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[BBC] 【整理】BBC 2010-04-21

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BBC news with Sue Montgomery

Britain reopening all its airports with immediate effect following six days in which flights 。。。are largely grounded by the plume of volcanic dust that is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British Aviation Regulator Dame Deirdre Hutton? also announced new standards governing flighting in hazardous conditions. She said the rules had been drawn up in consultation with the aircraft manufacturers and took account of the results of the recent test flights. "The new guidance allows phased reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no-flight zones where concentration of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flights to take place, but that will be very much smaller than the present restrictions." Throughout the day, some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdam and Frankfurt, but flight bans remain in place over large sweeps of the continent. Some news just in. The first flight has landed at Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace later on Tuesday.
The International Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for any bailouts that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance ministers from the Group of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports.
The IMF is proposing a levy what it calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost of taxpayers’ any future government support for the sector. It will apply to all financial intuitions. Overtime, the IMF suggested it could be refined to reflect the riskfulness of each firm’s activities. And if government wants to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put additional taxes on profits and employees’ pay.  The report also says there should be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise there will be an incentive for them to risks in the expectation that they are not allowed to fail.
Iraqi military says it’s killed another leading member of Al-Quaeda. It comes the day after the government said its troops had killed the two most-wanted Al-Quaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is Jim Muir.
According to Iraqi military officials Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosoul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of Al-Quaeda’s operations there, and also in Kurkuk and Salahuddin provinces. One report said the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured Al-Quaeda official as the information that led to the raid which killed the two top Al-Quaeda leaders early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now have Al-Quaeda leadership on the run.
BBC News
Fresh allegations have surfaced the rigging in Sudan’s elections last week. A group of local observers released a video which reportedly shows men dressed in orange uniform of election officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However a Sudanese elections commission official denied there were any ballot-stuffing or rigging.
The Supreme Court in United States has ruled that a law that makes it a crime to sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judges who support the ruling said that law was too vague and therefore infringes the guarantee of free speech in the US Constitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.
The Supreme Court ruled the law of banning animal cruelty video was overbroad and invalid under the first amendment. A man who has been sentenced to 3 years in prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs or other animals appealed against his sentence. And the court found that although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state, the depiction of cruelty shouldn't itself be illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what is known as crush videos. Fetishes take films of women in high heels slowly crushing small animals to death.
Some 3000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to a better pay in working conditions. The workers at an aluminum? factory are also demanding the sacking of the official trade union representative whom they accused of working for management.
A court in Britain has heard a dead body lay undiscovered for nearly 10 years in a tile block flat in the western city of Bristol despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about a terrible stench. The court heard that the man have been staying with a friend who has suddenly died. Council workers have visited the flat and put the smell down to an overflowing drain. Bristol city’s council has apologized for failing to act earlier.
BBC news
1

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  • nolose

本帖最后由 nolose 于 2010-4-21 14:33 编辑

on neverwanna
Homework

BBC News with Sue Montgamory.

Britain is reopening all its airports with image defect, following 6 days in which flights per round largely grounded by the plume of volcanic dust that is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British Aviation Regulator, Dame Deirdre Hutton also announced new standards governing flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rules had been drawn up in consultation with aircraft manufacturers and took account of the results of recent test flights.

The new guidance allows to face reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no-fly-zones where concentration of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flights to take place. But that would be very much smaller than the present restrictions.

Through out the day, some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdan and Frankfurt. But flight bans remains in place over large sweeps of the continent. Some news just in, the first flight has landed at Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

The Internationl Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for any bailouts that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance ministers from the group of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports.

The IMF is proposing a levy, what it calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost taxpayers' of any future government support for the sector. It would apply to all financial insitutions. Over time the IMF' suggested could be refined to reflect the riskiness of each firm's activities. And if the government wants to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profits and then employees' pay. The reporter also says that there should be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise, there would be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military says it's killed another leading member of Al-Quaeda. It comes the day after the government said its troops had killed the two most wanted Al-Quaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is Jim Muir.

According to Iraqi military officials, Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of Al-Quaeda's operations there, and also in Kurkuk and Salahuddin provinces. One report said the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured Al-Quaeda offical as the information that led to the raid which killed the two top Al-Quaeda leaders in Iraq early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now have the Al-Quaeda leadership on the run.

BBC News

Fresh allegations have surfaced of rigging Sudan's elections last week. A group of local observers released a video which reportedly shows men dressed in the orange uniform of election officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However, a Sudanese election commission offical denied there being any ballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in the United States has ruled that a law that makes it a crime to sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judgers who supported the ruling said the law was too vague and therefore infinged the guarantee of free speech in the US Constitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled that the law of banning animal cruelty video was overbroad and invalid under the first amendment. A man who has been sentenced to 3 years in prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs or other animals appealed against his sentence. And the court found that although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state, the depiction of cruety shouldn't itself be illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what known as crush videos. / films women in high hills slowly crushing small animals to death.

Some 3000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to better pay and working conditions. The workers at an aluminium factory are also demanding the sacking of the official trade union representative whom they accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that a dead body lay undiscovered for nearly 10 years in a tower block flat in the western city of Bristol, despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about the terrible stench. The court heard that the man had been staying with a friend when he suddenly died. Council workers who visited the flat put the smell down to a overflowing drain. Bristol city Council has apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC News
1

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  • atakan

走完同一条街,回到两个世界
立即获取| 免费注册领取外教体验课一节
本帖最后由 hardyzhou 于 2010-4-21 14:58 编辑

On nolose

BBC News with Sue Montgomery.

Britain is reopening all its airports with image
effect, following six days in which flights were arrived round largely grounded by the plume of volcanic dust that is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British Aviation RegulatorDame Deirdre Hutton also announced new standards governing flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rules had been drawn up in consultation with the
aircraft manufacturers and took account of the results of recent test flights.

The new guidance allows to face reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no-fly-zones where
concentrations
of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flights to take place. But that would be very much smaller than the present restrictions.

Throughout the day, some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdam
and Frankfurt. But flight bans remains in place over large sweeps of the continent. Some news just in, the first flight has landed at Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

The
International Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for
bailouts that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance ministers from the group of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports.

The IMF is proposing a levy, what it calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost taxpayers' of any future government support for the sector. It would apply to all financial
institutions. Over time the IMF suggests it
could be refined to reflect the riskiness of each firm's activities. And if the government wants to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profits and employees' pay. The reporter also says there should be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise, there would be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military says it's killed another leading member of
al-Qaeda.
It comes the day after the government said its troops had killed two most wanted al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is Jim Muir.

According to Iraqi military officials, Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of
al-Qaeda’s operations there, and also in
Kirkuk and Salahuddin provinces. One report said the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured al-Qaeda official as the information that led to the raid which killed the two top al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now have the al-Qaeda leadership on the run.

BBC News

Fresh allegations have surfaced of rigging
in Sudan’s elections last week. A group of local observers released video which reportedly shows men dressed in the orange uniform of election officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However, a Sudanese election commission
official denied there being any ballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in the United States has ruled that a law that makes it
a crime to sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to free speech. The Supreme Court
judges who supported the ruling said the law was too vague and therefore infringed the guarantee of free speech in the US Constitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled the law of banning animal cruelty video was
over broad and invalid under the first amendment. A man who has been sentenced to 3 years in prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs or other animals appealed against his sentence. And the court found although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state, the depiction of
cruelty shouldn't itself be illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what known as crush videos.
Fetishistic film of women in high hills slowly crushing small animals to death.

Some 3000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to better pay and working conditions. The workers at an aluminium factory are also demanding the sacking the official trade union representative whom they accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that a dead body lay undiscovered for nearly 10 years in a tower block flat in the western city of Bristol, despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about the terrible stench. The court heard that the man had been staying with a friend when he suddenly died. Council workers who visited the flat put the smell down to a overflowing drain. Bristol city has apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC News

1

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  • nolose

力尽艰辛,跋山涉水,梦境终成现实,痴梦人终会梦想成真!
实现无障碍英语沟通
HW:
BBC News with Sue Montgomery.

Britain is reopening all its airports with image to effect, following six days in which flights were arrived largely grounded for the plume of volcanic dust that is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British Aviation Regulator Dame Deirdre Hutton also announced new standards governing flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rules had been drawn up in consultation with the aircraft manufactures and took account of the results of recently test flights.

The new guideness allows to face reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no fly zones where concentration of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flights to take place. But that would be very much smaller than the present restrictions.

Throughout the day, some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris,Amsterdam and Frankfurt, but flight bans remained in place over large sweeps of the continent.

Some news just in. The first flight has landed at Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

The International Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay any bailouts that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance ministers from the group of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports.

The IMF is proposing a levy what it calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost to taxpayers of any future government support for the sector. It would apply to all financial institutions overtime the IMF suggests it could be refined to reflect the riskiness of each firm's activities. And if governments want to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profits and employees' pay. The report also says there should be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise, there would be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military says it's killed another leading member of al-Qaeda. It comes the day after the government said its troops had killed the two most wanted al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is Jim Muir.According to Iraqi military officials, Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of al-Qaeda's operations there and also in Kirkuk and ... province. One report said that the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured al-Qaeda official as the information that led to the raid which killed the two top al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now have the al-Qaeda leadership underrun.

BBC News.

Fresh allegations have serviced of regein in Sudan's elections last week. A group of local observers released video which reportedly shows men dressed in the orange uniform of the election officials stuffing voting slippers into a ballot box. However, a Sudanese election's commission official denied there have been any ballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in the United States has ruled that a law that makes it crime to sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judgers who support the ruling said the law was too vague and therefore in French, the guarantee of free speech in the US Constitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled that the law of banning animal cruelty videos was over abroad and invalidate onto the first amendment. A man who had been sentenced to three years in prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs and other animals appealed against his sentence. And the court found that although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state, the depiction of joting showed itself the illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what known as crush videos.  The crushing films of women in high-heeleds slowly crushing small animals to death.

Some 3,000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to about paying working conditions. The workers at an factory are also demanding the sacking the official trade union representative whom they accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that a dead body lay undiscovered for nearly ten years in a tower bloc flat in the western city of Bristol despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about a terrible stengch. The court heard that the man had been staying with a friend when he suddenly died. Council workers have visited the flat, put the smell down to an overflowing drain. Bristol's City Council has apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC News.
1

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  • nolose

口译专员推荐—>口译训练软件IPTAM口译通
我也要把所有内容写出来~
homework

BBC news with SG

Britain is reopening all its airports with immediate effect following six days in which flights were largely ground, for the plume of a volcanic dust that is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British Aviation Regulator DH also announced new standards governing flying in hazardous conditions. She says the rules have been drawn up in consultation with the aircraft manufacturers and took account of the results of recent test flies.

The new guidance allows it face to reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no-fly zones where concentration of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flights to take place. But that will be very much smaller than the present restrictions.

Throughout the day, some flights resumed to the main international airports in Pairs, Amsterdam and Frankfort. But flight bans remains in place over large swathe of the continent. Some news just in the first flight has landed at Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

The International Monetary Fund is calling for a new tax to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for any bailout that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance ministers from the groups of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent AW reports.

The IMF is proposing a levy what it calls a financial stability contribution, to cover the cost of tax payers that any future governments support for the sector. It will apply to all financial institutions. Over the time, the IMF suggested it could be refined to affect the riskiness of each firm's activities. And if governments want to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profit and on employee's pay. The report also says there should be a legal framework for sorting out trouble firms. Otherwise they will be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military says it's killed another leading member of Al-Qaeda. It comes a day after the government said its troops had killed the two most wanted Al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is JM.

According to Iraqi military officials, Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near MS in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of Al-Qaeda's operations there and also in Kirkuk and Salahuddin provinces. One report says the intelligence for the attack come from the same captured Al-Qaeda official as the information that led to the raid which killed the two top Al-Qaeda leaders early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now no have the Al-Qaeda leadership on the run.

BBC news.

Fresh allegations have surfaced of rigging in Sudan's elections last week. A group of local observers released a video which purportedly shows men dressed in the orange uniform of the election officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However A Sudanese elections commission official denied there'd been any ballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in the United States has ruled that a law that makes it a crime to sell video of animal being tortured or killed violate the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judgers who support the ruling said the law was too weak and therefore infringe the guarantee of free speech in the US constitution. MM is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled that the law on banning animal ** videos was over broad and invalid under the first amendment. A man has been sentenced to three years in prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs and other animals appealed against his sentence. And the court found that although dog fighting is out law in every American state, the depiction of cruelty should itself be illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what were known as crush videos that **  films of women in high heel slowly crushing small animals to death.

Some 3000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to better pay and working conditions. The workers at AM factory are also demanding the sacking of the official trade union representative, whom they accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that a dead body lay undiscovered for nearly 10 years in a tower block flat in the western city of BT, despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about a terrible stench. The court heard that the man had been staying with a friend when he suddenly died. Council workers who visited the flat put the smell down to an over flowing drain. Bristol city council has apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC news.
1

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  • nolose

貌似好难。。。。
实现无障碍英语沟通
有一个埃及的工厂大家都没写出来哦,应该是at an aluminium factory,在一个铝厂。
普特听力大课堂
HW
BBC NEWS with Sue Montgomery

Britain is reopening all its airports with image to effect, following six days in which flights arrived largely grounded by the plume volcanic dust that is blown across Europe from Iceland, a spokeswoman for the British Aviation Regulator Dame Deirdre Hutton also announced new standard governing flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rule has been drawn up in consultation with the aircraft manufactures and took account of the results of recent test flights.

The new guidance allows to face reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There would continue to be some no-flight zones where concentrations of ash levels are unsafe for flights to take place. But that would be very much smaller than the present restrictions.

Throughout the days some flights resumed that the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdam and Frankfurt but flight bans remains in place over large sweats of the continent. Some new suggesting the first flight has landed in Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace late on Tuesday.

International Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for any bailouts that might be needed for the future. The proposals are contained in the paper prepared for finance ministers from the group of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports.

The IMF are proposing a levy what it calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost of taxpayers of any future government support for the sector. It would apply to all financial institutions, overtime the IMF suggested it could be refined to reflect the riskiness of each firm activities. And if government want to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profits and employee pay. Report also says there should be a legal framework for sorting troubled firms. Otherwise, there would be incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military said it has killed another leading member of Al-Qaeda, it comes the day after the government said its troops had killed two most wanted Al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is Jim Muir.

According to a Iraqi military official, Ahmed al-Obeidi were killed in an early morning attack by U.S and Iraq forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of Al-Qaeda’s operation there and also in Kirkuk and Salahuddin province. One reports said that the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured Al-Qaeda official as the information that led to the raid of which killed the two top Al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now have the Al-Qaeda leadership on the round.

BBC news

Fresh allegations have servers to regain in Sudan’s elections last week. A group of local observers released a video which reportedly shows man dressed the orange uniform with election officials stuffing voting slippers into a ballot box. However, the Sudanese election commission official denied there been any ballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in U.S has ruled that a law makes it a crime to sell videos about animals been tortured or killed violate the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judges who support the ruling said the law was too vague and therefore in French the government of free speech in the US constitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled the law banning animal cruelty video was over abroad and invalidate onto the first amendment, a man who has been sentenced 3 years in prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs and other animals appears to against his sentence. And the court found that although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state, the depiction of jotting showed itself to be illegal. The law had originally been introduced to do with what known as crush videos. Fetish films of women in high-heels slowly crush small animals to death.

Some 3000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave the factory until management agrees to in working conditions. The workers at the union of the factory are also demanding the sacking of the official trade union representative, whom they accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that the dead body lay undiscovered for nearly ten years. In a towel bloc in the western city of Bristol. Despite neighbor who repeatedly complaining about terrible stench. The court heard that the man had been staying with his friend when he suddenly died. Council workers have visited the flat put the smell down to the over flowing drain. Bristol city council has apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC NEWS
1

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  • nolose

好栏目推荐之美国口语俚语
本帖最后由 nolose 于 2010-4-23 17:57 编辑

改错认了
Britain is reopening all its airports with image to effect, following six days in which flights were arrived largely grounded for the plume of volcanic dust that is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British Aviation Regulator Dame Deirdre Hutton also announced new standards governing flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rules had been drawn up in consultation with the aircraft manufactures and took account of the results of recently test flights.

The new guideness allows to face reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no fly zones where concentration of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flights to take place. But that would be very much smaller than the present restrictions.

Throughout the day, some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris,Amsterdam and Frankfurt, but flight bans remained in place over large sweeps of the continent.

Some news just in. The first flight has landed at Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

The International Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay any bailouts that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance minters from the group of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports.

The IMF is proposing a levy what it calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost to taxpayers of any future government support for the sector. It would apply to all financial institutions overtime the IMF suggests it could be refined to reflect the riskiness of each firm's activities. And if governments want to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profits and employees' pay. The report also says there should be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise, there would be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military says it's killed another leading member of al-Qaeda. It comes the day after the government said its troops had killed the two most wanted al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is Jim Muir.

According to Iraqi military officials, Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of al-Qaeda's operations there and also in Kirkuk and Salahuddin province. One report said that the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured al-Qaeda official as the information that led to the raid which killed the two top al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now have the al-Qaeda leadership underrun.

BBC News.

Fresh allegations have serviced of regain in Sudan's elections last week. A group of local observers released video which reportedly shows men dressed in the orange uniform of the election officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However, a Sudanese election's commission official denied there have been any ballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in the United States has ruled that a law that makes it crime to sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judgers who support the ruling said the law was too vague and therefore in French, the guarantee of free speech in the US Constitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled that the law of banning animal cruelty videos was over abroad and invalidate onto the first amendment. A man who had been sentenced to three years in prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs and other animals appealed against his sentence. And the court found that although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state, the depiction of cruelty showed itself the illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what known as crush videos. That ... films of women in high-heeleds slowly crushing small animals to death.

Some 3,000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to about paying working conditions. The workers at an ... factory are also demanding the sacking the official trade union representative whom they accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that a dead body lay undiscovered for nearly ten years in a tower bloc flat in the western city of Bristol despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about a terrible stench. The court heard that the man had been staying with a friend when he suddenly died. Council workers have visited the flat, put the smell down to an overflowing drain. Bristol's City Council has apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC News
1

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  • nolose

脑子不长锈就好。
HW
BBC News with Sue Montgamory
Britain is reopening all its airports with image to fight following 6 days in which flights per round largely grounded by the plume of volcanic dust that is blown across much of the Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British aviation regulator Dame Deirdre Hutton also announced new standards governing fly in hazardous conditions. She said the rules have been drawn up in consultation with the aircraft manufacturers and took account of the results of recent test flights.
The new guidance allows us to face new introduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no flight zones where concentrations of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flight to take place. But that would be very much smaller than the present restrictions.

Throughout the days some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdam and Frankfurt. But flight bans remained in place over large swice of the continent. Some news just in the first flight has landed at Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

The International monetary fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for any bailouts that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance ministers from a group of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Worker reports.
The IMF is proposing a levy what it calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost tax past of any future government’s support for the sector. It would apply to all financial institutions. Over time the IMF suggested could be refined to reflect the riskiness of each firm’s activities. And if governments want to raise more money, the IMF suggested they put an additional tax on profits and employees’ pay. The report also says that it should be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise there would be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military says it has killed another leading member of al-Qaeda. It comes the day after the government said its troops had killed the two most wanted al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is Jim Muir.
According to Iraqi military officials Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an early morning attack by the US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of al-Qaeda’s operations there and also in Kirkuk and Salahuddin province. One report said the intelligence for the attack came from the same capture of al-Qaeda official as the information that led to the raid which killed the two top al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders have convinced that they now have the al-Qaeda leadership on the run.

BBC news

Fresh allegations have surfaced of rigging in Sudan’s election last week. A group of local observers released a video which reportedly shows a man dressed in an orange uniform of election officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However, a Sudanese election commission official denied there being any ballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in the United States has ruled that a law that makes it a crime to sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judges who support the ruling said the law was too vague and therefore infringed the guarantee of free speech in the US constitution. Mark Mardel is in Washington.
The Supreme Court ruled the law of banning animal cruelty videos was over broad and invalid under the first amendment. A man who has been sentenced to 3 years in prison for producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs or other animals. Appealed against his sentence and the court found although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state, the depictions of cruelty shouldn’t itself be illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what is known as crush videos. Fetishes film of women in high heels slowly crushing small animals to death.

Some 3,000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to a better pay in working conditions. The workers at
aluminum
factory are also demanding the sucking of the official trade union representative whom is accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that a died body lay undiscovered for nearly 10 years in a tower block flat in the western city of Bristol despite neighbors  repeatedly complaining about the terrible stench. The court heard that the man have been staying with a friend who has suddenly died. Council workers have visited the flat put the smell down to an overflowing drain. Bristol city’s council has apologized for failing to act earlier.
BBC news.

Glossary:
tower block摩天大楼/塔式大楼
fetish 恋物/特殊癖好/迷信
pit bulls=Notch Baby 斗牛犬
Mosul northern city of Iraq)摩苏尔
Kirkuk northeastern city of Iraq)基尔库克
Salahuddin 萨拉丁/丁省
Frankfurt 法兰克福
Heathrow airport 希斯罗机场
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HW
BBC News with Sue Montgomery.
Britain is reopening all its airports with image to effect following six days in which flights / largely grounded, but the plume volcanic dust that is blown across much of the Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman from the British aviation regulator D. also announced new standards governing flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rules have been drown up in consultation with the aircraft manufacturers and took account of the results of recent test flights.
The new guidance allows a phased reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no fly zones where concentrations of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flights took place. But that would be very much smaller than the presently restrictions.
Throughout the days, some flights resume that the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdam and Frankfort but flight bans remains in place over large swifts of the continents.
Some news just in, the first flight has landed / through airport London after a lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flight late on Tuesday.
International Monitory Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for any bailout that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance ministers from the group of 20 countries. And obtained by the BBC, out economics correspondent T. W. reports.
The IMF is proposing a levy what he calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost taxpayers of any future government support for the sector. It would apply to all financial institutions. Overtime, the IMF suggested he could be refined to reflect the risk / each firms’ activities. And if the governments want to raise more money , the IMF suggested they put the additional tax on profits and the employees’ pay. The report also says there should be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise, there would be any incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.
The Iraqi military says it has killed another leading member of Al-Qaeda, he comes the day after the governments said its troops have killed the 2 most wanted Al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here’s J.M.
According to Iraqi military officials / was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces, somewhere near / in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of Al-Qaeda’s operations there and also in Kirkuk and Salahadian provinces. One report said that the intelligence for the attack came from the same country the Al-Qaeda official as the information that led to the raid which killed the 2 top Al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq early on Sunday morning.  Iraqi government leaders have convinced they now have Al-Qaeda leadership on the run.
BBC News.
Fresh allegations have surfaced to / in Sudan’s elections last week. A group of local observers released to video which reportedly shows men dressed in orange uniform of electional officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However, the Sudanese elections commission official denied / being any ballots stuffing or other rigging.
The Supreme Court in United States has ruled that a law that makes to crime to sell video of animals being tortured or killed / threat to free speech, the Supreme Court judgers which support the rulings says the law was too vague. And therefore, in French, the guarantee of free speech in the US constitution.   M.M in Washington.
The Supreme Court rulled the law banning animal / videos was overbroad. And invalidate onto the first amendment, a man should be sent into a 3 years in prison producing videos of / fighting, and attacking pigs and other animals appealed against to sentence. And the court found that / dog fighting is outlawed in every American State. The depiction of jotting should itself be illegal. The law had regionally been introduced to do with what known as crush videos that / films women in high-heels slowly crushing small animals to death.  
Some 3000 workers in Southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees about paying working conditions. The workers at an ammonium factory are also demanding the sacking of the official trade union representative whom they accuse of working for management.
A court in Britain / heard that a dead body undiscovered for nearly 10 years, in the tower block / in the western city of Burstal. Despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about the terrible stench.  The court heard that the man had been staying with a friend for a suddenly died. Council workers have visited to the flat put the smell down took overflowing drain. Burstal city council has apologized for failing to act earlier.
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要跳多少次才能飞起来?
每天半小时 轻松提高英语口语
本帖最后由 nolose 于 2010-4-21 18:38 编辑

on hardyzhou(感谢alert感谢sue~~)
BBC News with Sue Montgomery.

Britain is reopening all its airports with immediate effect, following six days in which flights were arrived round largely grounded by the plume of volcanic dust that is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British Aviation Regulator Dame Deirdre Hutton also announced new standards governing flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rules had been drawn up in consultation with the aircraft manufacturers and took account of the results of recent test flights.

The new guidance allows to face reintroduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no-fly-zones where concentration of ash levels are at unsafe levels for flights to take place. But that would be very much smaller than the present restrictions.

Throughout the day, some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdam and Frankfurt. But flight ban remains in place over large sweeps of the continent. Some news just in, the first flight has landed at Heathrow airport in London after the lifting of flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

The International Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for bailouts that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared for finance ministers from the group of 20 countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports.

The IMF is proposing a levy, what it calls a financial stability contribution to cover the cost the taxpayers' of any future government support for the sector. It would apply to all financial institutions. Over time the IMF suggests it could be refined to reflect the riskiness of each firm's activities. And if the government wants to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profits and then employees' pay. The reporter also says there should be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise, there would be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military says it's killed another leading member of al-Qaeda. It comes the day after the government said its troops had killed two most wanted al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here is Jim Muir.

According to Iraqi military officials, Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of al-Qaeda’s operations there, and also in Kirkuk and Salahuddin provinces. One report said that the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured al-Qaeda official as the information that led to the raid which killed the two top al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq early on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now have the al-Qaeda leadership on the run.

BBC News

Fresh allegations have surfaced of rigging in Sudan’s elections last week. A group of local observers released a video which reportedly shows men dressed in the orange uniform of election officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However, a Sudanese election commission official denied there'd been any ballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in the United States has ruled that a law that makes it a crime to sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judges who supported the ruling said the law was too vague and therefore infringed the guarantee of free speech in the US Constitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled the law of banning animal cruelty video was over broad and invalid under the first amendment. A man who has been sentenced to 3 years in prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs or other animals appealed against his sentence. And the court found although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state, the depiction of cruelty shouldn't itself be illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what known as crush videos.
Fetishistic film of women in high hills slowly crushing small animals to death.

Some 3000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to better pay and working conditions. The workers at an aluminium factory are also demanding the sacking of the official trade union representative whom they accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that a dead body lay undiscovered for nearly 10 years in a tower block flat in the western city of Bristol, despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about the terrible stench. The court heard that the man had been staying with a friend when he suddenly died. Council workers who visited the flat put the smell down to an overflowing drain. Bristol city has apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC News
走完同一条街,回到两个世界
本帖最后由 nolose 于 2010-4-23 17:58 编辑

hw
BBC News with Sue Montgomery.

Britain is reopening all itsairports with image effect, following six days in which flights / arrived / largely grounded by the plume of volcanic dustthat is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for theBritish Aviation Regulator Dame Deirdre Hutton also announced new standardsgoverning flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rules had been drawn upin consultation with the aircraft manufacturers and took account of the resultsof recent test flights.

The new guidance allows a phased reintroduction of much of the airspacewhich is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There willcontinue to be some no-fly-zones where concentrations of ash levels are atunsafe levels for flights to take place. But that would be very much smallerthan the present restrictions.

Throughout the day, some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdam and Frankfurt. But flight bans remains in place over large sweeps of the continent. Some news just in, the firstflight has landed at Heathrow airport in Londonafter the lifting of the flight ban. Britainannounced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

The International Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed onfinancial institutions to pay for any bailoutsthat might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paperprepared for finance ministers from the group of 20 countries and obtained bythe BBC. Our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports.

The IMF is proposing a levy, what it calls a financial stability contributionto cover the cost taxpayers' of any future government support for the sector.It would apply to all financial institutions. Over time the IMF suggests itcould be refined to reflect the riskiness of each firm's activities. And if governments wantto raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profits andthen employees' pay. The report also says that thereshould be a legal framework for sorting out troubled firms. Otherwise, therewould be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they wouldnot be allowed to fail.

The Iraqi military says it's killed another leading member of al-Qaeda. Itcomes the day after the government said its troops had killed two most wantedal-Qaeda leaders in Iraq.Here is Jim Muir.

According to Iraqi military officials, Ahmed al-Obeidi was killed in an earlymorning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They saidhe was in charge of al-Qaeda’s operations there, and also in Kirkuk and Salahuddin provinces. One reportsaid the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured al-Qaeda officialas the information that led to the raid which killed the two top al-Qaedaleaders in Iraqearly on Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they nowhave the al-Qaeda leadership on the run.

BBC News

Fresh allegations have surfaced of rigging in Sudan’s elections last week. Agroup of local observers released a videowhich reportedly shows men dressed in the orange uniform of election officialsstuffing voting slips into a ballot box. However, a Sudanese election’s commission official denied there being anyballot stuffing or other rigging.

The Supreme Court in the United  States has ruled that a law that makes it a crimeto sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to freespeech. The Supreme Court judges who supported the ruling said the law was toovague and therefore infringed the guarantee of free speech in the USConstitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled the law of banning animal cruelty video was over broadand invalid under the first amendment. A man who has been sentenced to 3 yearsin prison producing videos of pit bulls fighting and attacking pigs and other animals appealed against his sentence.And the court found although dog fighting is outlawed in every American state,the depiction of cruelty shouldn't itself be illegal. The law had originallybeen introduced to deal with what are knownas crush videos-- fetishistic films of women in high heelsslowly crushing small animals to death.

Some 3000 workers in southern Egyptare refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to better pay andworking conditions. The workers at an aluminium factory are also demanding thesacking of the official trade unionrepresentative whom they accused of working for management.

A court in Britain has heardthat a dead body lay undiscovered for nearly 10 years in a tower block flat inthe western city of Bristol,despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about the terrible stench. The courtheard that the man had been staying with a friend when he suddenly died.Council workers who visited the flat put the smell down to an overflowing drain. Bristol city councilhas apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC News


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  • nolose

口译专员推荐—>口译训练软件IPTAM口译通

HOMEWORK

本帖最后由 JC2009 于 2010-4-21 19:19 编辑

BBC news with Sue Montgomery.

Britain is reopening all its airports with immediate effect following 6 days in which flights were largely grounded by the plume of volcanic dust that is blown across much of Europe from Iceland. A spokeswoman for the British Aviation Regulator, D. D. H., also announced new standards governing flying in hazardous conditions. She said the rules had been drawn up in consultation with the aircraft manufacturers, and took account of the results of recent test flights.

"The new guidance allows us to face to re-introduction of much of the airspace which is currently closed due to the volcanic ash plume over the UK. There will continue to be some no-fly zones, where concentrations of ash levels are unsafe levels for flights to take place. But that will be very much smaller than the precedent restrictions."

Throughout the day, some flights resumed at the main international airports in Paris, Amsterdam and Frankfurt, but flight bans remains in place over large \\ of the continent.

Some news just in. The first flight has landed at Heathrow Airport in London after the lifting of the flight ban. Britain announced it was again opening its airspace to flights late on Tuesday.

International Monetary Fund is calling for new taxes to be imposed on financial institutions to pay for any bailouts that might be needed in the future. The proposals are contained in a paper prepared by financial ministers from the Group of 20 Countries and obtained by the BBC. Our economic correspondent Andrew Walker reports.

The IMF is proposing a levy what it calls "a financial stability contribution" to cover the cost-taxpayers of any future government support for the sector. It would be applied to all financial institutions. At the time, the IMF suggested it could be refined to affected risk of each firm's activities. And if governments want to raise more money, the IMF suggests they put an additional tax on profits and employee's pay. The report also says there should be a legal framer for sorting out troubled firms, otherwise there would be an incentive for them to take risks in the expectation that they would not be allowed to fail.


The Iraqi military says it's killed another leading member of al-Qaeda. It comes a day after the government said its troops had killed two most wanted al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq. Here's J. M.

According to Iraqi military officials, A M. was killed in an early morning attack by US and Iraqi forces somewhere near Mosul in the north of the country. They said he was in charge of al-Qaeda's operations there, and also in K.L. provinces. One report said the intelligence for the attack came from the same captured al-Qaeda official as the information led to the raid which killed two top al-Qaeda leaders in Iraq early in Sunday morning. Iraqi government leaders are convinced that they now have the al-Qaeda leadership on the run.

BBC news.

Fresh allegations have surfaced of rigging in Sudan's elections last week. A group of local observers released a video which reportedly shows men dressed in the orange uniform of the election officials stuffing voting slips into a ballot box.
However, a Sudanese Elections Commission official denied there's been any ballot stuffing or other rigging.


The Supreme Court in the United States has ruled that a law that makes it a crime to sell videos of animals being tortured or killed violates the right to free speech. The Supreme Court judges, who support the ruling, said the law was too vague, and there are four \\ the guarantee free speech in the US Constitution. Mark Mardell is in Washington.

The Supreme Court ruled that the law banning animal torture videos was overbroad, and invalid onto the First Amendment.
A man who had been sentenced to 3 years in prison
, producing videos of \\ fighting and attacking pigs and other animals, appealed against his sentence, and the court found that although dogfighting is outlawed in every American state, the depiction of cruelty shouldn't itself be illegal. The law had originally been introduced to deal with what are known as "crush videos" that show women in high heels slowly crush small animals to death.


Some 3,000 workers in southern Egypt are refusing to leave their factory until management agrees to about to pay in working conditions. The workers at the \\ factory are also demanding the sacking of the official trade union representative, who they accuse of working for management.

A court in Britain has heard that a dead body laid undiscorvered for nearly 10 years in a tar-block flat in the Western city of Bristol, despite neighbors repeatedly complaining about terrible stench. The court heard that the man had been staying with a friend who then suddenly died. Council workers has visited the flat, put the smell down to an overflowing drain. Bristol City Council has apologized for failing to act earlier.

BBC news


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