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[自然百科] 【整理】2009-02-05 Ireland 爱尔兰

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[自然百科] 【整理】2009-02-05 Ireland 爱尔兰

Ireland

 

Although green is its emblematic color, Ireland’s verdant fields are not the nation’s only extraordinary natural features. Sculpted millions of years ago by the advance and retreat of vast shields of ice, the Emerald Isle harbors a wealth of wildlife among its craggy mountains, fog-shrouded coastlines, steep gorges, and vast networks of inland waterways.



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[ 本帖最后由 春山如笑 于 2009-2-7 11:39 编辑 ]

 

 

 

】——Fiona

 

This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea. Held once a year on Laytown Beach near Dublin, it reflects Ireland’s centuries-old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark on what time and nature have already made, just as he helped to mold the Irish landscape, animals, and plants.

 

And before humans, older, more profound forces were at work. This ancient land might seem timeless but change lies at its very heart. Ireland has rarely stood still. Ireland’s hills and mountains are formed from her oldest, hardest rocks. They’re part of the legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which this island is built.

 

But the landscapes we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere Ireland has been sculpted in some way by one of the greatest forces of nature, ice. For almost two million years, Ireland, like the rest of Europe was locked in the grip of the ice age. Glaciers, vast moving sheets of ice destroyed nearly all life and transformed the contours of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in Northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the summits, but the cold they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling steep ravines and deeply carved peaks.

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of this ice age legacy-- the Peregrine Falcon comes to the Mournes to nest. Remote rock faces and inaccessible ledges  are the safest place to raise their chicks. And the land around provides good hunting for the adults-- all good reasons why there’re more Peregrines here than anywhere else in Ireland. But even Peregrines couldn’t have lived here until the ice age ended, around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they staked their claim to Ireland Uplands isn’t clear. But since then their fortunes, like everything else, here have changed with the times. Today they’re wide spread throughout the country. But less than 40 years ago, Peregrines hit an all-time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just 27 successful nesting pairs, bringing them paralyzedly close to extinction. Only when the chemicals were banned did the Peregrines recovery begin. It’s been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape they inherited from the ice.

 

Ireland’s mountains lie scattered around her edge, encircling a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fens, and barks. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland’s most sacred mountain, Croagh Patrick. On this summit, Ireland’s patron saint is believed to have fasted for 40 days and nights. And today more than 1500 years later, the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year on Reek Sunday, the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St. Patrick’s footsteps. As the pilgrims make their steep descent, the view before them is another with its feet in the ice age, Clew Bay.

 

Well-backed islands are a testimony to the power of glaciers. Stones and soil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini-hills called Drummans. Then when the ice retreated and sea levels rose, these glacial relics were partly submerged, creating a drowned landscape.

 

In this water world, even the sheep are shepherded by boat, in traditional currachs powered by modern outboard motors. The popular belief is that there are 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the North Atlantic and their rocky shorelines are a sanctuary for common seals.

 

Clew Bay is one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen in time. Whole communities once carved a living from these islands, animals grazed, and homesteads grew up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing time has made this kind of life uneconomic today. Only seven of the islands are still inhabited.

 

There are ghosts of past lives all along this stretch of coast. Rockfleet Castle was one of many belonging to Grace O’Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates, who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideaways for the pirate galleys, the plundered passing ships. It’s hard to imagine such a turbulent past. All that's likely to disturb these waters today are otters hunting for food.

 

Notes:

chisel : cut or shape sth with a chisel 用凿子或錾子凿开或凿成某物

 

ravine : deep narrow steep-sided valley between mountains 既深且狭﹑ 坡度很大的山谷.

 

ledge : narrow horizontal shelf coming out from a wall, cliff, etc 水平的窄长架状突出物; 壁架; 岩石架

 

Reek Sunday : (爱尔兰)七月最后一个星期日。

 

currach : A coracle. 克勒克艇:一种科拉科尔小艇

 

homestead : The place where one's home is. 家园:某人住房所在地

 

 

 

 

[ Last edited by fionainnicemood at 2009-2-21 16:06 ]

普特在线文本比较普特在线听音查字普特在线拼写检查普特文本转音频

Homework

This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea. Held once a year on Laytown Beach near Dublin, it reflects Ireland’s centuries-old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark on what time and nature have already made, justly to help to mold the Irish landscape, animals, and plants.

 

And before humans, older, more profound forces were at work. This ancient land might’ve seen timeless but change lies at its very heart. Ireland has weariest to its still. Ireland’s hills and mountains are formed from her oldest, hardest rocks, their part of the legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which this island is built. But the landscapes we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere has been sculpted in some way by one of the greatest forces of nature, ice. For almost two million years, Ireland like the rest of Europe was locked in the grape of ice age. Glaciers, vast moving sheets of ice destroyed nearly all life and transformed the contours of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in Northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the summits, but the cold they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling stick ___ and deeply carved peaks.

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of this ice age legacy. The Peregrine Falcon comes to the Mournes to nest. Remote rock faces and inaccessible edges are the safest place to raise their chicks. And the land around provides good hunting for the adults. All good reasons why there’re more Peregrines here than anywhere else in Ireland. But even Peregrines couldn’t have lived here until the ice age ended, around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they stick their fame to Ireland or plants isn’t clear. But since then their fortunes like everything else here have changed with the times. Today they’re wide spread throughout the country. But less than 40 years ago, Peregrines hit an all-time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just to 27 successful nesting pairs, bringing them ___ close to extinction. Only when the chemicals were banned did the Peregrines recovery begin. It’s been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape they are inherited from the ice.

 

Ireland’s mountains lies scattered around her edge, encircling a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fens, and ___. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland’s most secret mountain, Croke Patric. On this summit, Ireland’s patron saint has believed to a fasting for 40 days and nights. And today more than 1500 years later, the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year on week Sunday, the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St. Patrick footsteps. As the pilgrims make their steep descent, the view before them is another with its feet in the ice age, Clew Bay. Well-backed islands are a testimony to the power of glaciers. Stones and soil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini-hills called Drummans. Then when the ice retreated and sea level rose, these glacier relics were partly submerged, creating a drowned landscape.

 

In this water world, even the sheep are shepherded by boat, in traditional currachs powered by modern outboard motors. The popular believe that there are 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the north Atlantic and their rocky shorelines are a sanctuary for common seals.

 

Clew Bay is one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen in time. Whole communities once carved a living from these islands, animals grazed, and homesteads grew up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing time has made this kind of life on economic today. Only seven of the islands are still inhabited.

 

There are ghosts of passed lives all along this stretch of coast. Rock-feet castle was one of many belonging to Grace O’Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates, who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideaways for the pirate galleys, the plundered passing ships. It’s hard to imagine such a turbulent past. All is likely to disturb these waters today are otters hunting for food.

1

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You must immerse yourself in an unfamiliar world in order to truly understand your own~~~
立即获取| 免费注册领取外教体验课一节

HW 第一次来视听哈~

(Music)

 


This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea. Held once a year on Beach near Dublin, it reflects Irland's century's old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark on what time and nature have already made just as he helped to mold the Irish landscape, animals and plants. And before humans, older, more profound horses were at work. This ancient land might seem timeless but change lies at its very heart--Irland has varies / still. Ireland's hills and mountains are formed from her oldest, hardest rocks, are part of the legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which this island is built. Of the landscapes we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere, Ireland has been sculpted in someway by one of the greatest forces of nature -- ice.

 


For almost two million years Ireland, like the rest of Europe, was locked in the grip of the Ice Age. Glaciers, fast moving sheets of ice, just drawn nearly all life and transformed the / of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in Northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the sermons, but the cold they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling(砍 凿)steep ravines(沟壑, 峡谷)and deeply carved peeks.

 

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of this Ice Age legacy -- The pilgrim / comes to the Mournes to nest. Remote rock faces and inaccessible ledges are the safest place to raise their chicks and the land around provides good hunting for the adults. All good reasons why there are more pilgrims here than any where else in Ireland. But even pilgrims couldn't have lived here until the Ice Age ended around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they sticked their claim to Ireland's uplands isn't clear, but since then their fortunes, like everything else here have changed with the times. Today they are widespread throughout the country, but less than 40 years ago Pilgrims is an old time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just 27 successful nesting pairs bringing them paralysely close to extinction. Only when the chemicals were banned did the Pilgrims'recovery began. It's been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape and / from the ice.

 

 

Ireland's mountains lies scattered around her edge and circling a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fans and box. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland's most secret mountain -- St. Patricks. On its summit, Ireland's Patron Saint is believed to have fasted (禁食)for 40 days and nights and today, more than 1500 years later the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year on "Reek Sunday", the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St. Patricks' footsteps. As the pilgrims make their steep secent, the view before them is another with its fidget Ice Age -- Clew Bay. Well backed islands are a testimony to the power of glaciers. Stones and oil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini hills, called /. Then when the ice retreated and sea levels rose, these glacier relics were partially submerged creating a drowned landscape. In this water world, even the sheep were chaperoned by boat in traditional curricles powered by modern out board motors. The popular belive is that there are 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the North Atlantic and their rocky shore lines are a sanctuary for common seals.Two days one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen and time, whole communities want calves to living from these islands. Animals graced and / grow up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing times have made this kind of life uneconomic today. Only seven of the islands are still inhabited.

 


There are ghosts of past lives all along this stretch of coast. Rockfleet Castle was one of many belonging to Clan O'Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideways for the pirate galeas(两桅小船) that plundered passing ships. It's hard to imagine such / past. All it's likely to disturb these waters today are / hunting for food.

 

[ Last edited by 希崽天道酬勤 at 2009-2-5 11:25 ]
1

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  • fionainnicemood

实现无障碍英语沟通

so beautiful!!! but i can't write down

 

请勿灌水 谢谢配合 ——fiona

 

[ Last edited by fionainnicemood at 2009-2-6 17:59 ]
口译专员推荐—>口译训练软件IPTAM口译通

on may_pb  一楼好强啊!!!

 

This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea. Held once a year on Laytown Beach near Dublin, it reflects Ireland’s centuries-old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark on what time and nature have already made, justly to help to mold the Irish landscape, animals, and plants.

 

And before humans, older, more profound forces were at work. This ancient land  might seem timeless but change lies at its very heart. Ireland has weariest to its still. Ireland’s hills and mountains are formed from her oldest, hardest rocks, their part of the legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which this island is built. But the landscapes we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere Ireland has been sculpted in some way by one of the greatest forces of nature, ice. For almost two million years, Ireland like the rest of Europe was locked in the grape of ice age. Glaciers, vast moving sheets of ice destroyed nearly all life and transformed the contours of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in Northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the summits, but the cold they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling stick reins and deeply carved peaks.

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of this ice age legacy. The Peregrine Falcon comes to the Mournes to nest. Remote rock faces an inaccessible edges are the safest place to raise their chicks. And the land around provides good hunting for the adults. All good reasons why there’re more Peregrines here than anywhere else in Ireland. But even Peregrines couldn’t have lived here until the ice age ended, around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they stick their fame to Ireland or plants isn’t clear. But since then their fortunes like everything else here have changed with the times. Today they’re wide spread throughout the country. But less than 40 years ago, Peregrines hit an all-time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just // 27 successful nesting pairs, bringing them parallelsly close to extinction. Only when the chemicals were banned did the Peregrines recovery begin. It’s been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape they are inherited from the ice.

 

Ireland’s mountains lies scattered around her edge, encircling a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fens, and _bulks__. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland’s most secret mountain, Croke Patric. On this summit, Ireland’s patron saint has believed to a fasting for 40 days and nights. And today more than 1500 years later, the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year on week Sunday, the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St. Patrick footsteps. As the pilgrims make their steep descent, the view before them is another with its feet in the ice age, Clew Bay. Well-backed islands are a testimony to the power of glaciers. Stones and soil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini-hills called Drummans. Then when the ice retreated and sea levels rose, these glacier relics were partly submerged, creating a drowned landscape.

 

In this water world, even the sheep are shepherded by boat, in traditional currachs powered by modern outboard motors. The popular believe that there are 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the north Atlantic and their rocky shorelines are a sanctuary for common seals.

 

Clew Bay is one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen in time. Whole communities once carved a living from these islands, animals grazed, and homesteads grew up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing time has made this kind of life an economic today. Only seven of the islands are still inhabited.

 

There are ghosts of past lives all along this stretch of coast. Rock-feet castle was one of many belonging to Grace O’Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates, who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideaways for the pirate galleys, the plundered passing ships. It’s hard to imagine such a turbulent past. All is likely to disturb these waters today are otters hunting for food.

1

评分次数

Home work 音乐好听,内容很充实,听起来好难....

 

This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea. Held once a year on Laytown Beach near Dublin. It reflects Ireland's centuries old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark what time and nature have already made, justly help to mold of the Irish landscape, animals and plants.

 

And before humans, older, more profound forces were worked. This ancient land might have seen timeless but change lies it very heart. Ireland has weariest to its still. Ireland's hills and mountains are formed from oldest, hardest rocks, a part of legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which Ireland is built. But the landscape we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere Ireland has been sculpted in the some way by one of the greatest forces of nature, ice. From almost two million years, Ireland like the rest of Europe was locked in the grape of the ice age. Glaciers, vast moving sheet of ice destroyed nearly all lives and transformed the contours of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the summits, but the cold they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling steep ravines and deeply carved peeks.

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of its ice age legacy. The peregrine falcon comes to the Mournes to nest. Remove rock faces and inaccessible edges are the safest place to raise their chicks. And the land around provides good hunting for the adults. All good reasons why there're more peregrines here than anywhere else in Ireland. But even peregrines couldn't lived here until ice age ended, around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they stick their fame to Ireland or plants isn't clear. But since then their fortunes like everything else here have changed with times. Today they 're wide apread through out the country. But less than forty years ago, peregrines hit an all time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just 27 succesful nesting pairs, bringing them pairasly close to extiction. Only when chemicals were banned did the pilgrims'recovery began. It's been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape and inherited from the ice.

 

Ireland's mountains lies scattered around the edge, encircing a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fens and bulks. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland's most secret mountains, Croke Prtric. On this summits, Ireland's patron saint has believed to a fasting for a forty days and nights. And today more than 1500 years later, the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year around week Sunday, the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St.Patrick footsteps. As the Pilgrims make their steep descent, the view before them is another with its feet in the ice age, Clew Bay. Well backed islands are testimony to the power graciers. Stones and soil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini hills call Drummans. Then when the ice retreated and see levels rose, these glacier relics were partly submerged, creating a drowned landscape.

 

In this water world, even the sheep are shepherded by boat, in traditional currachs power by modern outboard motors. The popular believe that 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the north Atlantic and their rocky shorelines are sanctuary for common seals.

 

Clew Bay is one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen in time. Whole communities once carved a living from these islands, animals grazed, and homesteads grew up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing time has made this kind of life an economic today. Only seven of these islands are still inhabited.

 

There are ghosted of past lives all along this stretch of coast. Rock feet castle was one of many belonging to Grace O'Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates, who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideways for the pirates galleys, the plundered passing ships. It's hard to imagine such a turbulent past. All is likely to disturb this waters today are otters hunting for food.

 

 

[ 本帖最后由 freddy321 于 2009-2-5 14:21 编辑 ]
1

评分次数

  • fionainnicemood

on 源源1022

Beautiful picture and music, i like it very much but why the Chinese name is 冰岛万象,I guess someone has mistaken Ireland for Iceland

 

This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea. Held once a year on Laytown Beach near Dublin, it reflects Ireland’s centuries-old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark on what time and nature have already made, just as he helped to mold the Irish landscape, animals, and plants.

 

And before humans, older, more profound forces were at work. This ancient land might seem timeless but change lies at its very heart. Ireland has rarely stood still. Ireland’s hills and mountains are formed from her oldest, hardest rocks. They’re part of the legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which this island is built.

 

But the landscapes we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere Ireland has been sculpted in some way by one of the greatest forces of nature, ice. For almost two million years, Ireland like the rest of Europe was locked in the grip of the ice age. Glaciers, vast moving sheets of ice destroyed nearly all life and transformed the contours of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in Northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the summits, but the cold they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling steep ravines and deeply carved peaks.

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of this ice age legacy-- the Peregrine Falcon comes to the Mournes to nest. Remote rock faces and inaccessible edges are the safest place to raise their chicks. And the land around provides good hunting for the adults, all good reasons why there’re more Peregrines here than anywhere else in Ireland. But even Peregrines couldn’t have lived here until the ice age ended, around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they staked their claim to Ireland uplands isn’t clear. But since then their fortunes like everything else here have changed with the times. Today they’re wide spread throughout the country. But less than 40 years ago, Peregrines hit an all-time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just 27 successful nesting pairs, bringing them paralysedly close to extinction. Only when the chemicals were banned did the Peregrines recovery begin. It’s been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape they / inherited from the ice.

 

Ireland’s mountains lies scattered around her edge, encircling a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fens, and barks. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland’s most sacred mountain, Croagh Patrick. On this summit, Ireland’s patron saint is believed to have fasted for 40 days and nights. And today more than 1500 years later, the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year on Reek Sunday, the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St. Patrick’s footsteps. As the pilgrims make their steep descent, the view before them is another with its feet in the ice age, Clew Bay.

 

Well-backed islands are a testimony to the power of glaciers. Stones and soil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini-hills called Drummans. Then when the ice retreated and sea levels arose, these glacial relics were partly submerged, creating a drowned landscape.

 

In this water world, even the sheep are shepherded by boat, in traditional currachs powered by modern outboard motors. The popular belief is that there are 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the north Atlantic and their rocky shorelines are a sanctuary for common seals.

 

Clew Bay is one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen in time. Whole communities once carved a living from these islands, animals grazed, and homesteads grew up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing time has made this kind of life uneconomic today. Only seven of the islands are still inhabited.

 

There are ghosts of past lives all along this stretch of coast. Rockfleet Castle was one of many belonging to Grace O’Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates, who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideaways for the pirate galleys, the plundered passing ships. It’s hard to imagine such a turbulent past. All is likely to disturb these waters today are otters hunting for food.

 

 

2

评分次数

实现无障碍英语沟通

On Zkdaisy

 

This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea. Held once a year on Laytown Beach near Dublin, it reflects Ireland’s centuries-old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark on what time and nature have already made, just as he helped to mold the Irish landscape, animals, and plants.

 

And before humans, older, more profound forces were at work. This ancient land might seem timeless but change lies at its very heart. Ireland has rarely stood still. Ireland’s hills and mountains are formed from her oldest, hardest rocks. They’re part of the legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which this island is built.

 

But the landscapes we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere Ireland has been sculpted in some way by one of the greatest forces of nature, ice. For almost two million years, Ireland like the rest of Europe was locked in the grip of the ice age. Glaciers, vast moving sheets of ice destroyed nearly all life and transformed the contours of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in Northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the summits, but the cold they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling steep ravines and deeply carved peaks.

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of this ice age legacy-- the Peregrine Falcon comes to the Mournes to nest. Remote rock faces and inaccessible edges are the safest place to raise their chicks. And the land around provides good hunting for the adults, all good reasons why there’re more Peregrines here than anywhere else in Ireland. But even Peregrines couldn’t have lived here until the ice age ended, around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they staked their claim to Ireland uplands isn’t clear. But since then their fortunes like everything else here have changed with the times. Today they’re wide spread throughout the country. But less than 40 years ago, Peregrines hit an all-time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just 27 successful nesting pairs, bringing them paralyzed close to extinction. Only when the chemicals were banned did the Peregrines recovery begin. It’s been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape they(不知道有没有) inherited from the ice.

 

Ireland’s mountains lies scattered around her edge, encircling a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fens, and barks. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland’s most sacred mountain, Croagh Patrick. On this summit, Ireland’s patron saint is believed to have fasted for 40 days and nights. And today more than 1500 years later, the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year on Reek Sunday, the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St. Patrick’s footsteps. As the pilgrims make their steep descent, the view before them is another with its feet in the ice age, Clew Bay.

 

Well-backed islands are a testimony to the power of glaciers. Stones and soil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini-hills called Drummans. Then when the ice retreated and sea levels arose, these glacial relics were partly submerged, creating a drowned landscape.

 

In this water world, even the sheep are shepherded by boat, in traditional currachs powered by modern outboard motors. The popular belief is that there are 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the north Atlantic and their rocky shorelines are a sanctuary for common seals.

 

Clew Bay is one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen in time. Whole communities once carved a living from these islands, animals grazed, and homesteads grew up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing time has made this kind of life uneconomic today. Only seven of the islands are still inhabited.

 

There are ghosts of past lives all along this stretch of coast. Rockfleet Castle was one of many belonging to Grace O’Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates, who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideaways for the pirate galleys, the plundered passing ships. It’s hard to imagine such a turbulent past. All is likely to disturb these waters today are otters hunting for food.

 

楼上的好强啊,我什么时候才能像那样。。。

第一次在这里发帖,以前都不太敢发的。。呵呵

1

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普特听力大课堂

都是偶像啊,我菜鸟

 

请不要灌水 谢谢配合——fiona

[ Last edited by fionainnicemood at 2009-2-6 10:45 ]
好栏目推荐之美国口语俚语

Original posted by zkdaisy at 2009-2-5 15:07 Beautiful picture and music, i like it very much but why the Chinese name is 冰岛万象,I guess someone has mistaken Ireland for Iceland   This is the only horse race in the ...

 

我刚开始也这么觉得~~可是听完以后 发现称爱尔兰是冰岛也是有道理的呀!仔细研究一下内容类~~~版主!!应该写成“冰岛”万象!

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So many advanced English learners here.

 

请勿灌水 下次发现扣贡献值——fiona

[ Last edited by fionainnicemood at 2009-2-6 17:58 ]

i lovn't it

 

 

请勿灌水 下次发现扣贡献值——fiona

[ Last edited by fionainnicemood at 2009-2-9 18:25 ]
每天半小时 轻松提高英语口语

HOMEWORK  (I love that background music)

This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea.

 

Held once a year on Beach near Dublin, it reflects Ireland’s century's old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark on what time and nature have already made just as he helped to mold the Irish landscape, animals and plants.

 

And before humans, older, more profound horses were at work. This ancient land might seem timeless but changed lies at its very heart--Ireland has various still. Ireland's hills and mountains are formed from her oldest, hardest rocks, are part of the legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which this island is built. Of the landscapes we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere, Ireland has been sculpted in someway by one of the greatest forces of nature -- ice.


For almost two million years Ireland-like the rest of Europe-was locked in the grip of the Ice Age. Glaciers, fast moving sheets of ice, just drawn nearly all life and transformed the contours of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in Northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the sermons, but the cold they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling steep ravine and deeply carved peeks.

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of this Ice Age legacy -- The pilgrim falcon comes to the Mournes to nest. Remote rock faces and inaccessible ledges are the safest place to raise their chicks and the land around provides good hunting for the adults. All good reasons why there are more pilgrims here than any where else in Ireland.

 

But even pilgrims couldn't have lived here until the Ice Age ended around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they stick their claim to Ireland's uplands isn't clear, but since then their fortunes, like everything else here have changed with the times. Today they are widespread throughout the country, but less than 40 years ago Pilgrims is an old time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just 27 successful nesting pairs bringing them paralyze close to extinction. Only when the chemicals were banned did the Pilgrims’ recovery began. It's been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape and * from the ice.

 

Ireland's mountains lie scattered around her edge and circling a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fans and box. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland's most secret mountain -- St. Patricks. On its summit, Ireland's Patron Saint is believed to have fasted for 40 days and nights and today, more than 1500 years later the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year on "Reek Sunday", the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St. Patrick’s footsteps. As the pilgrims make their steep scent, the view before them is another with its fidget Ice Age -- Clew Bay. Well backed islands are a testimony to the power of glaciers. Stones and oil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini hills, called Drumems. Then when the ice retreated and sea levels rose, these glacier relics were partially submerged creating a drowned landscape. In this water world, even the sheep were chaperoned by boat in traditional curricles powered by modern out board motors. The popular belief is that there are 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the North Atlantic and their rocky shore lines are a sanctuary for common seals. Two days one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen and time, whole communities want calves to living from these islands. Animals graced and homesteads grow up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing times have made this kind of life uneconomic today. Only seven of the islands are still inhabited.


There are ghosts of past lives all along this stretch of coast. Rock fleet Castle was one of many belonging to Clan O'Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideaways for the pirate galleass that plundered passing ships. It's hard to imagine such a turbulent past. All it's likely to disturb these waters today are utters hunting for food.

 

1

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With or without the truth.

on vidda

This is the only horse race in the world to be run at the edge of the sea. Held once a year on Laytown Beach near Dublin, it reflects Ireland’s centuries-old love affair with the horse. Man has bred these horses for speed and endurance. He has left his own mark on what time and nature have already made, just as he helped to mold the Irish landscape, animals, and plants.

 

And before humans, older, more profound forces were at work. This ancient land might seem timeless but change lies at its very heart. Ireland has rarely stood still. Ireland’s hills and mountains are formed from her oldest, hardest rocks. They’re part of the legacy of her geological past, the foundation on which this island is built.

 

But the landscapes we see today have more recent origins. Everywhere Ireland has been sculpted in some way by one of the greatest forces of nature, ice. For almost two million years, Ireland, like the rest of Europe was locked in the grip of the ice age. Glaciers, vast moving sheets of ice destroyed nearly all life and transformed the contours of the land. No part of Ireland completely escaped their impact. In the mountains of Mourne in Northern Ireland, the glaciers never quite reach the summits, but the code they carried with them did. Frost actions split and shattered the rock faces, chiseling steep ravines and deeply carved peaks.

 

One bird of the mountains has made the most of this ice age legacy-- the Peregrine Falcon comes to the Mournes to nest. Remote rock faces and inaccessible ledges(narrow horizontal shelf coming out from a wall, cliff, etc 水平的窄长架状突出物; 壁架; 岩石架)  are the safest place to raise their chicks. And the land around provides good hunting for the adults-- all good reasons why there’re more Peregrines here than anywhere else in Ireland. But even Peregrines couldn’t have lived here until the ice age ended, around 13,000 years ago. Exactly when they staked their claim to Ireland uplands isn’t clear. But since then their fortunes like everything else here have changed with the times. Today they’re wide spread throughout the country. But less than 40 years ago, Peregrines hit an all-time low. Poisoned by insecticides designed to protect seeds and crops, their numbers died to just 27 successful nesting pairs, bringing them paralyzedly close to extinction. Only when the chemicals were banned did the Peregrines recovery begin. It’s been a slow process, but they are now thriving and reclaiming the mountain landscape they inherited from the ice.

 

Ireland’s mountains lie scattered around her edge, encircling a watery landscape of rivers, streams, lakes, fens, and barks. On her west coast in County Mayo stands Ireland’s most sacred mountain, Croagh Patrick. On this summit, Ireland’s patron saint is believed to have fasted for 40 days and nights. And today more than 1500 years later, the mountain remains a place of pilgrimage. Every year on Reek Sunday, the last Sunday in July, more than 25,000 people follow in St. Patrick’s footsteps. As the pilgrims make their steep descent, the view before them is another with its feet in the ice age, Clew Bay.

 

Well-backed islands are a testimony to the power of glaciers. Stones and soil were trapped beneath their massive weight and molded into mini-hills called Drummans. Then when the ice retreated and sea levels rose, these glacial relics were partly submerged, creating a drowned landscape.

 

In this water world, even the sheep are shepherded by boat, in traditional currachs powered by modern outboard motors. The popular belief is that there are 365 islands in Clew Bay, one for each day of the year. They are sheltered from the more extreme conditions of the North Atlantic and their rocky shorelines are a sanctuary for common seals.

 

Clew Bay is one of those corners of Ireland that feels frozen in time. Whole communities once carved a living from these islands, animals grazed, and homesteads grew up around small sheltered bays. But famine drove many away and changing time has made this kind of life uneconomic today. Only seven of the islands are still inhabited.

 

There are ghosts of past lives all along this stretch of coast. Rockfleet Castle was one of many belonging to Grace O’Malley, Queen of the Clew Bay pirates, who ruled these waters in the 16th century. The network of tiny isles and bays provided ideal hideaways for the pirate galleys, the plundered passing ships. It’s hard to imagine such a turbulent past. All that's likely to disturb these waters today are otters hunting for food.

[ Last edited by fionainnicemood at 2009-2-10 23:58 ]
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