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[BBC] 【整理】BBC Podcast 2008-10-08

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a less-than-fair economy 作何解释?

insurance, in terms of insurance service, it can be traded.
All sunshine without shade, all pleasure without pain, is not life at all.

原帖由 brightu 于 2008-10-10 12:02 发表 a less-than-fair economy 作何解释?insurance, in terms of insurance service, it can be traded.

 

 

should be "laissez-fair economy"

 

an economic ideology which advocates minimal state intervention on the economy.

 

for more details, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laissez-faire

[ 本帖最后由 jjmm 于 2008-10-10 18:46 编辑 ]
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to 北星束

 

"Right so open in the early 19th century..." 这里的也是我一直没搞懂的一个地方,不过你这个version 我还是不懂? 能否赐教?

 

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先佩服下MM ,那个法语单词倒是见过,但是不是偶得积极听力词汇,惭愧,话说回来,那个less-than-fair economy其实也有这个说法得...

 

那个so open in the...其实也是给丫头参考下啦,right,  so open in the early 19th century...意思美国一部分地区与19世纪开放之类之类的,不知是否可以?

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a novice input

Great job of transcription. But here is my 2 cents if you will.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

if brought into use.. (not "to be brought into use")
value-added (not valuated)
new opportunities (not "if you got opportunities")
Right? So in the early 19th... (not "right so open in the early 19th century")
long before all, that's there in the west to be ...
all heed things for themselves (out hit? come on...)
labor market of the works, all heed things for themselves...
...consequence of failure if that is what happens.
...automobile sector where the transplants are and the southeast,
very wide range, between aircraft, car parts...
we don't know for sure what the figure's gona be..
we are expecting the growth to be [as] close as zero...

1

评分次数

  • 北星束

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
把MerylFriend的修改整理出来,给高手打打杂

The United States is the biggest economy in the world by a large margin.
 

Andrew Walker, economics and business correspondent for the BBC World Service.


One figure that’s often used to indicate this is what’s called Gross Domestic Product, GDP, which is the value of the total production of goods and services in the course of the year. And for the United States, that figure is around 14 trillion dollars, that’s to say, 14,000 billion dollars. The country that comes second is either China with a figure of 7 trillion or Japan with a figure of 4.3 trillion.


My name is Chrismans. I am a lecturer in economic history at the London School of Economics. One good reason why America is, actually has been for a long time, the global superpower, as opposed to, say, other rich countries like Japan or Germany, is size. The US has a large manufacturing sector. It has large service sector. It has geographical diversity, very different people living in different places. So, it’s a big diverse economy.


I think the most important thing that drives America is innovation.


Peter Morici is an economist and professor of business at the University of Maryland.

 

It’s not just the resources that we have, but because we have to pay such high wages to our people,we have to produce very high value-added products. We're kind of like the German economy in that regard or the British economy.

 

So how has the US economy evolved?

 

There is [are] a couple of themes to talk about, if you wanna think about American development from say, 1800. One is the frontier, the point which Europeans have settled is constantly moving west. The frontier means that there is new arable land that’s highly productive if brought into use. You can easily move within the United States new opportunities, and lability within the US is something we still see today, America is a highly geographically mobile society. What we also see as we move west is Americans discovered the diversity of the land that they are living in. Right? So in the early 19th century, parts of the United States are suitable for manufacturing, coz they have coal deposits, then the late 19th century, things like oil become important, and long before all, that’s there in the west, to be exploited at the right time. And because America doesn’t have these internal trade boundaries, from the beginning, it means that there’s a lot of interstate trade, Connecticut can specialize in insurance(really?, insurance can be traded?); Iowa can specialize in wheat; Texas can specialize in oil, and they can trade with each other as European economies might do if it wasn’t for trade barriers and politics.

 

America became the superpower that it is, largely because it was isolated from Europe and it had developed its own technology. To some degree, the Europeans tried to keep technology from us. So we had to kinda solve the problems for ourselves. One of the biggest problems we had in the early decades of the republic was access to capital. We really didn’t have enough money in the country. But foreign money came, it financed the canals and the turnpike building and so forth which untied the country to some measure. After the Civil War, Americans became great innovators. You think about it! The phonograph, the motion picture. All those things had beginnings in America. Americans were pioneers in spaceflight. We’ve built the first mass production automobile. And that set off an era of middle class prosperity because eventually it was accompanied by U-- unionization, and so that the production workers got a bigger chunk of the money. And in turn, they started sending their kids to college. And we became a knowledge-driven society.

 

The free market that evolved in the United States is still practiced there today.

 

The idea of a less-than-fair economy is you let people, the owners of capital, the labor market, the workers, all heed things for themselves. You don’t need to set prices; you don’t need to set wages; you don’t need to tell some people to work in this sector and not in another. So it’s cheap. It’s efficient. And that is very attractive.

 

There have been episodes in American history when governments had got a lot more involved. The Second World War is the most obvious example of where government was very heavily involved in the day-to-day business of economic life. Ultimately, I think, many Americans take the view that economies work best if private individuals are left to get on with things to have the opportunity to get the rewards of succeeding from their own enterprise. But for the most part, they take the view that it’s best to let them suffer the consequences of failure if that’s what happens.

 

You are listening to the Instant Guide to the US economy on the BBC. The US economy can be divided into two main areas. Whilst the industrial sector accounts for about 20% of the United States’ economy, close to 80% of it is dominated by service industries. These include financial services, restaurants, entertainment and domestic services. Economist, Peter Morici.

 

The US economy is so diversified. It’s hard to say there is a main employer. I mean in New York City, it's clearly the financial sector, and the media. If you go to the Midwest, the main employers are manufacturing and agriculture from western Pennsylvania all the way through Minnesota. On the West Coast, we have a lot of high-technology. And we have the airspace industry in the Pacific Northwest, in Washington. Also in Missouri, people don’t realize that, Missouri and Kansas has a lot of airspace. In the south, we have our emerging new automobile sector where the transplants are and the southeast, places like Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, and so forth.

 

So what does the United States export and to whom? The BBC’s Andrew Walker.

 

The United States exports a wide range of goods and services. But there’s a group of things called capital goods which includes a very wide range, between aircraft, car parts, telecommunications, equipment. That accounts for just about half of the exports of goods. But there’s also a significant trade in agricultural products, soybeans, for example, and corn are very important. The leading partners are the immediate neighbors, so Canada, and Mexico. But China is also important, so is Japan and the European Union.

 

With the Europeans, we trade just about everything. With Japan, we import a lot of cars, Korea, the same. And we send them a lot of high-tech products, a lot high valuated services, like financial services, logistic services, things of that nature. And the same applies to China. And they provide us with a lot of consumer goods, things like coffee makers, T-shirts, and electronic products and assembly.    

 

So what state is the current US economy in?   

 

The United States is clearly in a period of at best rather weaker than normal economic growth. In the fourth quarter of last year, it actually shrank slightly. The first quarter of this year, it managed some rather anemic weak growth. The domestic economy is really decidedly weak. Consumer spending is still growing. But it has slowed down. And one area where the US economy has been in significant difficulty for some time now is house building. That basically is in the middle of what only can be described as a slump. It began declining in the beginning of 2006 and has fallen by a total of 34% since then. There is no universally agreed definition of a recession. One that is very widely used, however, in relation to the rich countries is two consecutive quarters in which gross domestic product, total output of goods and services declines. Is the US in a recession in that sense? It might be, we don’t know for sure what the figure's gonna be for the current three-month period.

 

Right now, the US economy is slowing down. Second quarter growth was about 2.8%. But we’re expecting the growth to be [as] close as zero for the next three quarters. And unemployment’s about 6.1%, we’re expecting that to drift up to about 7. And we’re expecting that a new president will likely have to focus on resurrecting the economy. And if the financial crisis does not turn out to be too severe, the US economy should turn up in the second half of next year.


All sunshine without shade, all pleasure without pain, is not life at all.
实现无障碍英语沟通
"lability within the US" should be "the mobility within the US...". IMHO.
1

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  • jjmm

普特听力大课堂

预整理(on brightu and merylfriend)

欢迎继续修改!!---jjmm

 

 

The United States is the biggest economy in the world by a large margin.
 

Andrew Walker, economics and business correspondent for the BBC World Service.

 

One figure that’s often used to indicate this is what’s called Gross Domestic Product, GDP, which is the value of the total production of goods and services in the course of the year. And for the United States, that figure is around 14 trillion dollars, that’s to say, 14,000 billion dollars. The country that comes second is either China with a figure of 7 trillion or Japan with a figure of 4.3 trillion.

 

My name is Chrismans. I am a lecturer in economic history at the London School of Economics. One good reason why America is, actually has been for a long time, the global superpower, as opposed to, say, other rich countries like Japan or Germany, is size. The US has a large manufacturing sector. It has large service sector. It has geographical diversity, very different people living in different places. So, it’s a big diverse economy.

 

I think the most important thing that drives America is innovation.

 

Peter Morici is an economist and professor of business at the University of Maryland.

 

It’s not just the resources that we have, but because we have to pay such high wages to our peoplewe have to produce very high value-added products. We're kind of like the German economy in that regard or the British economy.

 

So how has the US economy evolved?

 

There is [are] a couple of themes to talk about, if you wanna think about American development from say, 1800. One is the frontier, the point which Europeans are settled is constantly moving west. The frontier means that there is new arable land that’s highly productive if brought into use. You can easily move within the United States new opportunities, and the mobility within the US is something we still see today, America is a highly geographically mobile society. What we also see as we move west is Americans discovered the diversity of the land that they are living in. Right? So in the early 19th century, parts of the United States are suitable for manufacturing, coz they have coal deposits, then the late 19th century, things like oil become important, and long before all, that’s there in the west, to be exploited at the right time. And because America doesn’t have these internal trade boundaries, from the beginning, it means that there’s a lot of interstate trade, Connecticut can specialize in insurance; Iowa can specialize in wheat; Texas can specialize in oil, and they can trade with each other as European economies might do if it wasn’t for trade barriers and politics.

 

America became the superpower that it is, largely because it was isolated from Europe and it had developed its own technology. To some degree, the Europeans tried to keep technology from us. So we had to kinda solve the problems for ourselves. One of the biggest problems we had in the early decades of the republic was access to capital. We really didn’t have enough money in the country. But foreign money came, it financed the canals and the turnpike building and so forth which untied the country to some measure. After the Civil War, Americans became great innovators. You think about it! The phonograph, the motion picture. All those things had beginnings in America. Americans were pioneers in spaceflight. We’ve built the first mass production automobile. And that set off an era of middle class prosperity because eventually it was accompanied by unionization, and so that the production workers got a bigger chunk of the money. And in turn, they started sending their kids to college. And we became a knowledge-driven society.

 

The free market that evolved in the United States is still practiced there today.

 

The idea of a laissez-fair economy is you let people, the owners of capital, the labor market, the workers, all heed things for themselves. You don’t need to set prices; you don’t need to set wages; you don’t need to tell some people to work in this sector and not in another. So it’s cheap. It’s efficient. And that is very attractive.

 

There have been episodes in American history when governments had got a lot more involved. The Second World War is the most obvious example of where government was very heavily involved in the day-to-day business of economic life. Ultimately, I think, many Americans take the view that economies work best if private individuals are left to get on with things to have the opportunity to get the rewards of succeeding from their own enterprise. But for the most part, they take the view that it’s best to let them suffer the consequences of failure if that’s what happens.

 

You are listening to the Instant Guide to the US economy on the BBC. The US economy can be divided into two main areas. Whilst the industrial sector accounts for about 20% of the United States’ economy, close to 80% of it is dominated by service industries. These include financial services, restaurants, entertainment and domestic services. Economist, Peter Morici.

 

The US economy is so diversified. It’s hard to say there is a main employer. I mean in New York City, it's clearly the financial sector, and the media. If you go to the Midwest, the main employers are manufacturing and agriculture from western Pennsylvania all the way through Minnesota. On the West Coast, we have a lot of high-technology. And we have the aerospace industry in the Pacific Northwest, in Washington. Also in Missouri, people don’t realize that, Missouri and Kansas has a lot of aerospace. In the south, we have our emerging new automobile sector where the transplants are and the southeast, places like Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, and so forth.

 

So what does the United States export and to whom? The BBC’s Andrew Walker.

 

The United States exports a wide range of goods and services. But there’s a group of things called capital goods which includes a very wide range, including aircraft, car parts, telecommunications, equipment. That accounts for just about half of the exports of goods. But there’s also a significant trade in agricultural products, soybeans, for example, and corn are very important. The leading partners are the immediate neighbors, so Canada, and Mexico. But China is also important, so is Japan and the European Union.

 

With the Europeans, we trade just about everything. With Japan, we import a lot of cars, Korea, the same. And we send them a lot of high-tech products, a lot high valuated services, like financial services, logistic services, things of that nature. And the same applies to China. And they provide us with a lot of consumer goods, things like coffee makers, T-shirts, and electronic products and assembly.    

 

So what state is the current US economy in?   

 

The United States is clearly in a period of at best rather weaker than normal economic growth. In the fourth quarter of last year, it actually shrank slightly. The first quarter of this year, it managed some rather anemic weak growth. The domestic economy is really decidedly weak. Consumer spending is still growing. But it has slowed down. And one area where the US economy has been in significant difficulty for some time now is house building. That basically is in the middle of what only can be described as a slump. It began declining in the beginning of 2006 and has fallen by a total of 34% since then. There is no universally agreed definition of a recession. One that is very widely used, however, in relation to the rich countries is two consecutive quarters in which gross domestic product, total output of goods and services declines. Is the US in a recession in that sense? It might be, we don’t know for sure what the figure's gonna be for the current three-month period.

 

Right now, the US economy is slowing down. Second quarter growth was about 2.8%. But we’re expecting the growth to be [as] close as zero for the next three quarters. And unemployment’s about 6.1%, we’re expecting that to drift up to about 7. And we’re expecting that a new president will likely have to focus on resurrecting the economy. And if the financial crisis does not turn out to be too severe, the US economy should turn up in the second half of next year.

 

[ 本帖最后由 jjmm 于 2008-10-11 16:02 编辑 ]
好栏目推荐之美国口语俚语

Two cents from “senior” me?

 

>highly productive if to be brought into use(with “to be”, to be exact)

>So up in the early 19th century(sounds more likely with an”up”)

>and lo and behold, that’s there in the west(not whatever the ”high hand” has said,  I give credit to whoever came up with this genius idea)

> accompanied by U---unionization(add a “U”, please, unionization is elaboration)

> outhit things for themselves.(IMHO, sounds more likely, I give credit to whoever has long before came up with this idea and due to my lousy network speed forgive me for not checking the “hero”)

> expecting the growth to be /close at zero(here, “close” is an adv)

 

brightu 斑斑是否可以为我打打下手呀?呵呵,kiddingcome right away~

The United States is the biggest economy in the world by a large margin.
 

Andrew Walker, economics and business correspondent for the BBC World Service.

 

One figure that’s often used to indicate this is what’s called Gross Domestic Product, GDP, which is the value of the total production of goods and services in the course of the year. And for the United States, that figure is around 14 trillion dollars, that’s to say, 14,000 billion dollars. The country that comes second is either China with a figure of 7 trillion or Japan with a figure of 4.3 trillion.

 

My name is Chrismans. I am a lecturer in economic history at the London School of Economics. One good reason why America is, actually has been for a long time, the global superpower, as opposed to, say, other rich countries like Japan or Germany, is size. The US has a large manufacturing sector. It has large service sector. It has geographical diversity, very different people living in different places. So, it’s a big diverse economy.

 

I think the most important thing that drives America is innovation.

 

Peter Morici is an economist and professor of business at the University of Maryland.

 

It’s not just the resources that we have, but because we have to pay such high wages to our peoplewe have to produce very high value-added products. We're kind of like the German economy in that regard or the British economy.

 

So how has the US economy evolved?

 

There is [are] a couple of themes to talk about, if you wanna think about American development from say, 1800. One is the frontier, the point which Europeans are settled is constantly moving west. The frontier means that there is new arable land that’s highly productive if to be brought into use. You can easily move within the United States new opportunities, and the mobility within the US is something we still see today, America is a highly geographically mobile society. What we also see as we move west is Americans discovered the diversity of the land that they are living in. Right? So up in the early 19th century, parts of the United States are suitable for manufacturing, coz they have coal deposits, then the late 19th century, things like oil become important, and lo and behold, that’s there in the west, to be exploited at the right time. And because America doesn’t have these internal trade boundaries, from the beginning, it means that there’s a lot of interstate trade, Connecticut can specialize in insurance; Iowa can specialize in wheat; Texas can specialize in oil, and they can trade with each other as European economies might do if it wasn’t for trade barriers and politics.

 

America became the superpower that it is, largely because it was isolated from Europe and it had developed its own technology. To some degree, the Europeans tried to keep technology from us. So we had to kinda solve the problems for ourselves. One of the biggest problems we had in the early decades of the republic was access to capital. We really didn’t have enough money in the country. But foreign money came, it financed the canals and the turnpike building and so forth which untied the country to some measure. After the Civil War, Americans became great innovators. You think about it! The phonograph, the motion picture. All those things had beginnings in America. Americans were pioneers in spaceflight. We’ve built the first mass production automobile. And that set off an era of middle class prosperity because eventually it was accompanied by U---unionization, and so that the production workers got a bigger chunk of the money. And in turn, they started sending their kids to college. And we became a knowledge-driven society.

 

The free market that evolved in the United States is still practiced there today.

 

The idea of a laissez-fair economy is you let people, the owners of capital, the labor market, the workers, outhit things for themselves. You don’t need to set prices; you don’t need to set wages; you don’t need to tell some people to work in this sector and not in another. So it’s cheap. It’s efficient. And that is very attractive.

 

There have been episodes in American history when governments had got a lot more involved. The Second World War is the most obvious example of where government was very heavily involved in the day-to-day business of economic life. Ultimately, I think, many Americans take the view that economies work best if private individuals are left to get on with things to have the opportunity to get the rewards of succeeding from their own enterprise. But for the most part, they take the view that it’s best to let them suffer the consequences of failure if that’s what happens.

 

You are listening to the Instant Guide to the US economy on the BBC. The US economy can be divided into two main areas. Whilst the industrial sector accounts for about 20% of the United States’ economy, close to 80% of it is dominated by service industries. These include financial services, restaurants, entertainment and domestic services. Economist, Peter Morici.

 

The US economy is so diversified. It’s hard to say there is a main employer. I mean in New York City, it's clearly the financial sector, and the media. If you go to the Midwest, the main employers are manufacturing and agriculture from western Pennsylvania all the way through Minnesota. On the West Coast, we have a lot of high-technology. And we have the aerospace industry in the Pacific Northwest, in Washington. Also in Missouri, people don’t realize that, Missouri and Kansas has a lot of aerospace. In the south, we have our emerging new automobile sector where the transplants are and the southeast, places like Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, and so forth.

 

So what does the United States export and to whom? The BBC’s Andrew Walker.

 

The United States exports a wide range of goods and services. But there’s a group of things called capital goods which includes a very wide range, including aircraft, car parts, telecommunications, equipment. That accounts for just about half of the exports of goods. But there’s also a significant trade in agricultural products, soybeans, for example, and corn are very important. The leading partners are the immediate neighbors, so Canada, and Mexico. But China is also important, so is Japan and the European Union.

 

With the Europeans, we trade just about everything. With Japan, we import a lot of cars, Korea, the same. And we send them a lot of high-tech products, a lot high valuated services, like financial services, logistic services, things of that nature. And the same applies to China. And they provide us with a lot of consumer goods, things like coffee makers, T-shirts, and electronic products and assembly.    

 

So what state is the current US economy in?   

 

The United States is clearly in a period of at best rather weaker than normal economic growth. In the fourth quarter of last year, it actually shrank slightly. The first quarter of this year, it managed some rather anemic weak growth. The domestic economy is really decidedly weak. Consumer spending is still growing. But it has slowed down. And one area where the US economy has been in significant difficulty for some time now is house building. That basically is in the middle of what only can be described as a slump. It began declining in the beginning of 2006 and has fallen by a total of 34% since then. There is no universally agreed definition of a recession. One that is very widely used, however, in relation to the rich countries is two consecutive quarters in which gross domestic product, total output of goods and services declines. Is the US in a recession in that sense? It might be, we don’t know for sure what the figure's gonna be for the current three-month period.

 

Right now, the US economy is slowing down. Second quarter growth was about 2.8%. But we’re expecting the growth to be /close at zero for the next three quarters. And unemployment’s about 6.1%, we’re expecting that to drift up to about 7. And we’re expecting that a new president will likely have to focus on resurrecting the economy. And if the financial crisis does not turn out to be too severe, the US economy should turn up in the second half of next

 

 

 

 

 

ha ha..

北星束, no offense. My friend Meryl can do way better.
每天半小时 轻松提高英语口语

原帖由 MerylFriend 于 2008-10-11 20:11 发表 北星束, no offense. My friend Meryl can do way better.

 

 

 

as i was later informed by Meryl,friend of MerylFriend, i am here to retreat what i have said earlier, that is the first, the fifth ,and the sixth correction effort, the rest three, for ur reference only , jjmm, whether take it or not, as u please...

A good job well done

First off, hats off to the care-givers of this this forum. You have done a marvelous job in transcribing that script.

 

北星束, thank you for lending a sensible ear and keeping a tolerant and open mind in this.

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