, the United States and Britain are also proposing a new fund to help developing nations adopt new technologies to fight global warming. Officials are playing down expectations of concerted action to boost the global economy.

World news from the BBC.

The former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan says progress is being made towards reconciling the Kenyan government with its political opponents who refused to accept Mwai Kibaki as president. They say his reelection last December was rigged. Kofi Annan has held talks with both sides in Nairobi and says ideas are taking shape for sharing power.

The Turkish parliament is expected to amend the country's constitution today to pave the way for the lifting of a ban on the Islamic headscarf in universities. The amendment is part of the government efforts to end the ban which it says deprives thousands of girls of a high education. Sarah Rainsford reports from Ankara.

There is widespread public support for the move. But Turkey's powerful establishments, including the military, senior judges and academics are fiercely opposed. They claim it’s just the first of many steps by the current religious conservative government to introduce Islam to public and to political life. And they argue that a strict secular system is what keeps this country modern, moderate and democratic.

Turkish community leaders in Germany are appealing for calm amid fears of rising tensions after fire killed 9 Turks in the southwestern town of Ludwigshafen last Sunday. There's been speculation that there may have been a racist attack by neo-Nazis. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said the fire is a terrible incident that has shaken everyone in Germany as well as Turkey, but she said coming to hasty conclusions would be harmful.

And the Euro Millions Lottery has announced that 16 people have shared a record jackpot of about 190 million dollars. Each winning ticket was worth around 12 million dollars. Six of them were bought in Britain and five were bought in France. If there had been a single winner, the award would have beaten the world record for lottery win, which stands at 114 million dollars.

BBC news.
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Homework

BBC news with Nick Kelly.

The United States army has produced a new operations menu which says that winning hearts and minds will in future be as important as defeating the enemy on the battlefield. One of the authors of the menu, General William Caldwell told the BBC that there would be a new emphasis on what he called brain power. He said that the experience of Iraq and Afghanistan show that stabilizing countries required other skills.

"It's a different skill, though. You know, we are very proficient and effective and build our equipment and all systems so that we can conduct offense, defense, you know, * operations very very effectively. But the other side of the house, the stability operation does require different mindset in there, for that's why we've written it into our operational menu and said to bring it on par, make it equal to, just as important as * operations."

The leader of the Anglican Church Rowan Williams has moved to defuse a row over comments he made on the role in Britain of Islamic law, or Shariah. The Archbishop of Canterbury's words have provoked a storm of protest. But in the statement, he denied that he called for the introduction of Shariah in parallel with civil law. He said he merely wanted to explore the rights of religious minorities in a secular state.

Two senior United Nations officials have warned that the conflict in the Sudanese region of Darfur is spiraling toward full scale war. The UN special envoy Jan Eliasson told the UN Security Council that the latest reports that Sudanese government aircraft forces and militia had attacked three towns showed how disturbing the situation had become. Another UN official Jean-Marie Guéhenno said the recent * in neighboring Chad had worsened the situation in Darfur, with Chad accusing Sudan of backing the rebels. Laura Trevelyan reports from the United Nations.

Jean-Marie Guéhenno is the man ultimately responsible for the 9,000 peace-keepers wearing the UN's blue beret in Darfur. He is deeply worried about that force. The crisis in neighboring Chad has created an atmosphere of mistrust between the two countries, said Mr. Guéhenno, and risks widening the Darfur conflict to international dimensions. The UN envoy working on getting peace talks going between the government of Sudan and the rebel groups was pessimistic, too. The situation was running out of control, warned Jan Eliasson, saying political talks couldn't get going against the backdrop of such violence.

Finance ministers and central bankers from the group of seven leading economies are meeting in Tokyo shortly to discuss how to end the recent turmoil in global markets and to head off the threat of world economic slow-down. The host, Japan, wants to increase transparency in banks and financial institutions. Japan, the United States and Britain are also proposing a new fund to help developing countries adopt new technologies to fight global warming. Officials are playing down expectations of concerted action to boost the global economy.

World news from the BBC.

The former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan says progress is being made towards reconciling the Kenyan government with its political opponents who refused to accept Mwai Kibaki as president. They say his re-election last December was rigged. Kofi Annan has held talks with both sides in Nairobi and says ideas are taking shape for sharing power.

The Turkish parliament is expected to amend the country's constitution today to pave the way for the lifting of a ban on the Islamic headscarf in universities. The amendment is part of the government efforts to end the ban which it says deprives thousands of girls of high education. Sarah Rainsford reports from Ankara.

There's widespread public support for the move. But Turkey's powerful establishments, including the military, senior judges and academics are fiercely opposed. They claim it is just the first of many steps by the current religious conservative government to introduce Islam to public *and political life and they argue that a strict secular system is what keeps this country modern, moderate and democratic.

Turkish community leaders in Germany are appealing for calm amid fears of rising tensions after fire killed 9 Turks in the southwestern town of Ludwigshafen last Sunday. There's been speculation that may have been a racist attack by neo-Nazis. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said the fire is a terrible incident that has shaken everyone in Germany as well as Turkey, but she said coming to hasty conclusions would be harmful.

And EuroMillions Lottery has announced that 16 people have shared a record jackpot about 119 million dollars, each winning ticket was worth around 12 million dollars. Six of them were bought in Britain and five were bought in France. If that had been a single winner, the award would've beaten the world record for lottery win, which stands at 114 million dollars.

BBC news.
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On Tina12

BBC news with Nick Kelly.

The United States army has produced a new operations menu which says that winning hearts and minds will in future be as important as defeating the enemy on the battlefield. One of the authors of the menu, General William Caldwell told the BBC that there would be a new emphasis on what he called brain power. He said that the experience of Iraq and Afghanistan show that stabilizing countries required other skills.

"It's a different skillset. You know, we are very proficient and effective and build our equipment and all systems so that we can conduct offense, defense, you know, lethal operations very very effectively. But the other side of the house, the stability operation does require different mindset in there, for that's why we've written it into our doctrinal menu and said to bring it on par, make it equal to, and just as important as lethal operations."

The leader of the Anglican Church Rowan Williams has moved to defuse a row over comments he made on the role in Britain of Islamic law, or Shariah. The Archbishop of Canterbury's words have provoked a storm of protest. But in the statement, he denied that he called for the introduction of Shariah in parallel with civil law. He said he merely wanted to explore the rights of religious minorities in a secular state.

Two senior United Nations officials have warned that the conflict in the Sudanese region of Darfur is spiraling toward full scale war. The UN special envoy Jan Eliasson told the UN Security Council that the latest reports that Sudanese government aircraft forces and militia had attacked three towns showed how disturbing the situation had become. Another UN official Jean-Marie Guéhenno said the recent coup attempt in neighboring Chad had worsened the situation in Darfur, with Chad accusing Sudan of backing the rebels. Laura Trevelyan reports from the United Nations.

Jean-Marie Guéhenno is the man ultimately responsible for the 9,000 peace-keepers wearing the UN's blue beret in Darfur. He is deeply worried about that force. The crisis in neighboring Chad has created an atmosphere of mistrust between the two countries, said Mr. Guéhenno, and risks widening the Darfur conflict to international dimensions. The UN envoy working on getting peace talks going between the government of Sudan and the rebel groups was pessimistic, too. The situation was running out of control, warned Jan Eliasson, saying political talks couldn't get going against the backdrop of such violence.

Finance ministers and central bankers from the group of seven leading economies are meeting in Tokyo shortly to discuss how to end the recent turmoil in global markets and to head off the threat of world economic slow-down. The host, Japan, wants to increase transparency in banks and financial institutions. Japan, the United States and Britain are also proposing a new fund to help developing countries adopt new technologies to fight global warming. Officials are playing down expectations of concerted action to boost the global economy.

World news from the BBC.

The former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan says progress is being made towards reconciling the Kenyan government with its political opponents who refused to accept Mwai Kibaki as president. They say his re-election last December was rigged. Kofi Annan has held talks with both sides in Nairobi and says ideas are taking shape for sharing power.

The Turkish parliament is expected to amend the country's constitution today to pave the way for the lifting of a ban on the Islamic headscarf in universities. The amendment is part of the government efforts to end the ban which it says deprives thousands of girls of high education. Sarah Rainsford reports from Ankara.

There's widespread public support for the move. But Turkey's powerful establishments, including the military, senior judges and academics are fiercely opposed. They claim it is just the first of many steps by the current religious conservative government to introduce Islam to public *and political life and they argue that a strict secular system is what keeps this country modern, moderate and democratic.

Turkish community leaders in Germany are appealing for calm amid fears of rising tensions after fire killed 9 Turks in the southwestern town of Ludwigshafen last Sunday. There's been speculation that may have been a racist attack by neo-Nazis. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said the fire is a terrible incident that has shaken everyone in Germany as well as Turkey, but she said coming to hasty conclusions would be harmful.

And EuroMillions Lottery has announced that 16 people have shared a record jackpot about 119 million dollars, each winning ticket was worth around 12 million dollars. Six of them were bought in Britain and five were bought in France. If that had been a single winner, the award would've beaten the world record for lottery win, which stands at 114 million dollars.

BBC news.
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BBC news with Nick Kelly.

The United States army has produced a new operations manual which says that winning hearts and minds will in future be as important as defeating the enemy on the battlefield. One of the authors of the manual, General William Caldwell told the BBC that there would be a new emphasis on what he called brain power. He said that the experience of Iraq and Afghanistan show that stabilizing countries required other skills.

"It's a different skill, though. You know, we are very proficient and effective and build our equipment and our systems so that we can conduct offense, defense, you know, lethal operations very very effectively. But at the other side of the house, the stability operation does require different mindset in there, for that's why we've written it into our doctrinal manual and said to bring it on par, make it equal to, / just as important as lethal operations."

The leader of the Anglican Church Rowan Williams has moved to defuse a row over comments he made on the role in Britain of Islamic law, or Shariah. The Archbishop of Canterbury's words have provoked a storm of protest. But in the statement, he denied that he called for the introduction of Shariah in parallel with civil law. He said he merely wanted to explore the rights of religious minorities in a secular state.

Two senior United Nations officials have warned that the conflict in the Sudanese region of Darfur is spiraling toward full scale war. The UN special envoy Jan Eliasson told the UN Security Council that the latest reports that Sudanese government aircraft forces and militia had attacked three towns showed how disturbing the situation had become. Another UN official Jean-Marie Guéhenno said the recent coup attempt in neighboring Chad had worsened the situation in Darfur, with Chad accusing Sudan of backing the rebels. Laura Trevelyan reports from the United Nations.

Jean-Marie Guéhenno is the man ultimately responsible for the 9,000 peace-keepers wearing the UN's blue beret in Darfur. He is deeply worried about that force. The crisis in neighboring Chad has created an atmosphere of mistrust between the two countries, said Mr. Guéhenno, and risks widening the Darfur conflict to international dimensions. The UN envoy working on getting peace talks going between the government of Sudan and the rebel groups was pessimistic, too. The situation was running out of control, warned Jan Eliasson, saying political talks couldn't get going against the backdrop of such violence.

Finance ministers and central bankers from the group of seven leading economies are meeting in Tokyo shortly to discuss how to end the recent turmoil in global markets and to head off the threat of world economic slow-down. The host, Japan, wants to increase transparency in banks and financial institutions. Japan, the United States and Britain are also proposing a new fund to help developing nations adopt new technologies to fight global warming. Officials are playing down expectations of concerted action to boost the global economy.

World news from the BBC.

The former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan says progress is being made towards reconciling the Kenyan government with its political opponents who refused to accept Mwai Kibaki as president. They say his re-election last December was rigged. Kofi Annan has held talks with both sides in Nairobi and says ideas are taking shape for sharing power.

The Turkish parliament is expected to amend the country's constitution today to pave the way for the lifting of a ban on the Islamic headscarf in universities. The amendment is part of the government efforts to end the ban which it says deprives thousands of girls of high education. Sarah Rainsford reports from Ankara.

There's a widespread public support for the move. But Turkey's powerful establishments, including the military, senior judges and academics are fiercely opposed. They claim it is just the first of many steps by the current religious conservative government to introduce Islam to public and political life and they argue that a strict secular system is what keeps this country modern, moderate and democratic.

Turkish community leaders in Germany are appealing for calm amid fears of rising tensions after fire killed 9 Turks in the southwestern town of Ludwigshafen last Sunday. There's been speculation that may have been a racist attack by neo-Nazis. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said the fire is a terrible incident that has shaken everyone in Germany as well as Turkey, but she said coming to hasty conclusions would be harmful.

And EuroMillions Lottery has announced that 16 people have shared a record jackpot about 190 million dollars, each winning ticket was worth around 12 million dollars. Six of them were bought in Britain and five were bought in France. If there’s been a single winner, the award would've beaten the world record for lottery win, which stands at 114 million dollars.

BBC news.


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BBC news with Nick Kelly.

The United States army has produced a new operations manual which says that winning hearts and minds will in future be as important as defeating the enemy on the battlefield. One of the authors of the manual, General William Caldwell told the BBC that there would be a new emphasis on what he called brain power. He said that the experience of Iraq and Afghanistan show that stabilizing countries required other skills.

"It's a different skill, though. You know, we are very proficient and effective and build our equipment and other systems so that we can conduct offense, defense, you know, lethal operations very very effectively. But at the other side of the house, the stability operation does require different mindset in there, for that's why we've written it into our doctrinal manual and said to bring it on a par, make it equal to, just as important as lethal operations."

The leader of the Anglican Church Rowan Williams has moved to defuse a row over comments he made on the role in Britain of Islamic law, or Shariah. The Archbishop of Canterbury's words have provoked a storm of protest. But in the statement, he denied that he called for the introduction of Shariah in parallel with civil law. He said he merely wanted to explore the rights of religious minorities in a secular state.

Two senior United Nations officials have warned that the conflict in the Sudanese region of Darfur is spiraling toward full scale war. The UN special envoy Jan Eliasson told the UN Security Council that the latest reports that Sudanese government aircraft forces and militia had attacked three towns showed how disturbing the situation had become. Another UN official Jean-Marie Guéhenno said the recent coup attempt in neighboring Chad had worsened the situation in Darfur, with Chad accusing Sudan of backing the rebels. Laura Trevelyan reports from the United Nations.

Jean-Marie Guéhenno is the man ultimately responsible for the 9,000 peace-keepers wearing the UN's blue beret in Darfur. He is deeply worried about that force. The crisis in neighboring Chad has created an atmosphere of mistrust between the two countries, said Mr. Guéhenno, and risks widening the Darfur conflict to international dimensions. The UN envoy working on getting peace talks going between the government of Sudan and the rebel groups was pessimistic, too. The situation was running out of control, warned Jan Eliasson, saying political talks couldn't get going against the backdrop of such violence.

Finance ministers and central bankers from the group of seven leading economies are meeting in Tokyo shortly to discuss how to end the recent turmoil in global markets and to head off the threat of world economic slow-down. The host, Japan, wants to increase transparency in banks and financial institutions. Japan, the United States and Britain are also proposing a new fund to help developing nations adopt new technologies to fight global warming. Officials are playing down expectations of concerted action to boost the global economy.

World news from the BBC.

The former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan says progress is being made towards reconciling the Kenyan government with its political opponents who refused to accept Mwai Kibaki as president. They say his re-election last December was rigged. Kofi Annan has held talks with both sides in Nairobi and says ideas are taking shape for sharing power.

The Turkish parliament is expected to amend the country's constitution today to pave the way for the lifting of a ban on the Islamic headscarf in universities. The amendment is part of the government efforts to end the ban which it says deprives thousands of girls of high education. Sarah Rainsford reports from Ankara.

There's a widespread public support for the move. But Turkey's powerful establishments, including the military, senior judges and academics are fiercely opposed. They claim it is just the first of many steps by the current religious conservative government to introduce Islam to public and political life and they argue that a strict secular system is what keeps this country modern, moderate and democratic.

Turkish community leaders in Germany are appealing for calm amid fears of rising tensions after fire killed 9 Turks in the southwestern town of Ludwigshafen last Sunday. There's been speculation that may have been a racist attack by neo-Nazis. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said the fire is a terrible incident that has shaken everyone in Germany as well as Turkey, but she said coming to hasty conclusions would be harmful.

And EuroMillions Lottery has announced that 16 people have shared a record jackpot about 190 million dollars, each winning ticket was worth around 12 million dollars. Six of them were bought in Britain and five were bought in France. If there’s been a single winner, the award would've beaten the world record for lottery win, which stands at 140 million dollars.

BBC news.
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