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标题: [英伦广角] 【整理】2009-06-07 政要云集 纪念诺曼底登陆65周年 (法国总统的求confirmation) [打印本页]

作者: qingchengshan    时间: 2009-6-7 19:50     标题: 【整理】2009-06-07 政要云集 纪念诺曼底登陆65周年 (法国总统的求confirmation)

本帖最后由 sainfoinwy 于 2009-6-13 13:10 编辑

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D-Day: World Leaders Remember


World leaders have gathered in Northern France to commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day Landings. Gordon Brown, President Sarkozy and President Obama honoured those who gave their lives in the push to liberate Europe from the Nazis.



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【整理】

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the lives of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify yourself this day as we pause to fittingly remember those men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during the Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of as they stared at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist. What were they thinking of? Of the all too brief lives?  Of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children? Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of the tears that will be shed on the land that
has been abused?  What were those soldiers thinking of, whose destiny it was to decide the fate of so many peoples? What were they thinking of, if not that "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-five years ago, in the thin light of a grey dawn, more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And now more than half a century on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

Long after our time on this Earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year?  Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than in 1944.

 

A grain of sand is smaller than a millimeter.



作者: jmmom    时间: 2009-6-8 14:12

本帖最后由 jmmom 于 2009-6-8 14:17 编辑

HW

“Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day Landings that took place in the early morning hours of6th June, 1944.
Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.
Included among those so honored are the 3881 who lost their life on D-Day on Omaha Beach and the 9387 of our death who are buried at this cemetery.”

“Our gracious and loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the life of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.
Magnify Yourself this day as we pause to think and remember those men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during Second World War.”

“They numbered 135,000 on the thousands %&^%.
They formed two armies: one America,the other British and Canadians.
Some asked earlier Eisenhower: ‘Good wisdom, good luck or good fight!’ What are those young soldiers thinking of?
They said nothing but the black line of the coast merging from the mist.
What were they thinking? Of their too brief life?
Of the way their mother gently kissed their forehead when they were children?
Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?
Of tears that will be shed on the land when they are confused?
What were the soldiers thinking of is the destiny of wars that decide the fate of so many people.
What were they thinking of if not what ‘20 years old is too young to die’?”

“Sixty-five years ago, in the sunlight of great dawn, more than a thousand small crafts took %&%
on the day that will be forever of a day of grieving.
On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto this beach below and into history.
As long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.
And now more than a half century on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends—President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and British royal Highness—Prince of Wale.
Each of us is representing the people of our nations, as we gather to solute the great fighting men of the largest affiliated operation in the end of those warfares.
We remember those who would dance Great of Sand by grain of sand, ultimately determined to take the bullet of the bloodshed.
The freedom will not be pushed back into the sea.
But will rise from this beach below to liberate the continent and to save the generation.”

“Long after our time on the service of our past, one word will still bring forth the pride that all men and women will never meet the heroes that sit before us.
D-Day! Why is this?
Of all the battles, all the wars across the stand of human history, why does this day own such a revered place of our memory? What is it that struggle took place on the sands few short steps from here that bring us back to memory year after year after year.
Part of it I think is the size of the odds it waved against success.
For three centuries no invader had ever been able to cross the English channel into Normandy.
It had never been more difficult than 1944.”

(Gunshot)
作者: incambrian77    时间: 2009-6-8 14:15

HW

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944. Today’s ceremony we’ll honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated. Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day on Omaha beach and 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our bravest loving father Harper, we act for the blessing of your presents, on this significant event that touching the minds of families and citizens are the grateful nations here represented, magnify yourself these day as we posed to *remember these men and women who made noble sacrifice for the freedom of us and the allied nations during the WWⅡ.

They numbered 135,000 on thousands of us, they formed two armies, one American, the other British and Canadian. Some few hours earlier, Eisenhower had wished them “Good luck! ” All were silent. What these young soldiers thinking of, their stared the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist? What were their thinking? With their all too brief life? With the way their mothers tenderly kissed their foreheads when they were children? Of the way their fathers hold back the tears when they left for the war? The tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused? What were those young soldiers thinking of, their destiny, after all, will define the fate of so many peoples. What were they thinking of? If not that, 20 years old it is too young to die?

65 years ago, in the same light of a great down, more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea, on the day that will be forever: a day of bravery. On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and entered history. As long as freedom lives, then this will never die. And now more than half a century on, it’s an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with his Highness Prince of Wales. Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, and together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the annals of warfare. We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and save a generation.

And long after our time on this Earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women who will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history, why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory?  What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year? Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success.  For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy.  And it had never been more difficult than in 1944.
作者: Sunshake    时间: 2009-6-8 14:53

ON incambrian77

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944. Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated. Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

 

Our gracious loving father Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence, on this significant event that touches the minds of the families and citizens are the grateful nations here represented, magnify yourself these day as we posed to fittingly remember those men and women who made the noble(the Normandy? Aid the old man? ) sacrifice, for the freedom of France and the allied nations during the Second World War.

 

They numbered 135,000 on thousands of us, they formed two armies, one American, the other British and Canadian. Some hours earlier, Eisenhower had wished them “Good luck! ” All were silent. What these young soldiers thinking of, their stared the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist? What were they thinking? ..(连接前面的think)of their all too brief lives? ..of the way their mothers tenderly kissed their foreheads when they were children? ..Of the way their fathers hold back the tears when they left for the war? ..of tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused? What were those young soldiers thinking of, it’s destiny at all, will decide the fate of so many peoples. What were they thinking of? If not that, 20 years old it is too young to die?

 

65 years ago, in the same light of a great dawn, more than a thousand small craft draw to a rough sea, on the day that will be forever: a day of bravery. On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die. And now, more than half a century on, it’s an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with his Royal Highness Prince of Wales. Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the annals of warfare. We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea, but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

 

Long after our time on this Earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women who will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history, why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory?  What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year? Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success.  For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy.  And it had never been more difficult than in 1944.


作者: jmmom    时间: 2009-6-8 15:44

4# Sunshake
On Sunshake
(By the way, incrambrian77 did a very great job.  I had a headache after I transcribed it.  It was hard for me because of all the echoes... )

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the life of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify Yourself this day as we pause to think and remember those men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 on thousands of us.  They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of?  They stared the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist.  What were they thinking of their all too brief life?  Of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children?  Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused?  What were the soldiers thinking of is the destiny of wars that would decide the fate of so many peoples.  What were they thinking of if not what "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-five
years ago, in the sunlight of great dawn, more than a thousand small crafts took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever of a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history.  And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And now more than half century on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and British Royal Highness-Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, and together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  Weremember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterlydetermined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not bepushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

And long after our time on this earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes that sit before us: D-Day. Why is this?  Of all the battles and all the wars across the span of human history, why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to memory year after year after year.  Partof it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success.For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the EnglishChannel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than 1944.
作者: 睡觉吧兔子    时间: 2009-6-8 16:13     标题: HOMEWORK

本帖最后由 睡觉吧兔子 于 2009-6-8 16:15 编辑

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presenceon this significant event that touches the lives of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify Yourself this day as we pause to think and remember those men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 on thousands of us France.  Theyformed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlierEisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What werethoseyoung soldiers thinking of?  They stared at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist.  What were they thinkingof their all too brief lives?Of the way their mothers gentlykissed their foreheads when they were children?  Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused?  What were those soldiers thinking of is the destiny of wars that would decide the fate of so many peoples.  What were they thinking of ifnot that "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-fiveyears ago, in the same lightof great dawn, more than a thousand small crafts took to a rough seaon the day that will be foreverof a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history.  And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And nowmore than half century on, itis an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with His Royal Highness-Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, and together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the seabut would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.
And long after our time on this earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this?Of all the battles and all the wars across the span of human history, why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to memory year after year after year?  Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than 1944.
作者: 一叶星空    时间: 2009-6-8 16:21     标题: on jmmom

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the life of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify yourself this day as we pause to think and remember those men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 on thousands of us.  They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of?  They stared
at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist.  What were they thinking of? Of all too brief life?  Of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children?  Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused?  What were those soldiers thinking of is the destiny of wars that would decide the fate of so many peoples.  What were they thinking of if not what "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-five
years ago, in the
thin light of a great dawn, more than a thousand small crafts took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever /of/ a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history.  And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And now more than half century on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and British Royal Highness-Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

And long after our time on this earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes that sit before us: D-Day. Why is this?  Of all the battles and all the wars across the span of human history, why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to memory year after year after year.  Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than 1944.


作者: phantom932    时间: 2009-6-8 18:00

On 一叶星空



Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 among our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the life of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify yourself this day as we pause to XX remember those men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during the Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of? They stared at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist. What were they thinking of? Of the ode to brief life?  Of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children? Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused?  What were those soldiers thinking of is the destiny of wars that would decide the fate of so many people. What were they thinking of, if not that "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-five years ago, in the thin light of a great dawn, more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And now more than half century on, it is a honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

And long after our time on this earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history(简直就是‘北非谍影’里那句的翻版), why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year.  Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than in 1944.
作者: jmmom    时间: 2009-6-9 00:21

8# phantom932

Wow, great job, you guys or gals are super!


I have nothing else to say but one thing:
It will always be “an honor” but not“a honor” because the pronunciation of the word (/ˈɒnər/) starts with a vowel not a consonant.
The beginning letter “h” is silent.
作者: Chloé    时间: 2009-6-9 08:58

on phantom932

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the lives of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify yourself this day as we pause to fittingly(in an appropriate manner)  remember those men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during the Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of? They stared at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist. What were they thinking of? Of the all too brief life?  Of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children? Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of the tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused?  What were those soldiers thinking of is the destiny at wars to decide the fate of so many people. What were they thinking of, if not that "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-five years ago, in the thin light of a great dawn, more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And now more than half a century on, it is a honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

And long after our time on this earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles and all the wars across the span of human history(简直就是‘北非谍影’里那句的翻版), why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year.  Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than in 1944.
作者: sainfoinwy    时间: 2009-6-10 13:17

hw

Today we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944. Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated. Included among those so honored are the 3881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

 

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the lives of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented. Magnify yourself this day as we pause to // remember those men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France, and the allied nations during the Second World War.

 

They numbered 135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian. Some hours earlier, Eisenhower had wished them: good luck. All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of as they stared at the thin blank line of the coast emerging from the mist? What were they thinking of? Of the // lives, of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children; of the way their fathers held back the tears when they left for the war? What years that will be shed on the land//? What were those young soldiers thinking of, whose destiny it was to decide the fate of so many peoples? What were they thinking of, if not that 20 years old is too young to die?

 

65 years ago, in the thin light of a grey dawn, more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever a day of bravery. On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. As long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die. And more than half a century on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people alongside friends, President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper, with his royal highness, the Prince of Wales. Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the annals of warfare. We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

 

Long after our time on this Earth has passed, one world will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women who will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history, why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on these sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year? Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invaders had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than in 1994.

 

 

 

 

 

 



作者: sainfoinwy    时间: 2009-6-10 13:18

on Chloé

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the lives of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify yourself this day as we pause to fittingly(in an appropriate manner)  remember those men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during the Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of as they stared at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist. What were they thinking of? Of the all too brief life?  Of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children? Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of the tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused?  What were those soldiers thinking of, whose destiny it was to decide the fate of so many peoples? What were they thinking of, if not that "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-five years ago, in the thin light of a grey dawn, more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And now more than half a century on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

/ Long after our time on this Earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history(
简直就是北非谍影里那句的翻版), why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year?  Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than in 1944.



作者: 桃夭潘    时间: 2009-6-11 21:52

HW

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the lives of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify yourself this day as we pause to fittingly(in an appropriate manner)  remember those men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during the Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soilders thinking of they stared at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist. What  were they thinking of? Of the old too brief lives? Of the way their mothers gently kiss their foreheads when they were children? Of the way their fathers held back for the tears when they left for the war? Of the tears that would be shared  on the land that  have been abused? What was those young soilders were thinking of, whose destiny it was to decide the fate of so many peoples? What were they thinking of if not that 20 years old is too young to die.

65 years ago in the thin light of a grey dawn,more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever a day of bravery. On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. As long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die. And now more than half a century on, it is an honor for me to speak  for the British people alongside friends, President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime minister Harper and with His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the lagrest amphibious oporation in the Annals of warfare. We remenber those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined aimd the bullets and bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea, but would rise from these beaches below  to liberate the continent and to save the generation.

Long after our time on this Earth has passed,  one world will still bring forth the pride
and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes who sit before us. D-day, why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history?Why does this day  hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle took place on the sands few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year? Part of it, I think is the size of odds that weighed against success. For three centuries no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy and it had never been more difficult than in 1944.
作者: 印记    时间: 2009-6-18 21:43

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the lives of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify yourself this day as we pause to fittingly remember those men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during the Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of as they stared at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist. What were they thinking of? Of the all too brief lives?  Of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children? Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of the tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused?  What were those soldiers thinking of, whose destiny it was to decide the fate of so many peoples? What were they thinking of, if not that "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-five years ago, in the thin light of a grey dawn, more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And now more than half a century on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

Long after our time on this Earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year?  Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than in 1944.
作者: 印记    时间: 2009-6-18 21:44

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings that took place in the early morning hours of 6th June, 1944.  Today’s ceremony will honor the soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supreme sacrifice so that Europe might be liberated.  Included among those so honored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day at Omaha Beach and the 9,387 of our dead who are buried at this cemetery.

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches the lives of the families and citizens of the grateful nations here represented.  Magnify yourself this day as we pause to fittingly remember those men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France and the allied nations during the Second World War.

They numbered 135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed two armies: one American, the other British and Canadian.  Some hours earlier Eisenhower had wished them: ‘Good luck!’ All were silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of as they stared at the thin black line of the coast emerging from the mist. What were they thinking of? Of the all too brief lives?  Of the way their mothers gently kissed their foreheads when they were children? Of the way their fathers held back for tears when they left for the war?  Of the tears that will be shed on the land that has been abused?  What were those soldiers thinking of, whose destiny it was to decide the fate of so many peoples? What were they thinking of, if not that "20 years old is too young to die"?

Sixty-five years ago, in the thin light of a grey dawn, more than a thousand small craft took to a rough sea on the day that will be forever a day of bravery.  On that June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beaches below and into history. And as long as freedom lives, their deeds will never die.  And now more than half a century on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people, alongside friends-President Sarkozy, President Obama, Prime Minister Harper and with His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.  Each of us representing the peoples of our nations, as together we salute the brave fighting men of the largest amphibious operation in the Annals of warfare.  We remember those who advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterly determined amid the bullets and the bloodshed that freedom would not be pushed back into the sea but would rise from these beaches below to liberate a continent and to save a generation.

Long after our time on this Earth has passed, one word will still bring forth the pride and awe of men and women will never meet the heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why is this? Of all the battles in all the wars across the span of human history why does this day hold such a revered place in our memory? What is it about the struggle that took place on the sands a few short steps from here that brings us back to remember year after year after year?  Part of it, I think, is the size of the odds that weighed against success. For three centuries, no invader had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy. And it had never been more difficult than in 1944.
作者: xueman    时间: 2009-6-19 10:35

你们不会是一句一句听着写的吧!!?
作者: theresome    时间: 2009-6-30 00:20

Today, we commemorate the 65th anniversary of theD-Day landings that took place in the earlymorning hours of 6th, June, 1944. Today’s s ceremonies will honorthe soldiers, sailors and airmen who made the supremesacrifice so that Europe might be liberated. Including among those sohonored are the 3,881 who lost their lives on D-Day atOmaha beach andthe 9,387 of our dead who are buried in this cemetery

Our gracious loving Father in Heaven, we ask for the blessing of your presence on this significant event that touches thelives of the families and citizens of the gratefulnations here represented. Magnify yourself thisday as we pause to fittinglyremember those men and women who paid theultimate sacrifice for the freedom of France andthe allied nations during the Second World War.

They numbered135,000 and thousands of vessels. They formed 2 armies: One American, the other British andCanadian. Some hours earlier, Eisenhower had whishedthem Good luck!” Allwere silent. What were those young soldiers thinking of asthey stared at the thin black line of the coastemerging from the mist. _________________________________________________________.

65 years ago,in the thin night of greydawn, more than 1,000 small crafts took to a rough sea onthe day that will be forever a day of bravery. Onthat June morning, the young of our nations stepped out onto these beachesbelow and into history. And as long as lives, their deeds will never die. And now more than half acentury on, it is an honor for me to speak for the British people alongside friends President _____, President Obama, Prime Minister _____ and with his RoyalHighness the Prince Wales. Each of us representing the peoples of ournations, as together we salutethe brave fighting men of the largest amphibiousoperation in the annals of warfare. We remember thosewho advanced grain of sand by grain of sand, utterlydetermined amid the bullets and bloodshed that freedom will not be pushed back intothe sea but would rise from the beaches below to liberate the continent and tosave the generation.

Long after ourtime on this Earth has passed, one word will still bring forth,the pride and awe of men and women will never meetthe heroes who sit before us: D-Day. Why isthis? Of all battles in all the wars across the span of human history, why does this day hold sucha revered place in our memory? What is it aboutthe struggles that took place on the sands few steps from here that brings usback to remember year after year after year. Part of it, I think, isthe size of the odds thatweighed against success. For 3 centuries,no invaders had ever been able to cross the English Channel into Normandy, and it had never been more difficult than in 1944.




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