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[BBC] 【整理】BBC 2010-04-23

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Homework

BBC news with Sui Diomand

With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political party have held their second live televised election debate. It's doubted mainly with foreign policy that was between Prime Minister Gordon Brown for labor, David Cameron for the main Opposition Conservatives and Nick Clegg the Liberal Democrat leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's unclear weapon system with Mr.Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scrapped. Numi Greemi reports.

If debate game with Gordon Brown in knowledging particular with a TV popularity contest he would win, but he said he was the man to make the right decisions for Britain and he played his experience card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron the main Opposition Conservative leader seemed more relexed than he had been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr.Brown and Mr.Cameron used this debate to turn their thoron on Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg he's been enjoining dramatical bonds in popularity after last week's encounter. But Mr.Clegg delivered another strong performance, so would announce the polls to see his rating contiune to push upper words.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjanin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the Occupied East Jerusalem. Mr.Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle East envoy George Mitchell arrived at the region. Raly David reports from Jerusalem.

And A televition interview showed that after Mr.Mitchell touched down, Israeli Prime Minister said there would be no freeze in construction of new Jurish homes in East Jerusalem and area unexpelled Israel since 1967 and regarded this occupied territory under international law. But Washington has made it clear that hoping for significant confidence building measures from the Netanyahu government to try to help get to start the peace negociations.

The government in Pakistan has announced a new energy saving policy to come back to cuse power shortages which the Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gillani said we know a matter of national security. The measures include a 5-day working a week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorative lights on billboards. The BBC correspondence says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It has severely disrupted an industrial productivity while persistent power cuts about 16 hours have resulted in rioting.

At least 5 grenaded explosions have raped through central Bngkok killing 3 people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to arm's troops were pitted against anti-government red shirt protestors. The Thai government says the grenades were fire from the red shirts in garments but the protestors have denied any involvment. A group of rival demonstraters has also rally in the area creating what correspondents say it's a volutile mix.

World news from the BBC.

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposals for tighter regulation of the country's financial markets which he said it's the only way to avoid the economic turmoil in the future. Mr.Obama said that he was affirmed believer in the free market and the strong financial sector, however, he said stricter rules were needed to protect taxpayers from having to fund milt-billion-dollar bail-outs of the major banks.  

Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safe guards to ban the abuse, to check exercises that in sure that it is more profitable to play by rules than the game in the system. That is what the reforms we have been proposing are designed what we achieve.

The Olympic and World men's 400-meter champion Shawn Merit says that he has accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawer Howard Jacobs has said the positive test had been caused by Mr.Merit's use of those over the counter mainland hencemen drug which contains the banned steroid DHEA. Mr.Merit has apologized to his family and sponsors who having acted in the...manner.

Luanda's main opposition leader / has been released on bail after been a rest on charges of associating with terrorist group and denying the 1994 / her country. The court in Capital Kigali is posed strict bail conditions. / who was to have still against President Paul Kagamek in August's election says that she has faced a political harrisment since returing Ruanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of world's biggest food manufucture Neslay from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokeman for Russian Consumer watchdog confirmed the ban but offered no explanation for the decision.

That's the lastest world news from the BBC.
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  • atakan

on latonars

BBC News with Zoe Diamond

With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly with foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labour, David Cameron for the main opposition Conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's nuclear weapon system with Mr Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scrapped. Naomi Grimley reports.

This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest, he wouldn't win. But he said he was the man to make the right decisions for Britain and he played his experience card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main opposition Conservative leader, seemed more relaxed than he'd been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr Brown and Mr Cameron used this debate to turn their fire on the Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg. He's been enjoying a dramatic bounce in popularity of the last week's encounter. But Mr Clegg delivered another strong performance, so all eyes are now on the polls to see if his ratings continue to push upwards.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied East Jerusalem. Mr Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Wyre Davies reports from Jerusalem.

In a television interview shortly after Mr Mitchell touched down, Israel's prime minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of new Jewish homes in East Jerusalem, an area annexed by Israel since 1967 and regarded as occupied territory under international law. But Washington has made it clear that it's hoping for significant confidence-building measures from the Netanyahu government to try and help kick-start peace negotiations.

The government in Pakistan has announced a new energy-saving policy to combat acute power shortages which the Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani said were now a matter of national security. The measures include a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorative lights on billboards. The BBC correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It has severely disrupted industrial productivity while persistent power cuts of up to 16 hours have resulted in rioting.

At least five grenade explosions have ripped through central Bangkok, killing three people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to where armed troops are pitted against anti-government red-shirt protesters. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the red-shirts' encampment, but the protesters have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators has also rallied in the area, creating what correspondents say is a volatile mix.

World News from the BBC

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposals for tighter regulation of the country's financial markets which he said was the only way to avert economic turmoil in the future. Mr Obama said that he was a firm believer in the free market and a strong financial sector. However, he said stricter rules were needed to protect taxpayers from having to fund multi-billion-dollar bailouts of the major banks.

"Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguards that prevent abuse, that check excesses, that ensure that it is more profitable to play by the rules than to game the system. That is what the reforms we’ve been proposing are designed to achieve."

The Olympic and world men's 400m champion LaShawn Merritt says that he has accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawyer Howard Jacobs said the positive test had been caused by Mr Merritt's use of an over-the-counter male enhancement drug which contained the banned steroid DHEA. Mr Merritt has apologized to his family and sponsors for having acted in a foolish, immature and egotistical manner.

Rwanda's main opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza has been released on bail after being arrested on charges of associating with a terrorist group and denying the 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Ms Ingabire, who was to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August's election, says that she has faced political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of the world's biggest food manufacturers Nestle from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman for Russia's consumer watchdog confirmed the ban but offered no explanation for the decision.

That's the latest World News from the BBC.
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本帖最后由 nolose 于 2010-4-23 23:42 编辑

on atakan
BBC News with Zoe Diamond

With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly with foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labour, David Cameron for the main opposition Conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's nuclear weapon system with Mr Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scrapped. Naomi Grimley reports.
This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest he wouldn't win. But he said he was the man to make the right decisions for Britain and he played his experience card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main opposition Conservative leader, seemed more relaxed than he'd been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr Brown and Mr Cameron used this debate to turn their fire on the Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg. He's been enjoying a dramatic bounce in popularity of the last week's encounter. But Mr Clegg delivered another strong performance, so all eyes are now on the polls to see if his ratings continue to push upwards.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied East Jerusalem. Mr Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Wyre Davies reports from Jerusalem.
In a television interview shortly after Mr Mitchell touched down, Israel's prime minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of new Jewish homes in East Jerusalem, an area annexed by Israel since 1967 and regarded as occupied territory under international law. But Washington has made it clear that it's hoping for significant confidence-building measures from the Netanyahu government to try and help kick-start peace negotiations.

The government in Pakistan has announced a new energy-saving policy to combat acute power shortages which the Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani said were now a matter of national security. The measures include a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorative lights on billboards. The BBC correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It has severely disrupted industrial productivity while persistent power cuts of up to 16 hours have resulted in rioting.

At least five grenade explosions have ripped through central Bangkok, killing three people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to where armed troops are pitted against \ anti-government red-shirt protesters. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the red-shirts' encampment, but the protesters have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators has also rallied in the area, creating what \ correspondents say is a volatile mix.

World News from the BBC

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposals for tighter regulation of the country's financial markets which he said was the only way to avert economic turmoil in the future. Mr Obama said that he was a firm believer in the free market and a strong financial sector. However, he said stricter rules were needed to protect taxpayers from having to fund multi-billion-dollar bailouts of the major banks.
"Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguards that prevent abuse, that check excesses, that ensure that it is more profitable to play by the rules than to game the system. That is what the reforms we have been proposing are designed to achieve."

The Olympic and world men's 400m(体育竞技类单位书面用m即可) champion LaShawn Merritt says that he has accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawyer Howard Jacobs said the positive test had been caused by Mr Merritt's use of an over-the-counter male enhancement drug which contained the banned steroid DHEA. Mr Merritt has apologized to his family and sponsors for having acted in a foolish, immature and egotistical manner.

Rwanda's main opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza has been released on bail after being arrested on charges of associating with a terrorist group and denying the 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Ms Ingabire, who is to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August's election, says that she has faced political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of the world's biggest food manufacturers Nestle from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman for Russia's consumer watchdog confirmed the ban but offered no explanation for the decision.

That's the latest World News from the BBC.
1

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  • atakan

走完同一条街,回到两个世界
实现无障碍英语沟通
40# wjy124
因为楼下都是听友们的听写稿啊
口译专员推荐—>口译训练软件IPTAM口译通
Homework

BBC News with Zoe Diamond.

With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly with foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labor, David Cameron for the main opposition Conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's nuclear weapon system with Mr.Clegg being a only leader to call for it to be srapped. Naomi Grimley reports.

This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest he wouldn't win, but he said he was the man to make the right decisions for Britain and he played his experience card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main opposition Conservative leader, seemed more relaxed that he'd been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr.Brown and Mr.Cameron used this dabate to turn their thorough the Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg. He's been enjoying a dramatic bounds in popularity after last week's encounter. But Mr.Clegg delivered another strong performance so will our eyes on the polls to see if his ratings continue to push upwards.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied East Jerusalem. Mr.Netanyahu restated his position as the US middle-east envoy George Mitchell arrive in the region. Wyre Davies reports from Jerusalem.

In a television interview shortly after Mr.Mitchell touched down, Israel's Prime Minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of new Jewish homes in East Jerusalem. An area annexed by Israel since 1967 and regarded as occupied territory under international law. But Washington has made it clear that it's hoping for significant confidence building measures from the Netanyahu government to try to help ticks down peace negotiations.     

The government in Parkistan has announced a new energy saving policy to combat acute power shortages which the Prime Minister Yusaf Raza Gilani said it were now a matter of national security. The measures include a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorate of lights on billboards. The BBC correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability, it has severely disrupted  industrial productivity while persistent power cuts of up to 16 hours have resulted in rioting.

At least five grenades explosion have ripped through central Bangkok killing three people and injuring dozens. The blasts happens close to where armed troops are pitted against anti-government red-shirt protesters. The Thai government saysthe grenades were fired from the red-shirt in complement but the protester have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators is also rallied in the area creating what correspondents say is a volatile mix.   

World News from the BBC.

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposals for tighter regulation of the country's financial markets which he said was the only way to avert economic turmoil in the future. Mr.Obama said that he was a firm believer in the free market and strong financial sector. However, he said stricts real were needed to protect taxpayers from having to fund multi-billion-dollar bailout of the major banks.

"Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguards that prevent abuse that check excesses, that ensure that it is more profitbable to play by the rule than to game the system. That is what the reforms we've been proposing are designed to achieve."

The Olympic and World Men's 400 meter Champion LaShawn Merritt says that he has accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawyer Howard Jacobs said the positive test had been caused by Mr.Merritt's use of an over the counter male enhancement drug which contains the banned steriod DHEA. Mr.Merritt has apologized to his family and sponsors for having acted in a foolish, immature and egotistical manner.

Rwanda's main opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza has been released on bail after being arrested on charges of associating with a terrorist group and denying the 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Mrs.Ingabire who was to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August's election says that she has faced political harrassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of the world's biggest food manufaturer Nestle from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman for Russia's Consumer watchdog confirmed the ban but offered no explaination for the decision.

That's the latest world news from the BBC.
捌零音乐论坛
http://www.pt80.com/?fromuid=502847
HW

BBC news with Zoe Diamond

With two weeks to go before the general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly about foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labour, David Cameron for the main opposition Conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain’s nuclear weapon system with Mr. Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scrapped. Naomi Grimley reports.
This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if this was a TV popularity context, he wouldn’t win, but he said he was the man to make the right decision for Britain and he played his experience card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main opposition Conservative leader, seemed more relaxed than he’d been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which delivered a real change. Both Mr. Brown and Mr. Cameron used this debate to turn their fire on the Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg. He’s been enjoying a dramatic bounce in popularity of last week’s encounter, but Mr. Clegg delivered another strong performance, saying all eyes are on the polls to see if his rating continues to push upwards.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied East Jerusalem. Mr. Netanyahu restated his position as the U.S. Middle East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Wyre Davies reports from East Jerusalem.
In a television interview shortly after Mr. Netanyahu touched down, Israel’s Prime Minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of new Jewish home in East Jerusalem—an area annexed by Israel since 1967 and regarded as occupied territory under international law. But Washington has made it clear that it’s hoping significant confidence-building measures from the Netanyahu government to try to help restart peace negotiations.

The government in Pakistan has announced new energy saving policies to combat acute power shortages, which the Prime Minister Yusaf Raza Gilani said it were now a matter of national security. The measures include a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shortening webbing ceremonies and decorate lights on billboards. The BBC’s correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It has severely disrupted industrial productivity while persistent power cuts of up to 16 hours have resulted in rioting.

At least five grenades explosions have ripped through central Bangkok, killing three people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to armed troops are pitted against anti-government red-shirt protestors. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the red-shirts in complement but the protestors have denied any involvement. A group of demonstrators are also rallied in the area, creating what correspondent said is a volatile mix.

World news from the BBC.

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposals for tighter regulations of the country’s financial markets, which he said is the only way to avoid economic turmoil in the future. Mr. Obama says he was a firm believer in the free market and a strong financial sector. However, he said stricter rules were needed to protect taxpayer from having to fund multi-billion-dollar bailouts to the major banks.
Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguards to prevent abuse, that check excesses, that ensured that it is more profitable to play by the rule and game the system. That’s what reforms we have been proposing are designed to achieve.

The Olympic and World Men's 400 metre Champion LaShawn Merritt says that he has accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawyer, Howard Jacobs, said the positive test had been caused by Mr. Merritt’s use of an over-the-counter male enhancement drug, which contains the banned steroid DHEA. Mr. Merritt apologised to his family and sponsors having acted a foolish, immature and egotistical manner.

Rwanda's main opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza has been released on bail after being arrested on charges over associating with terrorist groups and denying the 1994 genocide in the country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Mrs. Ingabire, who was to stand against President Paul Kagame in August’s election says she’s facing political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of the world’s biggest food manufacturers Nestle from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman from Russia’s consumer watchdog confirmed the ban but offers no explanation for the decision.

That’s the latest world news from the BBC.
freeze on sth是固定搭配, e.g. freeze on construction, freeze on production of nuclear weapons
freeze in的话+地点/时间, e.g.freeze in East Jerusalem, freeze in April

Ms Ingabire, who is to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August's election, says that she has faced political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.
Aug还没到呢后面也只一般现在时,怎么中间从句就要用过去时呢?
前面的/u:/音连读起来让人误解了吧?
带我装13带我飞(¯﹃¯)
实现无障碍英语沟通
ON 沙白
BBC News with Zoe Diamond.

With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt main with foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labour, David Cameron for the main opposition Conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's nuclear weapon system, with Mr.Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scrapped. Naomi Grimley reports.

This debate the gang with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest, he wouldn't win. But he said he was the man to make the right decisions for Britain and he played his experience card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main Opposition Conservative leader seemed more relax than he'd been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr.Brown and Mr.Cameron use this debate to turn ... the Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg. He's been enjoying a dramatic bounds in popularity after last week's encounter. But Clegg delivered another strong performance so will our eyes are now on the polls to see if his ratings continue to push up words.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied East Jerusalem. Mr.Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle-East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Wyre Davies reports from Jerusalem.

In a television interview shortly after Mr.Mitchell touched down, Israel's Prime Minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of new Jewish homes in East Jerusalem. An area ... by Israel since 1967 and regarded as occupied territory under international law. But Washington has made it clear that it's hoping for significant confidence building measures from the Netanyahu government to try and help Kyrgyzstan peace negotiations.

The government in Pakistan has announced new energy saving policy to combat acute power short suggest which the Prime Minister Yusaf Raza Gilani said it were now in matter of national security. The measures include a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorate of lights on billboards. The BBC correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It severely disrupted industrial productivity while persistent power cuts of up to six hours have resulted in rioting.

At least five grenaded explosions have ripped through central Bangkok, killing three people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to where armed troops are pit against the anti-government red-shirt protesters. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the red-shirts in complement. But the protesters have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators has also rallied in the area, creating what our correspondent say is a volatile mix.

World News from the BBC.

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposals for tighter regulation of the country's financial markets which he said was the only way to evert economic turmoil in the future. Mr.Obama said that he was a firm believer in the free market under a strong financial sector. However, he said strict real were needed to protect taxpayers from having to fund multi-billion dollar bailout of the major banks.

"Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguards that prevent abuse that check excesses, that ensure it is more profitable to play by the rules than to game the system. That's what the reforms we have been proposing or designed to achieve."

The Olympic and World Men's 400 metres champion LaShawn Merritt says that he has accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawyer Howard Jacobs said the positive test had been caused by Mr.Merritt's use of an over-the-counter male enhancement drug which contains the banned stelloid DHEA. Mr.Merritt has apologized to his family and sponsors for having acted in a foolish, immature and egotistical manner.

Rwanda's main opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza has released on bail after being arrested on charges of associating with a terrorist group and denying the 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Mrs.Ingabire who was to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August's election says that she has faced political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of the world's biggest food manufacturer Nestle from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman for Russia's consumer watchdog confirmed the ban but offered no explanation for the decision.

That's the latest World News from the BBC.
我胡汉三又回来了!
普特听力大课堂
homework
BBC News with Zoe Diamond.

With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly with foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labour, David Cameron for the main opposition Conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's nuclear weapon system, with Mr. Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scrapped. Naomi Grimley reports.

This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest, he wouldn't win. But he said he was the man to make the right decisions for Britain and he played his experienced card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main Opposition Conservative leader seemed more relaxed than he'd been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr. Brown and Mr. Cameron used this debate to turn their thorn on the Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg. He's been enjoying a dramatic bound in popularity after last week's encounter. But Mr. Clegg delivered another strong performance so will our eyes are now on the polls to see if his ratings continue to push upwards.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied East Jerusalem. Mr. Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle-East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Wyre Davies reports from Jerusalem.

In a television interview shortly after Mr. Mitchell touched down, Israel's Prime Minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of new Jewish homes in East Jerusalem. An area annexed by Israel since 1967 and regarded as occupied territory under international law. But Washington has made it clear that it's hoping for significant confidence building measures from the Netanyahu government to try and help Kyrgyzstan peace negotiations.

The government in Pakistan has announced new energy saving policy to combat acute power shortages which the Prime Minister Yusaf Raza Gilani said it was now a matter of national security. The measures include a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorate of lights on billboards. The BBC correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It severely disrupted industrial productivity while persistent power cuts of up to six hours have resulted in rioting.

At least five grenade explosions have ripped through central Bangkok, killing three people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to where armed troops are pit against the anti-government red-shirt protesters. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the red-shirts in complement. But the protesters have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators has also rallied in the area, creating what our correspondents say is a volatile mix.

World News from the BBC.

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposals for tighter regulation of the country's financial markets which he said was the only way to avert economic turmoil in the future. Mr. Obama said that he was a firm believer in the free market under a strong financial sector. However, he said strict rules were needed to protect taxpayers from having to fund multi-billion dollar bailout of the major banks.

Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguards that prevent abuse that check accesses that ensure that it is more profitable to play by the rules than the game the system. That's what the reforms we have been proposing or designed to achieve.

The Olympic and World Men's 400-metre champion LaShawn Merritt says that he has accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawyer Howard Jacobs said the positive test had been caused by Mr. Merritt's use of an over-the-counter male enhancement drug which contains the banned steroid DHEA. Mr. Merritt has apologized to his family and sponsors for having acted in a foolish, immature and egotistical manner.

Rwanda's main opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza has been released on bail after being arrested on charges of associating with a terrorist group and denying the 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Mrs. Ingabire who was to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August's election says that she has faced political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of the world's biggest food manufacturer Nestle from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman for Russia's consumer watchdog confirmed the ban but offered no explanation for the decision.

That's the latest World News from the BBC.
好栏目推荐之美国口语俚语
52# latonars
1
这里BBC是引用了Mr Netanyahu的原话吧
BBC News - Netanyahu refuses to budge over Jerusalem construction
23 Apr 2010 ... Mr Netanyahu said "there will be no freeze in Jerusalem" ... planning to build 1600 apartments in the Orthodox ...
news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/8638895.stm


2
这问题我也想过,8过这个w音蛮明显的~ 新闻的意思是不是说 Ms Ingabire原本计划在8月的选举中对抗现总统,但现在遭到了政治骚扰云云
BBC News - Kagame rival arrested in Rwanda
21 Apr 2010 ... Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza was to challenge President Paul Kagame in August's election. However, a police spokesman said she had committed ...
news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8635890.stm




latoMM你看呢

HM

BBC news with Zoe Diamond.

With two weeks to go before the British General Election, the leaders of the three main political paraties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly with foreign policy, and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labor, David Cameron for the main oppostion Conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democratic leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's nuclear weapon system, with Mr. Clegg being the only leader to cally for it to be scrapped. Naomi G. reports.

He's debated the gang with Mr. Brown, ackowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest, he wouldn't win, but he said he was the man to make the right decision for Britain, and he played his experience card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main opposition Conservative leader, seemed more relax than he being in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver a real change. Both Mr. Brown and Mr. Cameron use this debate to turn their thorn on the Liberal Democratic leader Nick Clegg, who's being enjoying a dramatic bouncing popularity off their last week's encounter. But Mr. Clegg delivered another strong performance, so all eyes are now on the polls to see if his rating is continuing to push upwards.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benyamin Natenyahu has again rejected calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied east Jarusalem. Mr.Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Reed Davis reports from Jarusalem.

In a television interview shortly after Mr. Mitchell touched down, Israel's Prime Minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of new Jewish homes in the east Jarusalem, an area annexed by Israel since 1967, and regarded as an occupied territory in the international law. But Washington has made it clear that it's hoping for significant confidence building measures from the Netanyahu government to try to help get start of peace negotiations.

The government in Pakistan has announced a new energy saving policy to combat acute power shortages, which the Prime Minister Usuf Raza Gilani said ware now a matter of national security. The measures include a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorate of lights on billborad. The BBC correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It severely disrupted industrial activity while persistent power cuts about 16 hours have resulted in rioting.

At least 5 grenade explosions have swept through central Bankok, killing 3 people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to where armed troops are protected against anti-government red-shirt protestors. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the Red Shirt's encampment, but protestors have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators have also rallied in the area, creating what correpondents say is a "volatile mix".

World news from the BBC.

Mr. Obama has urged Wall Street Bankers in New York to support his proposals for tight regulation of the country's financial markets, which he said was the only way to avert economic turmoil in the future. Mr. Obama says that he was a firm believer in the free market and strong financial sector. However, he said strict rules were needed to protect taxpayer from having to fund multi-billion-dollar bailouts of the major banks.

"Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguards that prevent abuse, \\, accesses that ensure that it is more profitable to play by the rules than the game and system. That is what the reforms we've been proposing are designed to achieve."

The Olympic and World men's 400 champion LaShawn Merrit says that he's accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawyer Howard Jacobs said the positive test had been caused by Mr. Merrit's use of an over-the-counter male enhancement drug, which contained the banned steroid, DHEA. Mr. Merrit has apologized to his family and sponsors for having acted in a foolish, immature and egotistic manner.

Rwanda's main opposition leader Vicotoire Ingabire Umuhoza has been released on bail after being arrested in charges of associating with a terrorist group, and denying a 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Ms. Ingabire, who was to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August election, says that she has faced political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.

Russia has banned one of the world's biggest food manufacturers, Leslie from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman for Russia's consumer watchdog confirmed the ban, but offered no explanation for the decision.

That's the latest world news from the BBC.
Homework
BBC news with Zoe Diamond

With two weeks to go before the British general election the leaders of the three main political parties has held their second live-television debates. It dealt mainly with forgein policy and with between the prime minister Gordon Brown from Labor, David Cameron from the main opposition conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democratic leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain nuclear weapon system with Mr. Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scraped. xx reportes.

“This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledgeing that if it was a popularity contest he would not win. But he said he was the man who made the right decisions for Britain and he played his experience course during the questions on following affairs. David Cameron, the main  opposition conservatives leader seemed more relaxed than he had been in the first debate. He aruged that his party would be the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr. Brown and Mr. Cameron used this debate to turn their thoughts on the Liberal Democratic leader Nick Clegg. He’s been enjoying a dramatic bound in popularity of last week’s encounter. But Mr. Clegg delivered another strong performance XXX”

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has against rejected call from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied east Jerusalem. Mr. Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle East Envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. XX David reports from Jerusalem.

“In a television interview shortly after Mr. Mitchell touched down, Israel Prime Minister said there would be no free in the construction of new Jewish home in east Jerusalem, an area XX by Israel since 1967 and regarded as an occupied territory in the international law. But Washington has made it clear that hoping for significant confident building method for Mr. Netanyahu to try help  establish peace negotiation.”

The government in Pakistan has announced a new engergy saving policy to combat a XX power shorteges, which the Prime Minister Mr. Asif Ali Zardari said now would matter national security. The methods include a five-day working week, the closing of shops and XX for wedding ceremony and no decorates of lights on buildballs. The BBC correspodent said the engergy crisis has contributed to political instability. It’s seviourly disrupted industrial productivity while persistent powercut about 16 hours had resulted in rioting.  

At least 5 grenades explosions had X central Bongkok, killing 3 people and injurying dozens. The blast happened closed to an arm troop XX against anti-government red-shirt protesters. The Thai government said the grenades were fired from the red-shirt XX. But the protesters have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators had also rallied in the area, creating what correspondents say is XX mess.

World news from the BBC.

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposal for tighter regulations on the country’s financial markets, which he said is the only way to avoid economic XX in the future. Mr. Obama said that he is a firm believer in the free market and strong financial sector. However he said stricter rules are needed to protect taxpayers from having to fund multimillions dollars bailout in the major banks.

“Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safe guard that prevent abuse, that check accesses, that ensure that it is more profitable to play by the XX than the game of system. That’s what the reform we’ve been proposing are designed to achieve.”

The Olympic world men 400 meter champion XX said that he accepted a XX suspension after failing a XX test. His lawyer Harry XX said the positive test has been called by Mr. XX used over the counter mainland XX , which contain the XX, DHEA. Mr. XX has appologied to his family and sponsors for having acted in X and X Xmanner.

Ruanda’s main opposition leader XX has been released on X after being arrested on charge of associating with terrorist group and denied the 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strick X conditions. Mrs. XX, who X has stood against President Paul Kagame in Auguest selection said that she has faced political harassment since returning to Ruanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of the world’s biggest food manufacture XX from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman from Russia Consumer Watchdog confirmed the ban but offered no explaination for the decision.

That is the lasted world news from BBC.
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Homework ~~~ Enjoy walking

With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly with foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labor, David Cameron for the main opposition Conservatives and Nide Clack, the Labor Democratic Leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's nuclear weapon system, with Mr. Clag being the only leader to call for it to be scraped. Liomi Griming reports.



This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest, he wouldn't win. But he says he was the man to make the right decisions for Britain and he placed his experience call during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main opposition Conservatives Leader seem more relax than he'd been the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr. Brown and Mr. Cameron used this debate to turn the fire on the Labor Democrat Leader Nide Clack, he's been joining the dramatic bounce in popularity of last week's encounter. But Clegg delivered another strong performance, so all eyes are now on the polls to see if his ratings continue to push up words.



The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied East Jerusalem. Mr. Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle-East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Wyre Davies reports from Jerusalem.



In a television interview after Mr. Mitchell touched done, Israel's Prime Minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of new Jewish homes in East Jerusalem, an area annexed by Israel since 1967 and regarded as occupied territory in the international law. But Washington has made it clear that it's hoping for significant confidence building measures from the Netanyahu government to try and help *** peace negotiations.



The government in Pakistan has announced a new energy saving policy to combat acute power shortages which the Prime Minister Yusaf Raza Gilani said it were now in matter of national security. The measures included a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorate of lights on billboards. The BBC correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It severely disrupted industrial productivity while persistent power cuts of up to six hours have resulted in rioting.



At least five grenade explosions have ripped through Bangkok, killing three people and injuring dozens. The blast happens close to where army troops are pit against the anti-government red-shirt protesters. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the red-shirts in complement. But the protesters have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators has also rallied in the area, creating what our correspondent say it's a volatile mix.



World news from BBC.

订正后:
Homework: BBC 2010-4-23
BBC news with Zoe Diamond

    With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly with foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labour, David Cameron for the main opposition conservatives and Nick Clegg, the liberal democratic leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over the British nuclear weapon system, with Mr. Nick Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scrapped, Naomi Grimly reports.


This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest, he wouldn’t win. But he said he was the man to make the right decision for Britain, and he played his experience card during the questions on the foreigner’s affairs. David Cameron, the main opposition conservative leader, seemed more relaxed than he’d been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver the real change. Both Mr. Brown and Mr. Cameron used this debate to turn their fire on the liberal democratic leader Nick Clegg. He has been enjoying a dramatic bounce in popularity of the last week encounter. But Mr. Clegg delivered another strong performance, so all eyes are now on the polls to see if his ratings continue to push upwards.


    The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the
United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied Eastern Jerusalem. Mr. Netanyahu restated his position, as US
Middle East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Wyre Davies repots from Jerusalem.

In a television interview shortly after Mr. Mitchell touched down, Israel’s Prime Minister said there would be no freeze in the construction of the new Jewish homes in Jerusalem, an area annexed by Israel since 1967 and regarded as the occupied territory under the international law. But Washington has made it clear that it’s hoping for the significant confidence-building measures from the Netanyahu government to try and help kick-start peace negotiations.



The government in
Pakistan has announced a new energy-saving policy to combat acute power shortages, which the Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gialni said were now a matter of national security. The measures include a five-days working in a week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorative lights on the billboards. The BBC correspondent says energy crisis has contributed to political instabilities. It has severely disrupted Industrial productivity while persistent power cuts off up to 16 hours have resulted in rioting.


    At least five grenade explosions have ripped through centre
Bangkok killing three people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to where the armed troops are pitted against the anti-government red-skirt protesters. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the red-skirt encampment, but the protesters have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators has also rallied in the area, creating what correspondents say is a volatile mix.

World News from the BBC



President Obama has urged Wall Street Bankers in
New York to support his proposal for tightly regulation of the country’s financial markets, which he said was the only way to avert the economic turmoil in the future. Mr. Obama said that he was a firm believer in the free market and a strong financial sector. However, he said stricter rulers are needed to protect the taxpayers from having to fund the multi-billion-dollars bail-outs of the major banks.



“Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguard that prevent abuse, that check excess and that ensure that it is more profitable to play by the rules than game the system. That is what the reforms we’ve been proposing are designed to achieve.




The Olympic and world’s men 400m champion LaShawn Merritt says that he has accepted a provisional suspension, after failing a doping test. His lawyer Howard Jacob said that the positive test had been caused by Mr. Merritt’s use of an over-the-counter male enhancement drug which contained the banned steroid DHEA. Mr. Merritt has apologized to his family and sponsors for having acted in a foolish, immature and egotistical manner.
Rwanda’s main opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza has been released on bail after being arrested on charges of associating with a terrorist group and denying the 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Ms Ingabire, who was to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August’s election, says that she has faced political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January



Moscow has banned one of world’s biggest food manufacturer Nestle from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman for the
Russia’s consumer watchdogs confirmed the ban but offered no explanation for the decision.



That’s the latest World News from the BBC.
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With two weeks to go before the British general election, the leaders of the three main political parties have held their second live televised election debate. It dealt mainly with foreign policy and was between the Prime Minister Gordon Brown for Labour, David Cameron for the main opposition Conservatives and Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader. The biggest difference between the leaders was over Britain's nuclear weapon system, with Mr Clegg being the only leader to call for it to be scrapped. Naomi Grimley reports.

This debate began with Gordon Brown acknowledging that if it was a TV popularity contest, he wouldn't win. But he said he was the man to make the right decisions for Britain and he played his experience card during the questions on foreign affairs. David Cameron, the main opposition Conservative leader, seemed more relaxed than he'd been in the first debate. He argued that his party was the only one which could deliver real change. Both Mr Brown and Mr Cameron used this debate to turn their fire on the Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg. He's been enjoying a dramatic bounce in popularity of the last week's encounter. But Mr Clegg delivered another strong performance, so all eyes are now on the polls to see if his ratings continue to push upwards.

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again rejected calls from the United States to stop settlement construction in the occupied East Jerusalem. Mr Netanyahu restated his position as the US Middle East envoy George Mitchell arrived in the region. Wyre Davies reports from Jerusalem.

In a television interview shortly after Mr Mitchell touched down, Israel's prime minister said there would be no freeze
in the construction of new Jewish homes in East Jerusalem, an area annexed by Israel since 1967 and regarded as occupied territory under international law. But Washington has made it clear that it's hoping for significant confidence-building measures from the Netanyahu government to try and help kick-start peace negotiations.

The government in Pakistan has announced a new energy-saving policy to combat acute power shortages which the Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani said were now a matter of national security. The measures include a five-day working week, the closing of shops at dusk, shorter wedding ceremonies and no decorative lights on billboards. The BBC correspondent says the energy crisis has contributed to political instability. It has severely disrupted industrial productivity while persistent power cuts of up to 16 hours have resulted in rioting.

At least five grenade explosions have ripped through central Bangkok, killing three people and injuring dozens. The blasts happened close to where armed troops are pitted against anti-government red-shirt protesters. The Thai government says the grenades were fired from the red-shirts' encampment, but the protesters have denied any involvement. A group of rival demonstrators has also rallied in the area, creating what correspondents say is a volatile mix.

World News from the BBC

President Obama has urged Wall Street bankers in New York to support his proposals for tighter regulation of the country's financial markets which he said was the only way to avert economic turmoil in the future. Mr Obama said that he was a firm believer in the free market and a strong financial sector. However, he said stricter rules were needed to protect taxpayers from having to fund multi-billion-dollar bail-outs of the major banks.

"Our system only works, our markets are only free when there are basic safeguards that prevent abuse, that check excesses, that ensure that it is more profitable to play by the rules than to game the system. That is what the reforms we
’ve been proposing are designed to achieve."

The Olympic and world men's 400m champion LaShawn Merritt says that he has accepted a provisional suspension after failing a doping test. His lawyer Howard Jacobs said the positive test had been caused by Mr Merritt's use of an over-the-counter male enhancement drug which contained the banned steroid DHEA. Mr Merritt has apologized to his family and sponsors for having acted in a foolish, immature and egotistical manner.

Rwanda's main opposition leader Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza has been released on bail after being arrested on charges of associating with a terrorist group and denying the 1994 genocide in her country. The court in the capital Kigali imposed strict bail conditions. Ms Ingabire, who
was to have stood against President Paul Kagame in August's election, says that she has faced political harassment since returning to Rwanda from exile in January.

Moscow has banned one of the world's biggest food manufacturers Nestle from selling baby food products to Russia. A spokesman for Russia's consumer watchdog confirmed the ban but offered no explanation for the decision.

That's the latest World News from the BBC.
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