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标题: [word-lover] 【整理】2016-05-30 How to Use a Word [打印本页]

作者: qingchengshan    时间: 2016-5-31 08:00     标题: 2016-05-30 How to Use a Word



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作者: cristianjey    时间: 2016-6-1 12:21     标题: [Homework]2016-05-30 How to Use a Word

Today's word is cavalier, spelled C-A-V-A-L-I-E-R.

Cavalier is an adjective that means debonair. It can also mean marked by or given to offhand and often disdainful dismissal of important matters. Here is the word used in a sentence from Billboard.com by Gary Graff.

At a certain point, however, he opened up,… though under the condition that there be no recorders or notepads. For a guy who was so careful and deliberate and micro-managed everything about his career, he became surprisingly cavalier about being quoted directly - or accurately.

According to a dictionary prepared by Thomas Blount in 1656, a cavalier was a knight or gentleman, serving on horseback, a man of arms. That meaning is true to the history of the noun, which traces back to the Late Latin word caballarius, meaning horseman. By around 1600, it had also come to denote a roistering, swaggering fellow. In the 1640s, English Puritans applied it disdainfully to their adversaries, the swashbuckling Royalist followers of Charles I, who sported longish hair and swords. Although some thought those cavaliers to be several sorts of Malignant Men,… ready to commit all manner of Outrage and Violence, others saw them as quite suave - which may explain why cavalier came to be either complimentary or a bit insulting.

I'm Peter Sokolowski with your Word of the Day.

This post was generated by put listening repetition system,  Check the original dictation thread!
作者: go-getter    时间: 2016-6-1 20:46

HOMEWORK

Today's word is cavalier. Spell c-a-v-a-l-i-e-r.

Cavalier is an adjective that means ?. It can also mean marked by or given to off hand or off disdainful missile of important matters.

Here is the word used in a sentence from Billboard.com by Gary Craff. "At certain point however he opened up though under the condition that there been no recorders or no pads for a guy who is so careful and deliberate in micro managed? everything about his career, he became suprisingly cavalier about the incoded? directly or accurately.

According to a dictionary prepared by Thomas Blunt in 1656, a cavalier was a knight or gentleman serving on horseback, a man of arms.

That meaning is true to the history of Nun, which traced back to the late latern world ? use, meaning horseman. By around 1600, it also come to denote a walstegring swagering fellow.

In the 1640s, England puritans applied disdainfully to their address?. This ? sparking royal followers of Charles the first who spotted longest hair and swords.

Although some thought those cavaliers to be several sorts of militant men ready to commit all manner of outrage and violence. Others saw they as quite squaf?, which make explain why cavalier came to be either complimentary or a bit insulting.




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